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Kate Wills

11th Middlesex

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Kate Wills

Is any Pal actively researching the 11th Middlesex?

My friend Andy would like to know more about his great-uncle's service career and death at Arras.

Private G/34904 HARRY NORTH, 11th Bn., Middlesex Regiment

who died on

Monday 9 April 1917 . Age 26

Son of Albert and Annie North; husband of Mabel Plumb (formerly North) of 35, Paignton Rd., Tottenham, London. Born Tottenham.

FEUCHY CHAPEL BRITISH CEMETERY, WANCOURT, III. H. 11.Pas de Calais,

We have provided some basics, but advice from someone more familiar with this unit would be appreciated, as would a photo, if anyone is going near Wancourt.

Thankyou

Kate

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Geoff Parker

Kate

Hope this of use, it is the action of 11th Middx on 9th April 1917

11th Bn Middx Regt, 36th Bde, 12th Div.

11th Middx was the first battalion of the Middx Regt to come to grips with the enemy on 9th April, when it attacked Observation Ridge. Apart from three distinct lines of trenches to be taken, there was also the

Feuchy Switch, which ran back from the enemy forward positions to the western edge of Feuchy. In these trenches there were a number “works” – strongly defended positions, heavily wired and fully garrisoned.

The 37th Bde was attacking on the right and the 36th (to which the 11th Middx belonged) on the left. The 11th Middx were attacking on the right with the 7th R.Sussex were on the left. The frontage attacked by the 11th Middx ran from Sap 20 (a German sap about half-way between the railway and the Arras-Cambrai road. Portions of Guildford and Hertford Trenches and of Henley Lane were also in the Battalions objective.

At midnight, 8/9th April, the Battalion was in its assembly position in “I” lines and the support trenches, and formed up in three waves for the attack. No details of the strength of the Battalion in “other ranks” are given, but there were 20 officers – 4 to each company, the C.O., Adjutant, Lewis-gun Office and Signalling Officer.

As zero hour approached Lewis-gun teams crept out into No Mans Land, taking up selected positions from which to deal with hostile machine-guns and snipers should they become troublesome. Five minutes before Zero the order was given to “fix bayonets.” As the thunder of the barrage broke over the enemy trenches at 5.30am, the waiting troops followed quickly in its train, keeping as close to the screen of fire as possible. The 11th Middx diary states “The Battalion went over the top as practised on the training ground. The Artillery work was spendid and never really gave the Bosche a chance. Our fellows took full advantage of the different barrages and quickly captured the objectives i.e., the Black Line (Hertford Trench). So far casualties had been wonderfully slight and all ranks behaved slendidly.”

Thus the first objective, Black Line, fell without much resistance. But the Germans were no mean opponents, and by the time the 8th and 9th Bns of the R.Fusiliers passed through the 11th Middx and 7th R.Sussex in order to capture the second objective (Blue Line), The enemy’s defence was beginning to harden. But as far as the first day was concerned the 11th Middx had done their job. They consolidated the ground won and formed a strong point in Hertford Trench, which was manned by D Company. During the afternoon B, C, & A Companies went forward in support of 5th R.Berks, and by nightfall the 12th Division had reached the Feuchy Chapel-Feuchy road. During the afternoon a dug-out near Bn HQ blew up (probably a delay-action mine) and about 20 HQ details, including Sgt Harper and all the signallers were killed. Three or four more dug-outs went up shortly afterwards.

Headquarters and D Company then moved back to the old British line, where they were joined in the evening by B, C, and A Companies. The losses during the day were 6 Officers and about 100 OR’s were killed, wounded and missing.

Geoff

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Kate Wills

Geoff,

Thankyou very much indeed for such a detailed account. I have sent it on to Andy, who I know will be delighted to be able to apply so much extra information to Pte North's story.

Thanks again,

Kate

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Leighfield

I was interested to see the post regarding this battalion (one of the first in the New Army). I have a Great Uncle - John William (Jack) Leighfield, G107, 11th Middx, killed 15/02/16 and remembered on Loos Memorial (see attached image). His eldest brother George, a gunner with RGA was killed in 1917.

I would be grateful if anyone out there with access to the 11th Middx war diary could tell me what they were up to on 15th February 1916.

Interestingly, 2 other 11th Middx men on the Loos Memorial, Albert and Frederick Ludgate (G10909 &G10910 respectively) were killed the same day (13/02/1916). I have yet to ascertain their relationship (possibly brothers) but what a double tragedy for that family!!

Kate....It would appear that Harry North was one of 39 men of the 11th Btn killed on the same day. Their names are as follows:

Baldwin Thomas G/50096 Private

Rixon Henry James G/22182 L/CPL

Alderman Henry G/22983 Private

Allwright Frederick William G/5363 Private

Bates Richard Edwin Oliver G/40571 Private

Beezer George Thomas L/13439 Private

Blundell Sidney Frederick L/13101 SERGT

Bracey John Millard G/34516 Private

Brain Frank Archibald G/34926 Private

Brownsell Arthur Rider L/8946 L/SGT

Bull Charles Albert G/42186 L/CPL

Carter Henry Charles G/8818 Private

Clarke Albert Thomas G/11453 Private

Cromer Arthur Augustus G/27004 L/CPL

Dempsey Arthur G/5760 L/CPL

Ellis Louis Frederick G/22177 Private

Elmer William Ernest G/20588 Private

Freer Arthur Edgar G/21721 Private

Golder William G/50142 Private

Green James G/50144 Private

Harrison William G/20748 Private

Hart Charles Storey G/50075 Private

Hook James William G/17911 Private

Hunt Henry Charles G/50055 L/CPL

Hunter Alfred John G/46 SERGT

Long Edgar John G/34360 Private

McCabe George G/2239 Private

Miles Frank G/8629 Private

Nobbs Harry Alexander G/7768 Private

North Harry G/34904 Private

Noyce Frederick G/10388 Private

Outram George G/22184 Private

Salmon Victor George G/21230 Private

Sargent George G/3195 SERGT

Sinclair George N/A Second Lieutenant

Sparkes Frank Albert Allan G/12910 Private

Weedon Ernest Hugh G/50128 A/SGT

Yarham Arthur Victor G/5517 Private

Zala Albert Ernest G/12003 Private

Regards

Andy

post.jpg

Andy, I resized your pic to something that could be seen at normal screen resolution. Hope that's OK. Chris

Edited by Chris_Baker

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Leighfield

Cheers Chris

I struggle a bit with this new technology!!

Regards

Andy

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Marc Thompson

Kate,

As I was looking at the NORTH's today at the NA I took the liberty of checking the Medal Index Card entry for Harry:

Pte G/34904 NORTH Harry Middx Regt

Awarded Victory Medal & British War Medal

Medal Roll ref: Roll E/1/102 B22 Page 3561

No opportunity to check for his service record, look up the medal roll entry, etc.

Regards

Marc

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Kate Wills

Andy and Marc,

Thankyou very much for providing the extra information, from myself and Andy North.

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Howard

Leighfield

Here is some stuff about 11th Middlesex in early, I hope it helps.

Howard

An entry in the Diary of the 11th Middlesex (Lieut.-Colonel W. D. Ingle commanding), dated the 5th January, after moving back into the Festubert sector on the 4th, briefly describes the

kind of existence the Battalion was eking out in the front line at the beginning of 1916: "Pumping and baling carried out almost continuously in 'A' and 'D' Companies' trenches. 'D' Company's Island Group relieved every twenty-four hours, and go back to Le Touret for twenty-four hours to get dry. Enemy quiet, a few shells on 'B' Company's right during the morning, and a few 77-mm. shells on Rue de Bois - casualties nil." Relief came on the 13th, and the Battalion moved back into billets.

On 11th February the Battalion marched to Sally Labourse, preparatory to moving into trenches near the Quarries on the morning of the 12th, the 12th Division having taken over a portion of the line between Loos and the La Bassée Canal.

The 13th February was a day of trial and heavy loss to the Battalion. As soon as it was light enough to see each other's' trenches a duel with trench-mortar bombs and rifle grenades broke out between the opposing forces. About 10 a.m. the enemy's artillery joined in the combat, bombarding the trenches of the Middlesex with H.E. and (as the Battalion Diary has it) "smaller stuff." The trenches were damaged considerably and several casualties were suffered. But the Divisional Artillery and the "Heavies" retaliated, and, after some hours (about 3 p.m.), things were once more normal, although only for a little while. At 5.30 p.m. the enemy's artillery fire broke out again, and hostile shells of all calibre, up to 9-inch, fell in considerable numbers on the front line, support and communication trenches, which were blown about, and, in many places, completely wrecked. There were very few dug-outs in the line, and the Middlesex men had poor shelter from this hail of shell, with the inevitable result-heavy casualties. Just after 6 p.m. there were two enormous explosions, one from beneath the Kink and the other under Alexander trench, and clouds of earth, equipment, timber and the bodies of men shot up into the air-the enemy had exploded mines. Immediately following the explosions five groups of Germans, each of about ten men, rushed across from Bill's Bluff and tried to enter Bigger Willie. Rifle and machine-gun fire, and a storm of grenades, caused most of them to fall back; others fell dead or wounded, but six were successful in getting into the trenches of the Middlesex. Their triumph was, however, short-lived, for they were either shot down, bombed or bayoneted. They had already filled their pockets with Mills grenades when they were killed. As the Germans advanced, the enemy's artillery had lifted to the support trenches behind Bigger Willie and the Kink. At 6.25 p.m. the hostile bombardment died down, but twenty minutes later fires were lighted by the enemy in his front-line trenches, and he threw smoke bombs, though the wind carried the smoke northwards. At 7 p.m. normal conditions again reigned. The losses suffered by the Middlesex on the 13th were 2 officers wounded, 10 other ranks killed, 49 wounded and 5 missing-a costly day. The Battalion had clung to its position with great tenacity and gallantry, and a fitting acknowledgement of the steadfastness of all ranks was contained in a message from the G.O.C., First Army, which arrived during the 14th: "The G.O.C., First Army, wishes his congratulations conveyed to the officer commanding and troops who counter-attacked and drove back the enemy who had effected a lodgment in our trenches in the neighbourhood of the Kink on the evening of 13th" Lieut.-Colonel Ingle had every reason to be proud of his officers and men.

The 14th was comparatively quiet. The 15th was similarly uneventful, though several aerial torpedoes were fired by the Germans, one of which caused six casualties. Relief came on the 16th, the 9th Royal Fusiliers taking over the line from the 11th Middlesex, and the latter moved back to Railway Reserve and Lancashire Trenches and Vermelles.

On the 29th the Battalion again took over the trenches previously occupied opposite the Quarries.

It was not long, however, before the 11th Middlesex were again involved in heavy losses, even more serious than on the 13th February, for an attack had been ordered on the Chord, a particularly strong sector of the German line opposite the left of the 36th Brigade front. The attack was to be carried out by the 8th and 9th Royal Fusiliers. Three mines were to be exploded close to the Chord and the craters formed by the explosion, as well as the Chord itself, were to be occupied. It was expected that the enemy would make a desperate resistance. As all the orders referring to this little operation concern the two Battalions (8th and 9th Royal Fusiliers) making the attack, it is unnecessary to give more than the above outline. It was in rendering assistance to the attacking force that the 11th Middlesex became involved and sustained heavy losses.

The attack was to take place on the 2nd March at 5.45 p.m. On the previous evening at 6.20 p.m. a party of 11th Middlesex, consisting of one N.C.O. and 15 other ranks, was sent to Clarke's Keep to detonate grenades. Another party of one N.C.O. and 20 men followed on the morning of the 2nd at 9 a.m. to the same place and for the same purpose. Two hours later the first party returned, having been hard at work all night. That afternoon at 3.30 detailed orders for the attack reached the O.C., 11th Middlesex, and these were followed, half an hour later, by orders to detail a party of four N.C.Os. and 50 men (half from "C " Company and half from" B " Company) to be at the junction of Saville Row and Support Line under the O.C., 9th Royal Fusiliers; this party reached its destination at 5.15 p.m. Five minutes later the "Heavies" opened heavy fire on the enemy's trenches. At 5.30 p.m. all men of the Middlesex Regiment were moved out of their dug-outs, and when fifteen minutes later the mines were exploded, all ranks were "standing to." No less than 32,000 lbs. of explosives were used, and the explosions were deafening.

Three large mines and one small mine were blown under the Chord, and the infantry advanced immediately. But instead of being taken by surprise and shaken by the explosions, the Germans lined the parapets of their trenches and opened a steady fire on the attacking Fusiliers. No word reached the O.C., 11th Middlesex, until 7.30 p.m., when orders came to hand to render all possible assistance to the 9th Royal Fusiliers, who were on the left of the Middlesex. Half an hour later, 2nd Lieut. Marcus, with 50 men from "A" Company, was sent off to the junction of Saville Row and Support Line under the O.C., 9th Royal Fusiliers. At 8.40 p.m. 2nd Lieut. Moore, 50 men of " A" Company, and two grenadier squads were similarly despatched to come under the orders of the O.C., 9th Royal Fusiliers. At 9.30 p.m. orders were received by Colonel Ingle to place two of his companies at the disposal of the 9th Royal Fusiliers, and as these left the Battalion area, "B" Company extended to the left, taking over "A" Company's front, with its left flank in Poker Street, the remainder of " A" Company moving back to Vigo Street. "D" Company also extended its left to the junction of Massa Alley with Bigger Willie. About midnight on the 2nd March the dispositions of the 11th Middlesex appear to be as follows: "B" and "D" Companies held the front line; "A" Company on the left and "C" Company on the right of Vigo Street. The Middlesex men were reinforced at 11.55 p.m. by a company of 6th Connaught Rangers: this Company was attached to "D" Company of the Middlesex. Of the desperate fighting which had taken place during the day not a word is mentioned in the Battalion Diary of the Middlesex, nothing but moves and dispositions. But from the casualty list given later, from the 2nd to 4th March, it is obvious that the Battalion was heavily engaged with the enemy during that period.

At 9 a.m. on the 3rd Major Overton of the 9th Royal Fusiliers arrived at Colonel Ingle's Headquarters with orders for the Middlesex to relieve the Fusiliers, the Connaughts to relieve the Middlesex. At what time the relief began it is impossible to say, but apparently it was completed by 2.10 p.m., the dispositions of the Battalion being then: "D" Company-two platoons (right) in Kaiserin Trench from Clifford Street to Poker Street, two platoons in Vigo Street; "B" Company-two platoons (left) in Kaiserin Trench from Poker Street to Saville Row; "A" Company-4n Northampton Trench; ~" C" Company- 15 men in No. 1 Crater, 20 men in No. 2 Crater and 30 men in "A" Crater; the remainder of the "C" Company was on the right of Northampton Trench. The Battalion Bombers, thirty in number, were in Triangle Crater. Nos. 1 and 2 Craters were just south of the Chord and "A" Crater was on the left of it. Triangle Crater was just south of No. 2.

The 36th Brigade Diary has an interesting note on the relief:

"The two Battalions which delivered the attack on the night of the 2nd were relieved on the 3rd, and their place taken by the 11th Battalion Middlesex Regiment, on the right, and the 7th Royal Sussex Regiment, on the left. These two Battalions had heavier casualties than the Fusilier Battalions, which took the positions and held them during the first night. All the men of these two Battalions had been employed throughout the previous night as reinforcements and working parties."

The Middlesex and Sussex Battalions were, however, soon called upon to beat off repeated heavy and desperate counter-attacks. The position won on the 2nd March was magnificent; it commanded the whole of the German trenches as far as Fosse 8, and gave possession of practically the whole of the remainder of the Hohenzollern Redoubt, for which much bloody fighting bad already taken place. Moreover, the British trenches between the Hohenzollern Redoubt and the Vermelles railway were no longer over-looked or exposed to the enemy's rifle and machine-gun fire. It was, therefore, unlikely that the enemy would allow the possession of this valuable position to remain undisputed. Nor did he, for three separate attacks were launched against the Middlesex before, at 8.15 p.m. on the night of the 3rd, the Battalion Diary records, " shells and bombing quietened down." All these attacks (launched against the Sussex also, on the left of the 11th Middlesex) were beaten off with heavy loss to the enemy, though at 10 p.m. he was reported to be in occupation of the further lip of Triangle Crater. The night was passed in comparative quietude, all ranks being engaged in strengthening the defences and in sand-bagging the Craters. But at 5.45 a.m. on the 4th the Germans made fresh heavy bombing attacks, and more bombs and S.A.A. were called for to resist these attacks. A German sniper had, during the night, established himself in the further lip of Triangle Crater, commanding the trench between Craters Nos. 2 and "A." This

man could not be shifted and caused many casualties. The latter ~ hours of the 4th seem to have been fairly quiet, but again, at 1 a.m. on the 5th, another heavy bombing attack was launched against the Middlesex men in Crater No. 2. It was beaten off with loss to the enemy.

At 9 a.m. the 6th Buffs began to arrive in order to relieve the Middlesex men. But the relief took hours to carry out, and it was 4 p.m. before the line, with the exception of Crater "A," was taken over by the incoming Battalion. Repeated attempts to relieve the troops in Crater "A" had failed, and it was not until darkness had fallen that the exhausted garrison was replaced and marched back to Sailly Labourse.

During those three days-the 2nd to 4th March inclusive- not a single casualty is recorded in the Battalion Diary of the 11th Middlesex, but from the Diary of the 36th Brigade Head-quarters the following list is taken :-" Officers killed: Capt. A. F. Henty; Lieuts. H. L. Hughes-Jones, L. A. Hughman, C. V. Dodgson; wounded, Lieut. W. E. G. Henkel; 2nd Lieuts. R. Underhill, F. A. Moore, S. W. Hedgecock, D. S. Marcus; other ranks, 35 killed, 207 wounded. Total, 9 officers and 242 other ranks."

Several days were spent in billets cleaning up and reorganising and then, on the 11th March, the 11th Middlesex again took over front-line trenches in the Quarry sector. The 12th and 13th were quiet days, but during the evening of the latter date a little incident occurred which amply demonstrated the good comrade-ship which existed between officers and men, even to the point of sacrificing their lives one for the other.

In front of the trenches occupied by the Middlesex, and outside Lookout Crescent, there were a number of mine craters, in which the Tunnelling Company had received orders to set off a small mine. Colonel Ingle gave orders for the disposition of his men so that no one should be injured by the explosion or falling debris. At 5 p.m. the mine was fired, and after the explosion Lieut. Crombie (O.C., "B" Company), 2nd Lieut. C. K. Smith and a few men went along the trench and found some miners stretched out senseless in the mine shafts. The two officers led the way and tried to drag the unconscious miners out, but were themselves gassed, together with three other ranks. The second officer (2nd Lieut. Smith) was so badly gassed that he died within an hour. The fine heroism of this young officer and the "greater love" for others had cost him his life. Apparently a mistake in putting only seven-foot tamping, when ten-foot tamping had been ordered, was the cause of the explosion coming back up the shafts and filling the place with gas fumes. "This gross neglect of orders," records the Battalion Diary, "caused the death of one of our best officers."

Towards the end of March (on the 24th and 25th) the enemy exploded two mines, and for several days there was much activity in bombing, trench-mortaring and the firing of rifle grenades by both sides. The Middlesex suffered a number of casualties during these operations-2 officers were wounded and 41 other ranks were killed, wounded or missing. April was uneventful, and May was spent entirely out of the front line. In June the 12th Division received orders to move south, and on the 16th the 36th Infantry Brigade entrained at Fouquereuil Station for " a new area." All units reached Longeau during the night 26th-27th, and on the latter date marched to billets in Vignacourt. The 11th Middlesex had now a new C.O.-Lieut.-Colonel G. L. Oliver (who had joined the Battalion on the 24th June), 'vice Lieut.-Colonel W. D. Ingle. On the 30th June the 36th Brigade proceeded to fresh billets at Fréchencourt, arriving at midnight.

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Howard

Sorry, it should have said

Here is some stuff about 11th Middlesex in early 1916!

Howard

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Leighfield

Thanks very much Howard....Most impressive and I am very grateful to you for taking the time (and effort!!) to provide this information.

It sounds from your post that perhaps aerial torpedoes 'did for' Uncle Jack. Please forgive my ignorance, but what in fact is an aerial torpedo?. Is it a type of trench mortar?

Your sources??.....Are they purely from 11th Btn & 36th Brigade diaries (held at PRO/NA - Kew)??... As an obvious Middx 'buff', where is their Museum??.. Would the museum be likely to hold documentation/diaries on the 11th Btn that Kew doesn't??

Regards and thanks again

Andy

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Kate Wills

Howard,

Thankyou very much for this massive addition to my friend Andy's researches into his great-uncle. I shall be taking a print-out to him next week.

Kate

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Howard

Andy

Your sources??.....Are they purely from 11th Btn & 36th Brigade diaries (held at PRO/NA - Kew)??... As an obvious Middx 'buff', where is their Museum??.. Would the museum be likely to hold documentation/diaries on the 11th Btn that Kew doesn't??

My single source is "The Die-Hards in the Great War", Everard Wyrall. Written in 1926, I assume it was written directly from the war diaries as they are quoted in places. The maps in the book are the same as in the Edmonds official history.

Their museum is now in Dover Castle along with other regiments following the disbandmant of the Middlesex. I have yet to look but I am told they do have records that may be viewed. Website for info

I cannot imagine being a "buff". I wonder if I am not the only one that finds the whole subject of the Great War rather boggling! Some start their interest by following a family member, I came at it the other way round, I stated to concentrate on the 1st Middlesex to get a clearer picture of what is was all about. Whilst I have some stuff on the Middlesex, I may as well share it.

Howard

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Howard

Andy

I forgot to say, I don't know what aerial torpedoes are. I just tried Google and that came up with a whole range of stuff. In view of that, perhaps a post in the Air War section may throw up something Great War specific, it looks like the term has been used for many different weapons over the years.

Howard

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Leighfield

Thankyou again Howard

Looks like I'll be adding 'Die Hards in the Great War' on my letter to Santa!!

Regards

Andy

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buxboy

I spotted this post about 11th Middlesex and wondered if its not too much trouble to check what the Battalion was doing 26/10/16 when George Peart was killed. George was originally with the 4th Btn when they first went to France in August 1914 and was later transferred to the 11th.

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Robert Dunlop
what in fact is an aerial torpedo?

Andy

'Aerial torpedo' is a term that can be found in at least three different circumstances in WW1. In this instance, it is likely to refer to a large fin-stabilized shell fired from an uncommonly-used German mortar. The French had a similar mortar shell that was used earlier in the war.

I have also seen the term used in the diary of a Turkish officer at Gallipoli. The translator noted that the term probably referred to some form of rocket used by the Turks. It is possibly the same sort of device that is referred to above.

Air-to-air rockets were also referred to as 'aerial torpedoes'. They were used to down observation balloons.

Robert

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Howard

buxboy

In 1916 during the Battle of le Transloy Ridge, the 11th Middlesex moved up to the front line on 7th October and came under heavy shelling. They suffered badly until relieved on the 10th when they moved back to Bernafay Wood. On 19th they moved to Fricourt Camp, on 21st to Buire and by the 26th. October, were back in the Agny sector, but they did not go back into the line until November 1916.

I hope that helps.

Howard

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Leighfield

Buxboy

I am not yet in posession of a copy of their war diary, but am pretty sure that they had by then been removed with the remainder of 12th Division from the Somme and were replacing (on 25th/26th October) 14th Division at Arras. Perhaps other Pals could confirm this?

A quick look at SDITGW and CWGC has provided the following, which you may already have:

Peart, George

L/7848

Private

Date of death - 26/10/1916

SDITGW shows DIED

Aged 46

Buried at Etaples Military Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France....VIII.D.12

Regards

Andy

p.s....many thanks to Robert also for the info on aerial torpedo's

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buxboy

Thanks very much for the info.

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howard nobbs

Hi Everybody

I wondered if there was still life in this topic as it's about 4 years since any replies were posted, anyway, here goes.

I was delighted to find a ref to my grandfather, in the list of the 39 kia on 9th April 1917, prior to finding this via Google, I had no knowledge of this fantastic site. As you will gather I am a new Pal and aim to be a good one. My interest is rather specific to the Middlesex and the 11th Btn in particular.

Harry Alexander Nobbs, my grandfather, was 40 years old when kia, my father was only 2years at the time so no info came from that possible source. However I have been through the Census and CWGC, etc, but have never found out when or in what manner he joined-up. I have never seen a picture of H.A.N or found details of his service record/history. I am very grateful to the Pals who posted the invaluable information earlier and wondered if any Pals out there have a similar problem or solution. All contributions gratefully received.

Thanks for reading my rather rambling contribution.

Howard (Nobbsy)

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Guest jab110163

My colleague is researching her Great Uncle Arthur Doubtfire from London who died 29th December 1915. He was in the 11th bt Middx regiment and is buried in Cuinchy, Pas de Calais, Guards cemetry. Does anyone know what was happening at this time to the 11th Battalion.

Many Thanks

Julie

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GraemeClarke

Hi Julie

He was KiA at Givenchy during a company relief. The NA, who hold the copyright and have the War Diary available to download, records,

"Enemy exploded a small mine on our right. Our bombers co-operated with 7th Royal Sussex with bombs and rifle grenades. Lt. Col. Osbourne came round and expressed his thanks for the assistance given to his bombers by a party of our bombers.

Battalion relieved by 9th Royal Fusiliers and went into support;

A Company in billets at Windy Corner

B Company at le Plantin, 2 platoons in billets, 2 platoons in Keeps.

C Company Givenchy Keep (50 rifles) Herts Redoubt (1 platoon) Hilder Redoubt (half platoon) Moat House Corner.

Casualties 2 other ranks killed, 5 wounded."

Regards,

Graeme

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john1acot

Interested in 11th Battalion Middlesex Regiment as my grandfather served with them and was badly wounded.

Only just came across this forum. It’s been fantastic reading. 

Be grateful if anyone can point me in the direction of any other resource on the 11th BTN Middlesex.

I went to the new National Army Museum. Supposedly was the  Middlesex collection but there was nothing! Other Regimental museums around the country have brilliant displays, but the NAM had nothing on display what so ever!

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john1acot

My grandfather is Clifford Stanley Wonnacott.

Only info I have found is his medal card. Has his surname spelt incorrectly.

BAAE9AB5-205D-4A95-B62E-F3609FC803E2.jpeg

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johnboy

The war diary should be available to download from \\The National Archives sit [3,50]

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