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Arthur

'Cloth Insignia'

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Arthur

I have the following information regarding 'Cloth Formation Insignia':

Major John Waring's Identification Pamphlet for WWI. It is a Military

Heraldry Society publication which has now been long out of print.

Details of British, Australian and Canadian insignia are given. They are

shown, with a reference to the colour, size and material that they are made from.

If this would assist anyone? I would be willing to search it for any

queries they may have.

Arthur

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AndrewThornton

Insignia worn by Staffordshire Units during the Great War

The following information is a list of known items of insignia worn on uniform by Staffordshire units that served overseas during the First World War.

Regular Battalions

The South Staffordshire Regiment

1st Battalion

August 1914 Pietermaritzburg, South Africa

Returned to England, landing at Southampton 19th September 1914

19th September 1914To 22nd Brigade, 7th Division

7th October 1914 Landed at Zeebrugge

20th December 1915 Transferred to 91st Brigade, 7th Division

18th – 25th November 1917 Moved to Italy and remained there until the Armistice

Insignia

A scheme of cloth patches was introduced for the infantry of 7th Division in July 1916, the colour signifying the brigade and the shape the seniority of the battalion within the brigade. The patches were worn on the upper sleeves of the service dress tunic. The 1st South Staffords wore a dark blue circle as part of this scheme.

In addition to the cloth patches, the South Staffords also wore a large yellow Staffordshire Knot on the front of their cloth helmet covers from 1917, and this device was painted on the front of the helmet in 1918 while serving in Italy.

2nd Battalion

August 1914 Aldershot.

Part of 6th Brigade, 2nd Division for the remainder of the war

14th August 1914 Landed in France

Insignia

No scheme of cloth patches was introduced in 2nd Division during the war, but it is known that battalions wore devices based on their regimental cap badge painted on the front of their helmets in 1918.

The North Staffordshire Regiment

1st Battalion

August 1914 Buttevant, Ireland

Part of 17th Brigade, 6th Division

14th September 1914 Landed at St Nazaire

18th October 1915 Transferred to 72nd Brigade, 24th Division

Insignia

The 1st North Staffords wore no cloth insignia during their service with 6th Division, but did so on joining 24th Division. The scheme used by 24th Division was based on the colour of the patch signifying the brigade and the shape the seniority of the battalion within the brigade. The patches were worn on the upper sleeves of the service dress tunic. In the case of the 1st North Staffords, their patch was a dark green triangle. Above the triangle was worn a diamond-shaped device in different colours to denote companies within the battalions. The colours used were: “A” Company, Blue; “B” Company, Green; “C” Company, Red; “D” Company, Yellow.

On being issued with steel helmets in 1916, units of the division wore flashes in regimental colours on the helmet cover. The North Stafford’s device was a horizontal rectangle in regimental colours divided into three parts – crimson (left), black (centre) and white (right). The insignia was originally stencilled onto the right side of the helmet cover. By 1918 this device had been transferred to the front of the helmet and was either painted or worn on a cloth helmet cover as before.

2nd Battalion

August 1914 Rawalpindi. Remained in India throughout the war

1915 Active service on the North-West Frontier

1919 Took part in the Third Afghan War

Insignia

The 2nd North Staffords wore a pugaree flash on the left side of their Wolseley pith helmets and Topees. The design was worked onto a black vertical rectangle and consisted of an embroidered Prince of Wales’ plume and scroll above a Staffordshire Knot in white thread, (a similar design to that used on the cap badge), above the title “NORTH STAFFORD”, which was embroidered in red thread in the same configuration as the brass shoulder titles. The flash had been introduced shortly before the Great War and this continued to be worn on the tropical headdress of battalions stationed in garrisons “East of Suez” up to the end of the Second World War.

Special Reserve Battalions

4th (Extra Reserve) Battalion, The South Staffordshire Regiment

August 1914 Lichfield.

The battalion moved to Jersey shortly after the outbreak of war, returning to the mainland in September 1916. After being stationed at Marske and Redcar, the 4th South Staffords joined 67th Division at Canterbury.

10th October 1917 Moved to France and joined 7th Brigade, 25th Division

22nd June 1918 Part of 25th Composite Brigade to 50th Division

11th July 1918 Reduced to cadre strength, and transferred to 116th Brigade, 39th Division

6th November 1918 Disbanded in France

Insignia

On joining 25th Division, the 4th South Staffords adopted the scheme of cloth insignia already in use within the formation. Two divisional signs were used by this division. All ranks wore a horseshoe in red cloth on the back of their tunics, below the collar. The division's "chequerboard" sign was painted on battalion transport.

In addition to the horseshoe, the men of the battalion also wore a device on their upper arms that indicated their brigade, battalion and company. The upper bar signified the company of the wearer, with the following colours being used: Bn. H.Q., Purple; “A” Coy, Blue; “B” Coy, Yellow; “C” Coy, Light Green; “D” Coy, Dark Green. The two lower bars in red indicated the 7th Brigade, with the number of bars showing the seniority of the 4th South Staffords within the brigade. It is known that the battalions of 25th Division also wore additional devices on the upper arms above the brigade indicator, but no evidence for any additional insignia worn by the 4th South Staffords has been found.

4th (Extra Reserve) Battalion, The North Staffordshire Regiment

August 1914 Lichfield, then moved to Jersey.

June 1917 To 200th Brigade, 67th Division.

7th October 1917 Left the Division and moved to France, landing at Le Havre.

To 167th Brigade, 56th Division

15th November 1917 Transferred to 106th Brigade, 35th Division

3rd February 1918 Transferred to 105th Brigade, 35th Division

Insignia

The scheme of cloth patches used within 35th Division consisted of a variety of horizontal and vertical bars signifying battalion and brigade. These devices are known to have been worn on the upper arms and on the back of service dress tunics below the collar. The configuration of the cloth patches worn by the 4th North Staffords is unknown.

Territorial Force

1/1st Staffordshire Yeomanry

August 1914 Stafford – then moved to Diss

Part of The North Midland Mounted Brigade

27th October 1915 Left Southampton, originally ordered to move to Salonika, but destination changed to Egypt.

November 1915 Landed at Alexandria

April 1916 To 22nd Mounted Brigade, Western Frontier Force

February 1917 To Anzac Mounted Division

June 1917 To Yeomanry Mounted Division (1st Mounted Division from April 1918)

July 1918 To 12th Cavalry Brigade, 4th Cavalry Division

Insignia

The 1/1st Staffordshire Yeomanry wore a pugaree flash on the left side of their Wolseley pith helmets and Topees shortly after their arrival in Egypt. The patch was a diamond in regimental colours, divided into three sections: red (left); white (centre); and blue (right). This flash remained in use until February 1917, when a patch consisting of a white Staffordshire Knot embroidered onto a blue diamond replaced it.

137th (Staffordshire) Brigade

The Staffordshire Brigade formed part of the North Midland Division of the Territorial Force. In August 1914, the brigade had the following units under command:

Brigade Headquarters Stafford

5th Battalion, South Staffordshire Regiment Walsall

6th Battalion, South Staffordshire Regiment Wolverhampton

5th Battalion, North Staffordshire Regiment Hanley

6th Battalion, North Staffordshire Regiment Burton-on-Trent

After mobilising at Burton-on-Trent, The North Midland Division carried out training around Luton and Bishop’s Stortford before receiving orders to proceed to France in late February 1915, the first complete Territorial Force division to move to the Western Front. The units of the 1st Staffordshire Brigade landed at Le Havre between 3rd-5th March 1915, and was made up of the “First-Line” battalions of each of the units:

1/5th South Staffords

1/6th South Staffords

1/5th North Staffords

1/6th North Staffords

On 12th May 1915, the North Midland Division was retitled 46th (North Midland) Division, with the Staffordshire Brigade becoming 137th Brigade. The Brigade was to serve on the Western Front for the remainder of the war, except for a brief period of service in Egypt between January-February 1916. The 1/5th North Staffords left the division on 30th January 1918 and were transferred to 59th (2nd North Midland) Division.

Insignia

The scheme of cloth insignia and other identification devices used by units of 46th Division was complicated and subject to modification as the war progressed. The first devices worn on uniform appear to have been worn by officers on the back of their jackets, below the collar. This scheme was in use from the summer of 1915 by at least one battalion in 46th Division, (1/8th Sherwood Foresters), and consisted of two vertical bars in green cloth. It is not known whether units of 137th Brigade used this scheme.

Around June 1916, devices began to be worn on the backs of tunics by all ranks and were also painted onto battalion transport. The 137th Brigade adopted the Staffordshire Knot as their identification and this was displayed by the units in the following colours:

1/5th South Staffords: Red

1/6th South Staffords: Blue

1/5th North Staffords: Black

1/6th North Staffords: Yellow

The insignia worn on uniform was an embroidered knot worked onto a drab rectangle. The insignia displayed on transport was the divisional sign (left); a blue square indicating, “first line transport” (centre); and the battalion insignia (right). Both the divisional sign and battalion device were outlined in white. There is also evidence that some units of 137th Brigade had additional devices stencilled onto the front of helmet covers at this time. An extant helmet cover worn by an officer of the 1/6th South Staffords has the battalion’s blue knot patch stitched on the front. The North Staffordshire battalions wore a combination consisting of a small white silhouette of the Prince of Wales’ plume over a small Staffordshire knot in the appropriate battalion colour. The 137th Brigade Machine Gun Company appear to have had a small saltire (probably symbolising the “crossed guns” of the Machine Gun Corps cap badge), stencilled on the left side of the helmet cover. The colour of the saltire is not known, but may possibly have been red.

By 1918, the patches featuring the Staffordshire Knot were moved to the upper arms and the shape of the patch was changed to an oval. Further devices were also painted onto left side of the steel helmets by this time. The insignia consisted of a blue square with a red bar placed either below or at either side to denote the battalion.

The 1/6th North Staffords are also known to have worn additional

devices painted on the front of their helmets. The combination

comprised a white silhouette of the Prince of Wales’ plume

(top); a small horizontal bar in regimental colours (centre);

and a small yellow Staffordshire Knot (bottom).

176th (Staffordshire) Brigade

The 2nd Staffordshire Brigade was formed in January 1915 from the “Second Line” battalions of the Territorial Force units of the South and North Staffordshire Regiments:

2/5th South Staffords

2/6th South Staffords

2/5th North Staffords

2/6th North Staffords

The Brigade formed part of the 2nd North Midland Division. In August 1915, the division became 59th (2nd North Midland) Division and the brigade was retitled 176th Brigade. The 59th Division later moved to Ireland in April 1916 and was involved in suppressing the Easter Rising in Dublin. After further training in England, the division moved to France in February 1917.

Insignia

The scheme of cloth patches worn by infantry of 59th Division was introduced shortly before the formation moved to France. The colour of the patches indicated the brigade, (in the case of 176th Brigade, all cloth insignia was red), and the shape of the patch the unit: 2/5th South Staffords - Triangle; 2/6th South Staffords - Circle; 2/5th North Staffords - Square; and 2/6th North Staffords - Diamond.

The 176th Light Trench Mortar Battery are also known to have worn a red rectangle patch with a blue grenade, (the qualification badge for troops trained to operate mortars), sewn on top.

On 30th January 1918, the 176th Brigade was reorganised from four battalions

to three. The 2/5th South Staffords were disbanded and the 1/5th North Staffords

were posted from 46th Division and amalgamated with the 2/5th Battalion. The new battalion, the 5th North Staffords, adopted a new cloth patch which combined a circle patch sewn over a square, while the 2/6th South Staffords changed to the triangle previously worn by the 2/5th South Staffords.

After suffering very heavy casualties during the German Spring Offensives in 1918, the Staffordshire units of 176th Brigade were withdrawn from front-line duties. The 2/6th South Staffords and 2/6th North Staffords were reduced to cadre strength and posted to 66th Division. Both battalions were disbanded on 31st July 1918. The 5th North Staffords were also reduced to cadre strength and transferred to 16th Division before moving to 39th Division in June. The battalion was demobilised on 6th November 1918.

The Service Battalions

The South Staffordshire Regiment

7th (Service) Battalion

Formed at Lichfield, August 1914, as part of K1

August 1914 To 33rd Brigade, 11th (Northern) Division

7th August 1915 Landed at Suvla Bay, Gallipoli

December 1915 To Imbros

February 1916 To Egypt

July 1916 To France – remained on the Western Front for the remainder of the war.

Insignia

The infantry of 11th Division adopted a scheme of cloth insignia shortly after arriving in Egypt following their service on the Gallipoli Peninsula. The devices were worn on both sides of the Wolseley pith helmet and topees and took the form of a rectangle in various colours (signifying the brigade) and Roman numerals to identify the seniority of the battalion within the brigade. The patch worn by the 7th South Staffords was a green rectangle, (for 33rd Brigade), with a black “III” embroidered onto it denoting that the “third” battalion within the formation. When 11th Division was sent to France in July 1916, the patches were transferred to be worn on the back of the jacket, below the collar.

8th (Service) Battalion

Formed at Lichfield, September 1914, as part of K2

September 1914 To 51st Brigade, 17th (Northern) Division

14th July 1915 Landed at Boulogne

23rd February 1918 Disbanded in France

Insignia

The scheme of insignia worn by infantry units of 17th Division was introduced in 1916. The cloth patches were cut into shapes to indicate the brigade, with the battalion identified by regimental colours.

The cloth patch worn by the 8th South Staffords was a circle, (denoting a unit of 51st Brigade), halved yellow and red. A different layout of the regimental colours on the patch indicated the company of the wearer, but the exact sequence is unknown.

9th (Service) Battalion (Pioneers)

Formed at Lichfield, September 1914, as part of K3

September 1914 Attached as Army Troops to 23rd Division

December 1914 Converted to a Pioneer Battalion

24th August 1915 Landed at Boulogne

November 1917 Moved to Italy and remained there until the Armistice

Insignia

Infantry units of 23rd Division are known to have worn cloth patches on the back of their jackets, as well as painted devices on their steel helmets, but no information regarding the insignia worn by the 9th South Staffords has been discovered.

North Staffordshire Regiment

7th (Service) Battalion

Formed at Lichfield, 29 August 1914, as part of K1

August 1914 Posted to 39th Brigade, 13th (Western) Division

July 1915 Landed at Gallipoli

January 1916 To Egypt

February 1916 To Mesopotamia

July 1918 39th Brigade sent to the North Persia Force

Insignia

Infantry units of 13th Division worn flashes of various shapes in regimental colours on the pugarees of their Wolseley pith helmets and topees. The device worn by the 7th North Staffords was a black diamond.

8th (Service) Battalion

Formed at Lichfield, 18 September 1914, as part of K2

September 1914 Posted to 57th Brigade, 19th (Western) Division

18th July 1915 Landed at Boulogne

7th February 1918 Transferred to 56th Brigade, 19th (Western) Division

Insignia

Infantry battalions of 19th Division wore cloth patches of various shapes in regimental colours on the upper arms of their service dress tunics from early 1917. The device worn by the 8th North Staffords was a square halved horizontally black over white.

9th (Service) Battalion (Pioneers)

Formed at Lichfield, 20 September 1914, as part of K3

September 1914 Attached as Army Troops to 22nd Division

20th April 1915 Transferred as Pioneer Battalion to 37th Division

29th July 1915 Landed at Le Havre

Insignia

The 37th Division adopted a scheme of cloth identification

patches shortly before embarking for France in July 1915.

The 9th North Staffords were identified as the Divisional

Pioneer battalion by a green horizontal bar worn on the upper arms of the service dress tunic.

In 1918, the units of 37th Division began to wear a woven version of the divisional sign, a gold horseshoe on the upper arms above the cloth patches that had been worn since 1915.

Infantry units also wore a strip of ribbon on the shoulder straps to indicate the company of the wearer.

12th (Service) Battalion

11th June 1918 The 11th Garrison Guard Battalion, recently formed in France, became the 12th (Garrison) Bn. Renamed as a Service unit on 13th July 1918.

15th June 1918 Posted to 119th Brigade, 40th Division

Insignia

The 40th Division are known to have had a scheme of cloth diamonds worn on the upper arms that identified companies, battalions and brigades in a complicated sequence, but no evidence of the combination worn by the 12th North Staffords has been found.

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wipers99

Hi there

Do you have any indications as to the scheme of battle patches worn by 2/Wilts (30th Division) in March 1918? The Osprey book shows the embroidered patches worn whrn the division was reconstituted after the horrendous losses of 21st March but states that these replaced an earlier system.

Any info gratefully received!

Thanks

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Arthur
Hi there

Do you have any indications as to the scheme of battle patches worn by 2/Wilts (30th Division) in March 1918? The Osprey book shows the embroidered patches worn whrn the division was reconstituted after the horrendous losses of 21st March but states that these replaced an earlier system.

Any info gratefully received!

Thanks

Hi,

I have had a look through the i-d pamphlet for you, and I am sorry to say that there is nothing in there that I can find relating to the 2nd Bn Wiltshire Regt.

Regards

Arthur

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Tyneside Chinaman

Hi

would you mind checking the Durham LI entries please,

thanks

John

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Arthur
Hi

would you mind checking the Durham LI entries please,

thanks

John

Hi John,

I have the following information:

5th Bn. D.L.I. blue square, 2 inch sides, cotton.

1st/7th Bn. D'L.I. red left/green disc, 1 inch diam, felt.

10th Bn. D.L.I. red silhouette of bugle, felt.

12th Bn. D.L.I. green/red/green square with central green disc, felt.

13th Bn. D.L.I. red left/green diamond, felt.

14th Bn. D.L.I. dark green triangle, 3 inch base X 2 inch sides, felt.

15th Bn. D.L.I. green inverted triangle, 2 inch top X 3 inch sides, felt.

18th Bn. D.L.I.a red rectangle sewn on dark green rectangle, felt.

18th Bn. D.L.I.b red bottom/white 1 inch square, felt.

22nd Bn. D'L.I. greenleft/red disc, 1 inch diam, felt.

Regards

Arthur

post-210-1204308428.jpg

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Tyneside Chinaman

Arthur

thanks very much indeed

regards

John

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Peter Lead
Insignia worn by Staffordshire Units during the Great War

The following information is a list of known items of insignia worn on uniform by Staffordshire units that served overseas during the First World War.

Regular Battalions

The South Staffordshire Regiment

1st Battalion

August 1914 Pietermaritzburg, South Africa

Returned to England, landing at Southampton 19th September 1914

19th September 1914To 22nd Brigade, 7th Division

7th October 1914 Landed at Zeebrugge

20th December 1915 Transferred to 91st Brigade, 7th Division

18th – 25th November 1917 Moved to Italy and remained there until the Armistice

Insignia

A scheme of cloth patches was introduced for the infantry of 7th Division in July 1916, the colour signifying the brigade and the shape the seniority of the battalion within the brigade. The patches were worn on the upper sleeves of the service dress tunic. The 1st South Staffords wore a dark blue circle as part of this scheme.

In addition to the cloth patches, the South Staffords also wore a large yellow Staffordshire Knot on the front of their cloth helmet covers from 1917, and this device was painted on the front of the helmet in 1918 while serving in Italy.

2nd Battalion

August 1914 Aldershot.

Part of 6th Brigade, 2nd Division for the remainder of the war

14th August 1914 Landed in France

Insignia

No scheme of cloth patches was introduced in 2nd Division during the war, but it is known that battalions wore devices based on their regimental cap badge painted on the front of their helmets in 1918.

The North Staffordshire Regiment

1st Battalion

August 1914 Buttevant, Ireland

Part of 17th Brigade, 6th Division

14th September 1914 Landed at St Nazaire

18th October 1915 Transferred to 72nd Brigade, 24th Division

Insignia

The 1st North Staffords wore no cloth insignia during their service with 6th Division, but did so on joining 24th Division. The scheme used by 24th Division was based on the colour of the patch signifying the brigade and the shape the seniority of the battalion within the brigade. The patches were worn on the upper sleeves of the service dress tunic. In the case of the 1st North Staffords, their patch was a dark green triangle. Above the triangle was worn a diamond-shaped device in different colours to denote companies within the battalions. The colours used were: "A" Company, Blue; "B" Company, Green; "C" Company, Red; "D" Company, Yellow.

On being issued with steel helmets in 1916, units of the division wore flashes in regimental colours on the helmet cover. The North Stafford's device was a horizontal rectangle in regimental colours divided into three parts – crimson (left), black (centre) and white (right). The insignia was originally stencilled onto the right side of the helmet cover. By 1918 this device had been transferred to the front of the helmet and was either painted or worn on a cloth helmet cover as before.

2nd Battalion

August 1914 Rawalpindi. Remained in India throughout the war

1915 Active service on the North-West Frontier

1919 Took part in the Third Afghan War

Insignia

The 2nd North Staffords wore a pugaree flash on the left side of their Wolseley pith helmets and Topees. The design was worked onto a black vertical rectangle and consisted of an embroidered Prince of Wales' plume and scroll above a Staffordshire Knot in white thread, (a similar design to that used on the cap badge), above the title "NORTH STAFFORD", which was embroidered in red thread in the same configuration as the brass shoulder titles. The flash had been introduced shortly before the Great War and this continued to be worn on the tropical headdress of battalions stationed in garrisons "East of Suez" up to the end of the Second World War.

Special Reserve Battalions

4th (Extra Reserve) Battalion, The South Staffordshire Regiment

August 1914 Lichfield.

The battalion moved to Jersey shortly after the outbreak of war, returning to the mainland in September 1916. After being stationed at Marske and Redcar, the 4th South Staffords joined 67th Division at Canterbury.

10th October 1917 Moved to France and joined 7th Brigade, 25th Division

22nd June 1918 Part of 25th Composite Brigade to 50th Division

11th July 1918 Reduced to cadre strength, and transferred to 116th Brigade, 39th Division

6th November 1918 Disbanded in France

Insignia

On joining 25th Division, the 4th South Staffords adopted the scheme of cloth insignia already in use within the formation. Two divisional signs were used by this division. All ranks wore a horseshoe in red cloth on the back of their tunics, below the collar. The division's "chequerboard" sign was painted on battalion transport.

In addition to the horseshoe, the men of the battalion also wore a device on their upper arms that indicated their brigade, battalion and company. The upper bar signified the company of the wearer, with the following colours being used: Bn. H.Q., Purple; "A" Coy, Blue; "B" Coy, Yellow; "C" Coy, Light Green; "D" Coy, Dark Green. The two lower bars in red indicated the 7th Brigade, with the number of bars showing the seniority of the 4th South Staffords within the brigade. It is known that the battalions of 25th Division also wore additional devices on the upper arms above the brigade indicator, but no evidence for any additional insignia worn by the 4th South Staffords has been found.

4th (Extra Reserve) Battalion, The North Staffordshire Regiment

August 1914 Lichfield, then moved to Jersey.

June 1917 To 200th Brigade, 67th Division.

7th October 1917 Left the Division and moved to France, landing at Le Havre.

To 167th Brigade, 56th Division

15th November 1917 Transferred to 106th Brigade, 35th Division

3rd February 1918 Transferred to 105th Brigade, 35th Division

Insignia

The scheme of cloth patches used within 35th Division consisted of a variety of horizontal and vertical bars signifying battalion and brigade. These devices are known to have been worn on the upper arms and on the back of service dress tunics below the collar. The configuration of the cloth patches worn by the 4th North Staffords is unknown.

Territorial Force

1/1st Staffordshire Yeomanry

August 1914 Stafford – then moved to Diss

Part of The North Midland Mounted Brigade

27th October 1915 Left Southampton, originally ordered to move to Salonika, but destination changed to Egypt.

November 1915 Landed at Alexandria

April 1916 To 22nd Mounted Brigade, Western Frontier Force

February 1917 To Anzac Mounted Division

June 1917 To Yeomanry Mounted Division (1st Mounted Division from April 1918)

July 1918 To 12th Cavalry Brigade, 4th Cavalry Division

Insignia

The 1/1st Staffordshire Yeomanry wore a pugaree flash on the left side of their Wolseley pith helmets and Topees shortly after their arrival in Egypt. The patch was a diamond in regimental colours, divided into three sections: red (left); white (centre); and blue (right). This flash remained in use until February 1917, when a patch consisting of a white Staffordshire Knot embroidered onto a blue diamond replaced it.

137th (Staffordshire) Brigade

The Staffordshire Brigade formed part of the North Midland Division of the Territorial Force. In August 1914, the brigade had the following units under command:

Brigade Headquarters Stafford

5th Battalion, South Staffordshire Regiment Walsall

6th Battalion, South Staffordshire Regiment Wolverhampton

5th Battalion, North Staffordshire Regiment Hanley

6th Battalion, North Staffordshire Regiment Burton-on-Trent

After mobilising at Burton-on-Trent, The North Midland Division carried out training around Luton and Bishop's Stortford before receiving orders to proceed to France in late February 1915, the first complete Territorial Force division to move to the Western Front. The units of the 1st Staffordshire Brigade landed at Le Havre between 3rd-5th March 1915, and was made up of the "First-Line" battalions of each of the units:

1/5th South Staffords

1/6th South Staffords

1/5th North Staffords

1/6th North Staffords

On 12th May 1915, the North Midland Division was retitled 46th (North Midland) Division, with the Staffordshire Brigade becoming 137th Brigade. The Brigade was to serve on the Western Front for the remainder of the war, except for a brief period of service in Egypt between January-February 1916. The 1/5th North Staffords left the division on 30th January 1918 and were transferred to 59th (2nd North Midland) Division.

Insignia

The scheme of cloth insignia and other identification devices used by units of 46th Division was complicated and subject to modification as the war progressed. The first devices worn on uniform appear to have been worn by officers on the back of their jackets, below the collar. This scheme was in use from the summer of 1915 by at least one battalion in 46th Division, (1/8th Sherwood Foresters), and consisted of two vertical bars in green cloth. It is not known whether units of 137th Brigade used this scheme.

Around June 1916, devices began to be worn on the backs of tunics by all ranks and were also painted onto battalion transport. The 137th Brigade adopted the Staffordshire Knot as their identification and this was displayed by the units in the following colours:

1/5th South Staffords: Red

1/6th South Staffords: Blue

1/5th North Staffords: Black

1/6th North Staffords: Yellow

The insignia worn on uniform was an embroidered knot worked onto a drab rectangle. The insignia displayed on transport was the divisional sign (left); a blue square indicating, "first line transport" (centre); and the battalion insignia (right). Both the divisional sign and battalion device were outlined in white. There is also evidence that some units of 137th Brigade had additional devices stencilled onto the front of helmet covers at this time. An extant helmet cover worn by an officer of the 1/6th South Staffords has the battalion's blue knot patch stitched on the front. The North Staffordshire battalions wore a combination consisting of a small white silhouette of the Prince of Wales' plume over a small Staffordshire knot in the appropriate battalion colour. The 137th Brigade Machine Gun Company appear to have had a small saltire (probably symbolising the "crossed guns" of the Machine Gun Corps cap badge), stencilled on the left side of the helmet cover. The colour of the saltire is not known, but may possibly have been red.

By 1918, the patches featuring the Staffordshire Knot were moved to the upper arms and the shape of the patch was changed to an oval. Further devices were also painted onto left side of the steel helmets by this time. The insignia consisted of a blue square with a red bar placed either below or at either side to denote the battalion.

The 1/6th North Staffords are also known to have worn additional

devices painted on the front of their helmets. The combination

comprised a white silhouette of the Prince of Wales' plume

(top); a small horizontal bar in regimental colours (centre);

and a small yellow Staffordshire Knot (bottom).

176th (Staffordshire) Brigade

The 2nd Staffordshire Brigade was formed in January 1915 from the "Second Line" battalions of the Territorial Force units of the South and North Staffordshire Regiments:

2/5th South Staffords

2/6th South Staffords

2/5th North Staffords

2/6th North Staffords

The Brigade formed part of the 2nd North Midland Division. In August 1915, the division became 59th (2nd North Midland) Division and the brigade was retitled 176th Brigade. The 59th Division later moved to Ireland in April 1916 and was involved in suppressing the Easter Rising in Dublin. After further training in England, the division moved to France in February 1917.

Insignia

The scheme of cloth patches worn by infantry of 59th Division was introduced shortly before the formation moved to France. The colour of the patches indicated the brigade, (in the case of 176th Brigade, all cloth insignia was red), and the shape of the patch the unit: 2/5th South Staffords - Triangle; 2/6th South Staffords - Circle; 2/5th North Staffords - Square; and 2/6th North Staffords - Diamond.

The 176th Light Trench Mortar Battery are also known to have worn a red rectangle patch with a blue grenade, (the qualification badge for troops trained to operate mortars), sewn on top.

On 30th January 1918, the 176th Brigade was reorganised from four battalions

to three. The 2/5th South Staffords were disbanded and the 1/5th North Staffords

were posted from 46th Division and amalgamated with the 2/5th Battalion. The new battalion, the 5th North Staffords, adopted a new cloth patch which combined a circle patch sewn over a square, while the 2/6th South Staffords changed to the triangle previously worn by the 2/5th South Staffords.

After suffering very heavy casualties during the German Spring Offensives in 1918, the Staffordshire units of 176th Brigade were withdrawn from front-line duties. The 2/6th South Staffords and 2/6th North Staffords were reduced to cadre strength and posted to 66th Division. Both battalions were disbanded on 31st July 1918. The 5th North Staffords were also reduced to cadre strength and transferred to 16th Division before moving to 39th Division in June. The battalion was demobilised on 6th November 1918.

The Service Battalions

The South Staffordshire Regiment

7th (Service) Battalion

Formed at Lichfield, August 1914, as part of K1

August 1914 To 33rd Brigade, 11th (Northern) Division

7th August 1915 Landed at Suvla Bay, Gallipoli

December 1915 To Imbros

February 1916 To Egypt

July 1916 To France – remained on the Western Front for the remainder of the war.

Insignia

The infantry of 11th Division adopted a scheme of cloth insignia shortly after arriving in Egypt following their service on the Gallipoli Peninsula. The devices were worn on both sides of the Wolseley pith helmet and topees and took the form of a rectangle in various colours (signifying the brigade) and Roman numerals to identify the seniority of the battalion within the brigade. The patch worn by the 7th South Staffords was a green rectangle, (for 33rd Brigade), with a black "III" embroidered onto it denoting that the "third" battalion within the formation. When 11th Division was sent to France in July 1916, the patches were transferred to be worn on the back of the jacket, below the collar.

8th (Service) Battalion

Formed at Lichfield, September 1914, as part of K2

September 1914 To 51st Brigade, 17th (Northern) Division

14th July 1915 Landed at Boulogne

23rd February 1918 Disbanded in France

Insignia

The scheme of insignia worn by infantry units of 17th Division was introduced in 1916. The cloth patches were cut into shapes to indicate the brigade, with the battalion identified by regimental colours.

The cloth patch worn by the 8th South Staffords was a circle, (denoting a unit of 51st Brigade), halved yellow and red. A different layout of the regimental colours on the patch indicated the company of the wearer, but the exact sequence is unknown.

9th (Service) Battalion (Pioneers)

Formed at Lichfield, September 1914, as part of K3

September 1914 Attached as Army Troops to 23rd Division

December 1914 Converted to a Pioneer Battalion

24th August 1915 Landed at Boulogne

November 1917 Moved to Italy and remained there until the Armistice

Insignia

Infantry units of 23rd Division are known to have worn cloth patches on the back of their jackets, as well as painted devices on their steel helmets, but no information regarding the insignia worn by the 9th South Staffords has been discovered.

North Staffordshire Regiment

7th (Service) Battalion

Formed at Lichfield, 29 August 1914, as part of K1

August 1914 Posted to 39th Brigade, 13th (Western) Division

July 1915 Landed at Gallipoli

January 1916 To Egypt

February 1916 To Mesopotamia

July 1918 39th Brigade sent to the North Persia Force

Insignia

Infantry units of 13th Division worn flashes of various shapes in regimental colours on the pugarees of their Wolseley pith helmets and topees. The device worn by the 7th North Staffords was a black diamond.

8th (Service) Battalion

Formed at Lichfield, 18 September 1914, as part of K2

September 1914 Posted to 57th Brigade, 19th (Western) Division

18th July 1915 Landed at Boulogne

7th February 1918 Transferred to 56th Brigade, 19th (Western) Division

Insignia

Infantry battalions of 19th Division wore cloth patches of various shapes in regimental colours on the upper arms of their service dress tunics from early 1917. The device worn by the 8th North Staffords was a square halved horizontally black over white.

9th (Service) Battalion (Pioneers)

Formed at Lichfield, 20 September 1914, as part of K3

September 1914 Attached as Army Troops to 22nd Division

20th April 1915 Transferred as Pioneer Battalion to 37th Division

29th July 1915 Landed at Le Havre

Insignia

The 37th Division adopted a scheme of cloth identification

patches shortly before embarking for France in July 1915.

The 9th North Staffords were identified as the Divisional

Pioneer battalion by a green horizontal bar worn on the upper arms of the service dress tunic.

In 1918, the units of 37th Division began to wear a woven version of the divisional sign, a gold horseshoe on the upper arms above the cloth patches that had been worn since 1915.

Infantry units also wore a strip of ribbon on the shoulder straps to indicate the company of the wearer.

12th (Service) Battalion

11th June 1918 The 11th Garrison Guard Battalion, recently formed in France, became the 12th (Garrison) Bn. Renamed as a Service unit on 13th July 1918.

15th June 1918 Posted to 119th Brigade, 40th Division

Insignia

The 40th Division are known to have had a scheme of cloth diamonds worn on the upper arms that identified companies, battalions and brigades in a complicated sequence, but no evidence of the combination worn by the 12th North Staffords has been found.

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Peter Lead

9th Battalion North Staffordshire

The 9th North Staffords did not wear a green flash to indicate that they were the divisional pioneer battalion.

The War Diary (17th October 1916) states:

'The following distinguishing marks were oredered to be worn by companies on both arms below the shoulder seam - a strip of coloured cloth 5" by 1" wide- A Company Red

B Company Dark Blue

C Company Violet

D Company Green.

I hope this helps. My grandfather (then CSM A Company ) wore the red strips.

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JulianB

Arthur, I'd be grateful if you could look up what your pamplet has for the Kings Liverpool Regt

thanks, Julian

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john gregory
Insignia worn by Staffordshire Units during the Great War

The following information is a list of known items of insignia worn on uniform by Staffordshire units that served overseas during the First World War.

Regular Battalions

The South Staffordshire Regiment

1st Battalion

August 1914 Pietermaritzburg, South Africa

Returned to England, landing at Southampton 19th September 1914

19th September 1914To 22nd Brigade, 7th Division

7th October 1914 Landed at Zeebrugge

20th December 1915 Transferred to 91st Brigade, 7th Division

18th – 25th November 1917 Moved to Italy and remained there until the Armistice

Insignia

A scheme of cloth patches was introduced for the infantry of 7th Division in July 1916, the colour signifying the brigade and the shape the seniority of the battalion within the brigade. The patches were worn on the upper sleeves of the service dress tunic. The 1st South Staffords wore a dark blue circle as part of this scheme.

In addition to the cloth patches, the South Staffords also wore a large yellow Staffordshire Knot on the front of their cloth helmet covers from 1917, and this device was painted on the front of the helmet in 1918 while serving in Italy.

2nd Battalion

August 1914 Aldershot.

Part of 6th Brigade, 2nd Division for the remainder of the war

14th August 1914 Landed in France

Insignia

No scheme of cloth patches was introduced in 2nd Division during the war, but it is known that battalions wore devices based on their regimental cap badge painted on the front of their helmets in 1918.

The North Staffordshire Regiment

1st Battalion

August 1914 Buttevant, Ireland

Part of 17th Brigade, 6th Division

14th September 1914 Landed at St Nazaire

18th October 1915 Transferred to 72nd Brigade, 24th Division

Insignia

The 1st North Staffords wore no cloth insignia during their service with 6th Division, but did so on joining 24th Division. The scheme used by 24th Division was based on the colour of the patch signifying the brigade and the shape the seniority of the battalion within the brigade. The patches were worn on the upper sleeves of the service dress tunic. In the case of the 1st North Staffords, their patch was a dark green triangle. Above the triangle was worn a diamond-shaped device in different colours to denote companies within the battalions. The colours used were: “A” Company, Blue; “B” Company, Green; “C” Company, Red; “D” Company, Yellow.

On being issued with steel helmets in 1916, units of the division wore flashes in regimental colours on the helmet cover. The North Stafford’s device was a horizontal rectangle in regimental colours divided into three parts – crimson (left), black (centre) and white (right). The insignia was originally stencilled onto the right side of the helmet cover. By 1918 this device had been transferred to the front of the helmet and was either painted or worn on a cloth helmet cover as before.

2nd Battalion

August 1914 Rawalpindi. Remained in India throughout the war

1915 Active service on the North-West Frontier

1919 Took part in the Third Afghan War

Insignia

The 2nd North Staffords wore a pugaree flash on the left side of their Wolseley pith helmets and Topees. The design was worked onto a black vertical rectangle and consisted of an embroidered Prince of Wales’ plume and scroll above a Staffordshire Knot in white thread, (a similar design to that used on the cap badge), above the title “NORTH STAFFORD”, which was embroidered in red thread in the same configuration as the brass shoulder titles. The flash had been introduced shortly before the Great War and this continued to be worn on the tropical headdress of battalions stationed in garrisons “East of Suez” up to the end of the Second World War.

Special Reserve Battalions

4th (Extra Reserve) Battalion, The South Staffordshire Regiment

August 1914 Lichfield.

The battalion moved to Jersey shortly after the outbreak of war, returning to the mainland in September 1916. After being stationed at Marske and Redcar, the 4th South Staffords joined 67th Division at Canterbury.

10th October 1917 Moved to France and joined 7th Brigade, 25th Division

22nd June 1918 Part of 25th Composite Brigade to 50th Division

11th July 1918 Reduced to cadre strength, and transferred to 116th Brigade, 39th Division

6th November 1918 Disbanded in France

Insignia

On joining 25th Division, the 4th South Staffords adopted the scheme of cloth insignia already in use within the formation. Two divisional signs were used by this division. All ranks wore a horseshoe in red cloth on the back of their tunics, below the collar. The division's "chequerboard" sign was painted on battalion transport.

In addition to the horseshoe, the men of the battalion also wore a device on their upper arms that indicated their brigade, battalion and company. The upper bar signified the company of the wearer, with the following colours being used: Bn. H.Q., Purple; “A” Coy, Blue; “B” Coy, Yellow; “C” Coy, Light Green; “D” Coy, Dark Green. The two lower bars in red indicated the 7th Brigade, with the number of bars showing the seniority of the 4th South Staffords within the brigade. It is known that the battalions of 25th Division also wore additional devices on the upper arms above the brigade indicator, but no evidence for any additional insignia worn by the 4th South Staffords has been found.

4th (Extra Reserve) Battalion, The North Staffordshire Regiment

August 1914 Lichfield, then moved to Jersey.

June 1917 To 200th Brigade, 67th Division.

7th October 1917 Left the Division and moved to France, landing at Le Havre.

To 167th Brigade, 56th Division

15th November 1917 Transferred to 106th Brigade, 35th Division

3rd February 1918 Transferred to 105th Brigade, 35th Division

Insignia

The scheme of cloth patches used within 35th Division consisted of a variety of horizontal and vertical bars signifying battalion and brigade. These devices are known to have been worn on the upper arms and on the back of service dress tunics below the collar. The configuration of the cloth patches worn by the 4th North Staffords is unknown.

Territorial Force

1/1st Staffordshire Yeomanry

August 1914 Stafford – then moved to Diss

Part of The North Midland Mounted Brigade

27th October 1915 Left Southampton, originally ordered to move to Salonika, but destination changed to Egypt.

November 1915 Landed at Alexandria

April 1916 To 22nd Mounted Brigade, Western Frontier Force

February 1917 To Anzac Mounted Division

June 1917 To Yeomanry Mounted Division (1st Mounted Division from April 1918)

July 1918 To 12th Cavalry Brigade, 4th Cavalry Division

Insignia

The 1/1st Staffordshire Yeomanry wore a pugaree flash on the left side of their Wolseley pith helmets and Topees shortly after their arrival in Egypt. The patch was a diamond in regimental colours, divided into three sections: red (left); white (centre); and blue (right). This flash remained in use until February 1917, when a patch consisting of a white Staffordshire Knot embroidered onto a blue diamond replaced it.

137th (Staffordshire) Brigade

The Staffordshire Brigade formed part of the North Midland Division of the Territorial Force. In August 1914, the brigade had the following units under command:

Brigade Headquarters Stafford

5th Battalion, South Staffordshire Regiment Walsall

6th Battalion, South Staffordshire Regiment Wolverhampton

5th Battalion, North Staffordshire Regiment Hanley

6th Battalion, North Staffordshire Regiment Burton-on-Trent

After mobilising at Burton-on-Trent, The North Midland Division carried out training around Luton and Bishop’s Stortford before receiving orders to proceed to France in late February 1915, the first complete Territorial Force division to move to the Western Front. The units of the 1st Staffordshire Brigade landed at Le Havre between 3rd-5th March 1915, and was made up of the “First-Line” battalions of each of the units:

1/5th South Staffords

1/6th South Staffords

1/5th North Staffords

1/6th North Staffords

On 12th May 1915, the North Midland Division was retitled 46th (North Midland) Division, with the Staffordshire Brigade becoming 137th Brigade. The Brigade was to serve on the Western Front for the remainder of the war, except for a brief period of service in Egypt between January-February 1916. The 1/5th North Staffords left the division on 30th January 1918 and were transferred to 59th (2nd North Midland) Division.

Insignia

The scheme of cloth insignia and other identification devices used by units of 46th Division was complicated and subject to modification as the war progressed. The first devices worn on uniform appear to have been worn by officers on the back of their jackets, below the collar. This scheme was in use from the summer of 1915 by at least one battalion in 46th Division, (1/8th Sherwood Foresters), and consisted of two vertical bars in green cloth. It is not known whether units of 137th Brigade used this scheme.

Around June 1916, devices began to be worn on the backs of tunics by all ranks and were also painted onto battalion transport. The 137th Brigade adopted the Staffordshire Knot as their identification and this was displayed by the units in the following colours:

1/5th South Staffords: Red

1/6th South Staffords: Blue

1/5th North Staffords: Black

1/6th North Staffords: Yellow

The insignia worn on uniform was an embroidered knot worked onto a drab rectangle. The insignia displayed on transport was the divisional sign (left); a blue square indicating, “first line transport” (centre); and the battalion insignia (right). Both the divisional sign and battalion device were outlined in white. There is also evidence that some units of 137th Brigade had additional devices stencilled onto the front of helmet covers at this time. An extant helmet cover worn by an officer of the 1/6th South Staffords has the battalion’s blue knot patch stitched on the front. The North Staffordshire battalions wore a combination consisting of a small white silhouette of the Prince of Wales’ plume over a small Staffordshire knot in the appropriate battalion colour. The 137th Brigade Machine Gun Company appear to have had a small saltire (probably symbolising the “crossed guns” of the Machine Gun Corps cap badge), stencilled on the left side of the helmet cover. The colour of the saltire is not known, but may possibly have been red.

By 1918, the patches featuring the Staffordshire Knot were moved to the upper arms and the shape of the patch was changed to an oval. Further devices were also painted onto left side of the steel helmets by this time. The insignia consisted of a blue square with a red bar placed either below or at either side to denote the battalion.

The 1/6th North Staffords are also known to have worn additional

devices painted on the front of their helmets. The combination

comprised a white silhouette of the Prince of Wales’ plume

(top); a small horizontal bar in regimental colours (centre);

and a small yellow Staffordshire Knot (bottom).

176th (Staffordshire) Brigade

The 2nd Staffordshire Brigade was formed in January 1915 from the “Second Line” battalions of the Territorial Force units of the South and North Staffordshire Regiments:

2/5th South Staffords

2/6th South Staffords

2/5th North Staffords

2/6th North Staffords

The Brigade formed part of the 2nd North Midland Division. In August 1915, the division became 59th (2nd North Midland) Division and the brigade was retitled 176th Brigade. The 59th Division later moved to Ireland in April 1916 and was involved in suppressing the Easter Rising in Dublin. After further training in England, the division moved to France in February 1917.

Insignia

The scheme of cloth patches worn by infantry of 59th Division was introduced shortly before the formation moved to France. The colour of the patches indicated the brigade, (in the case of 176th Brigade, all cloth insignia was red), and the shape of the patch the unit: 2/5th South Staffords - Triangle; 2/6th South Staffords - Circle; 2/5th North Staffords - Square; and 2/6th North Staffords - Diamond.

The 176th Light Trench Mortar Battery are also known to have worn a red rectangle patch with a blue grenade, (the qualification badge for troops trained to operate mortars), sewn on top.

On 30th January 1918, the 176th Brigade was reorganised from four battalions

to three. The 2/5th South Staffords were disbanded and the 1/5th North Staffords

were posted from 46th Division and amalgamated with the 2/5th Battalion. The new battalion, the 5th North Staffords, adopted a new cloth patch which combined a circle patch sewn over a square, while the 2/6th South Staffords changed to the triangle previously worn by the 2/5th South Staffords.

After suffering very heavy casualties during the German Spring Offensives in 1918, the Staffordshire units of 176th Brigade were withdrawn from front-line duties. The 2/6th South Staffords and 2/6th North Staffords were reduced to cadre strength and posted to 66th Division. Both battalions were disbanded on 31st July 1918. The 5th North Staffords were also reduced to cadre strength and transferred to 16th Division before moving to 39th Division in June. The battalion was demobilised on 6th November 1918.

The Service Battalions

The South Staffordshire Regiment

7th (Service) Battalion

Formed at Lichfield, August 1914, as part of K1

August 1914 To 33rd Brigade, 11th (Northern) Division

7th August 1915 Landed at Suvla Bay, Gallipoli

December 1915 To Imbros

February 1916 To Egypt

July 1916 To France – remained on the Western Front for the remainder of the war.

Insignia

The infantry of 11th Division adopted a scheme of cloth insignia shortly after arriving in Egypt following their service on the Gallipoli Peninsula. The devices were worn on both sides of the Wolseley pith helmet and topees and took the form of a rectangle in various colours (signifying the brigade) and Roman numerals to identify the seniority of the battalion within the brigade. The patch worn by the 7th South Staffords was a green rectangle, (for 33rd Brigade), with a black “III” embroidered onto it denoting that the “third” battalion within the formation. When 11th Division was sent to France in July 1916, the patches were transferred to be worn on the back of the jacket, below the collar.

8th (Service) Battalion

Formed at Lichfield, September 1914, as part of K2

September 1914 To 51st Brigade, 17th (Northern) Division

14th July 1915 Landed at Boulogne

23rd February 1918 Disbanded in France

Insignia

The scheme of insignia worn by infantry units of 17th Division was introduced in 1916. The cloth patches were cut into shapes to indicate the brigade, with the battalion identified by regimental colours.

The cloth patch worn by the 8th South Staffords was a circle, (denoting a unit of 51st Brigade), halved yellow and red. A different layout of the regimental colours on the patch indicated the company of the wearer, but the exact sequence is unknown.

9th (Service) Battalion (Pioneers)

Formed at Lichfield, September 1914, as part of K3

September 1914 Attached as Army Troops to 23rd Division

December 1914 Converted to a Pioneer Battalion

24th August 1915 Landed at Boulogne

November 1917 Moved to Italy and remained there until the Armistice

Insignia

Infantry units of 23rd Division are known to have worn cloth patches on the back of their jackets, as well as painted devices on their steel helmets, but no information regarding the insignia worn by the 9th South Staffords has been discovered.

North Staffordshire Regiment

7th (Service) Battalion

Formed at Lichfield, 29 August 1914, as part of K1

August 1914 Posted to 39th Brigade, 13th (Western) Division

July 1915 Landed at Gallipoli

January 1916 To Egypt

February 1916 To Mesopotamia

July 1918 39th Brigade sent to the North Persia Force

Insignia

Infantry units of 13th Division worn flashes of various shapes in regimental colours on the pugarees of their Wolseley pith helmets and topees. The device worn by the 7th North Staffords was a black diamond.

8th (Service) Battalion

Formed at Lichfield, 18 September 1914, as part of K2

September 1914 Posted to 57th Brigade, 19th (Western) Division

18th July 1915 Landed at Boulogne

7th February 1918 Transferred to 56th Brigade, 19th (Western) Division

Insignia

Infantry battalions of 19th Division wore cloth patches of various shapes in regimental colours on the upper arms of their service dress tunics from early 1917. The device worn by the 8th North Staffords was a square halved horizontally black over white.

9th (Service) Battalion (Pioneers)

Formed at Lichfield, 20 September 1914, as part of K3

September 1914 Attached as Army Troops to 22nd Division

20th April 1915 Transferred as Pioneer Battalion to 37th Division

29th July 1915 Landed at Le Havre

Insignia

The 37th Division adopted a scheme of cloth identification

patches shortly before embarking for France in July 1915.

The 9th North Staffords were identified as the Divisional

Pioneer battalion by a green horizontal bar worn on the upper arms of the service dress tunic.

In 1918, the units of 37th Division began to wear a woven version of the divisional sign, a gold horseshoe on the upper arms above the cloth patches that had been worn since 1915.

Infantry units also wore a strip of ribbon on the shoulder straps to indicate the company of the wearer.

12th (Service) Battalion

11th June 1918 The 11th Garrison Guard Battalion, recently formed in France, became the 12th (Garrison) Bn. Renamed as a Service unit on 13th July 1918.

15th June 1918 Posted to 119th Brigade, 40th Division

Insignia

The 40th Division are known to have had a scheme of cloth diamonds worn on the upper arms that identified companies, battalions and brigades in a complicated sequence, but no evidence of the combination worn by the 12th North Staffords has been found.

How long did it take to type this out. jg

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Arthur
Arthur, I'd be grateful if you could look up what your pamplet has for the Kings Liverpool Regt

thanks, Julian

Hi Julian,

No time period is given, sizes where known.

2nd Bn KING'S White letters on scarlet - Worn on helmet - Emb on felt.

1st/5th Bn Green rectangle 1½" X 3” – Felt

2nd/5th Bn Green diamond 1½" sides – Felt

1st/6th Bn Dark green rectangle 1½" X 3” - Felt

2nd/6th Dark green diamond with red bar below [Coy bar] – Felt

1st/7th Bn Dark green inverted triangle 3" sides - Felt

7th Bn Green triangle 2½” sides [Coy bars worn below] - Cotton

2nd/7th Bn Green triangle 2" sides 1½” base - Cotton

1st/8th Bn Red rectangle 1" X 3” – Felt

2nd/8th Bn Dark green disc 2” diam [Coy bars worn below disc] - Felt

1st/9th Bn Green square 2” [Coy bars worn below] – Felt

2nd/8th Bn Dark yellow square 2”- Felt

1st/10th Bn Black rectangle 1½" X 3” - Felt

2nd/10th Yellow diamond 3" X 2” - Felt

12th Bn Black 1” square with black bar below- Felt

a13th Bn Diamond Light blue/rust brown –Worn by HQ Coy - Cotton

b13th Bn Diamonds 1½" sides A Coy light blue; B Coy dark green; C Coy rust brown; D Coy yellow - Cotton

17th Bn Black rectangle 2½" X 2” - Felt

19th Bn White rectangle 2" X 1" - Felt

Regards

Arthur

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Fen Tiger

Hi all,

I hope that someone here can help me (despite all those people that I know that claim I am beyond help! :P ) I am looking for information on any Regimental/Brigade/Div cloth insignia worn by anyy of these particular units

2nd Batt Sherwood Foresters

1/1 Cambridgeshire Regt

any help that you kind people can give would be great.

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Arthur
Hi all,

I hope that someone here can help me (despite all those people that I know that claim I am beyond help! :P ) I am looking for information on any Regimental/Brigade/Div cloth insignia worn by anyy of these particular units

2nd Batt Sherwood Foresters

1/1 Cambridgeshire Regt

any help that you kind people can give would be great.

Hi

I have no information for 2nd Bn Sherwood Foresters.

Cambridgeshire Regt = 2½" square light blue with cental black vertical stripe, braid on cotton.

Sorry no time period given.

Regards

Arthur

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Chris Foster

Hello Arthur,

Any information on the 1st/6th Duke of Wellington's Regt

Kindest Regards

Chris

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Arthur
Hello Arthur,

Any information on the 1st/6th Duke of Wellington's Regt

Kindest Regards

Chris

Hi Chris,

I have information on three items:

[1]Black rectangle 2½" X 1½" worn on shoulder strap, Felt.

[2]Black rectangle 2½" X ¾, Felt

[3]Black disc 1¼ diameter, Felt

Sorry no time period.

Regards

Arthur

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JulianB

Arthur, I must apologise for the delay in thanking you for the Liverpool information. I regret I've only just seen the post !

thanks

Julian

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Chris Foster

Arthur,

Thank you very much for the info and your time.

Kindest regards

Chris

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Fen Tiger
Hi

I have no information for 2nd Bn Sherwood Foresters.

Cambridgeshire Regt = 2½" square light blue with cental black vertical stripe, braid on cotton.

Sorry no time period given.

Regards

Arthur

Hi Arthur, Thank you for your help. Did your search for the Sherwood Forester ne turn up anything for any of the other battns?

Regards

Ian

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Ian Robertson

Hello,

I have this cloth insignia badge which was in a box of memorabilia, most of which had belonged to 19333, 2nd Lt Alexander Kilpatrick Collins of the 12/13 Northumberland Fusiliers KiA on the 29th May 1918. Canyou identify it? It is approx 45mm x 60mm

Thanks in advance

regards

Ian

post-16112-1211218734.jpg

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wainfleet

Ian

I'm not sure what formation that sign is for, but it's most definitely not Great War - probably Second World War.

Regards

W.

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Ian Robertson

W,

many thanks for your response. There were some other bits and pieces in the box which were from WW2 and Later

regards

Ian

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Arthur
Hi Arthur, Thank you for your help. Did your search for the Sherwood Forester ne turn up anything for any of the other battns?

Regards

Ian

Hi Ian,

I have the following information on Sherwood Forester Bns.:

1st Bn Dark green left / maroon disc 2" diam, Felt.

4th Bn 1917 Central brown diamond on green, bottom half of a horizontal oval, Felt on felt.

5th Bn Green rectangle 2"X1" worn on the back, felt

2nd/5th Bn Green triangle 2" sides, Felt

1st/6th Bn Dark green diamond 1½" sides, worn on the back, Felt.

2nd/6th Bn Green disc 2½"diam, Felt.

1st/7th Bn Dark green Maltese cross worn on the back, Felt.

2nd/7th Bn Olive green square 2½" sides, Cotton

a 1st/8th Bn Other ranks Dark green square 2" sides, Felt

b 1st/8th Bn Green diamond Officers 1½" sides, Felt

2nd/8th Bn Green diamond 3"X2", Felt

9th Bn White numeral 'IV'on dark green rectangle, Painted on cotton. Note: Not 'IX'

10th Bn Brown disc 2"diam, Felt

12th Bn Central horizontal white stripe on a horizontal dark green rectangle, worn on the back, Ribbon

16th Bn Black square on green square, Felt on felt

17th Bn 1915 Central black diamond on green bottom half of a horizontal oval, Felt on felt.

Regards

Arthur

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Arthur
Hello,

I have this cloth insignia badge which was in a box of memorabilia, most of which had belonged to 19333, 2nd Lt Alexander Kilpatrick Collins of the 12/13 Northumberland Fusiliers KiA on the 29th May 1918. Canyou identify it? It is approx 45mm x 60mm

Thanks in advance

regards

Ian

post-16112-1211218734.jpg

Hi Ian,

As mentioned not from the Great War period.

Your flash is for the Allied Land Forces South East Asia 1939-45.

Regards

Arthur

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Arthur

Hi Ian,

Since 1945 the flash was used by G.H.Q. Far East Land Forces.

Regards

Arthur

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