Jump to content
The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

MICHAEL RIDGE 1ST MUNSTERS LETTER


Ken Devitt
 Share

Recommended Posts

This letter was given to me some years ago by the grand nephew of Michael Ridge.

There are a few anomalies in it which I would very much appreciate your opinions on. It is very descriptive and accurate in many ways but a few of the details have me somewhat confused. Any ideas?

Michael Ridge: Private 4273 1st. Royal Munster Fusiliers?

Killed: 11.9.1918

Buried: Croisilles Railway Cemetery.

Thought you might be interested,

Ken.

post-7874-1128627194.jpg

post-7874-1128627235.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hello Ken,

Thanks for posting the letter. In my 'umble opinion, the letter is quite accurate.

With regard to the placards, this is from Tom Johnstone's Orange, Green and Khaki

Shortly afterwards (writing about early May 1916) the Germans on the front of 8th Munsters erected placards in connection with the Easter Rebellion. The Munsters, Catholic and Nationalist to a man, reacted with that extraordinary characteristic which bemuses and bewilders Englishmen (I love that bit :D ) First the Munsters replied by firing shots into the placards. Then they sang "God Save the King", confounding their enemy's 'knavish tricks'. That night a fighting patrol under Lt. F. J. Biggane 'cut their way through the enemy wire, straffed the Huns and captured both placards' The two placards were later presented by Lt.-Col. Williamson to King George V at an investure.......

On the gas attack at Hulluch, the 9th Royal Dublin Fusiliers were caught in a gas attack on the 27th of April and suffered heavy casualties.

The entry for Michael Ridge in Ireland's Memorial Records reads as follows:

Ridge, Michael. Reg. no. 4273. Rank Private, Royal Munster Fusiliers, 1st Battalion;

Killed in Action, France, September 11th, 1917; born Limerick.

If you would like a copy of the original, please send me a PM with your email address and I'll forward it on.

Regards,

Liam.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This letter was given to me some years ago by the grand nephew of Michael Ridge.

There are a few anomalies in it which I would very much appreciate your opinions on. It is very descriptive and accurate in many ways but a few of the details have me somewhat confused. Any ideas?

Michael Ridge: Private 4273 1st. Royal Munster Fusiliers?

Killed: 11.9.1918

Buried: Croisilles Railway Cemetery.

Thought you might be interested,

Ken.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hello Ken,

              Thanks for posting the letter. In my 'umble opinion, the letter is quite accurate.

With regard to the placards, this is from Tom Johnstone's Orange, Green and Khaki

Shortly afterwards (writing about early May 1916) the Germans on the  front of 8th Munsters erected placards in connection with the Easter Rebellion. The Munsters, Catholic and Nationalist to a man, reacted with that extraordinary characteristic which bemuses and bewilders Englishmen (I love that bit :D ) First the Munsters replied by firing shots into the placards. Then they sang "God Save the King", confounding their enemy's 'knavish tricks'. That night a fighting patrol under Lt. F. J. Biggane 'cut their way through the enemy wire, straffed the Huns and captured both placards' The two placards were later presented by Lt.-Col. Williamson to King George V at an investure.......

On the gas attack at Hulluch, the 9th Royal Dublin Fusiliers were caught in a gas attack on the 27th of April and suffered heavy casualties.

The entry for Michael Ridge in Ireland's Memorial Records reads as follows:

Ridge, Michael. Reg. no. 4273. Rank Private, Royal Munster Fusiliers, 1st Battalion;

Killed in Action, France, September 11th, 1917; born Limerick.

If you would like a copy of the original, please send me a PM with your email address and I'll forward it on.

Regards,

Liam.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

new to the forum and new to research

just last week i started research into my grandfather james radford 4367 royal munster fusiliers but can any one tell me how i find out what battallion he was in i already downloaded his mic but am unable to get from ireland to kew just yet

have found this site fascinating since i came across it yesterday

s radford

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hello S Radford and Welcome to the Forum :)

The only definitive way to determine his Battalion would be to look it up in the original Medal Rolls in the National Archive, Kew. If you can't make it over there, you could try posting a request in the I'm going to the NA section of the forum. Be warned, however, that most people who go there already have a lot of their own lookups to do, so you may not get a response - always worth a try, though. His Service Record may also exist in Kew, but I am afraid the odds are against you on that one :( .

One option is to post up his MIC here and let us have a look at it. The MIC gurus may be able to add a bit of information.

Regards and good hunting!

Liam.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hello S Radford and Welcome to the Forum :)

                                                              The only definitive way to determine his Battalion would be to look it up in the original Medal Rolls in the National Archive, Kew. If you can't make it over there, you could try posting a request in the I'm going to the NA section of the forum. Be warned, however, that most people who go there already have a lot of their own lookups to do, so you may not get a response - always worth a try, though. His Service Record may also exist in Kew, but I am afraid the odds are against you on that one :( .

One option is to post up his MIC here and let us have a look at it. The MIC gurus may be able to add a bit of information.

Regards and good hunting!

Liam.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks guys,

But according to Tom Johnstone it was the 8th Munsters who were in the trenches when the Germans put up the boards, and the 8th Dublins who were gassed. If Michael had his helmet on, then how come most of the Dublins who died also had their helmets on?

Many thanks,

Ken

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hello Ken,

              Thanks for posting the letter. In my 'umble opinion, the letter is quite accurate.

With regard to the placards, this is from Tom Johnstone's Orange, Green and Khaki

Shortly afterwards (writing about early May 1916) the Germans on the  front of 8th Munsters erected placards in connection with the Easter Rebellion. The Munsters, Catholic and Nationalist to a man, reacted with that extraordinary characteristic which bemuses and bewilders Englishmen (I love that bit :D ) First the Munsters replied by firing shots into the placards. Then they sang "God Save the King", confounding their enemy's 'knavish tricks'. That night a fighting patrol under Lt. F. J. Biggane 'cut their way through the enemy wire, straffed the Huns and captured both placards' The two placards were later presented by Lt.-Col. Williamson to King George V at an investure.......

On the gas attack at Hulluch, the 9th Royal Dublin Fusiliers were caught in a gas attack on the 27th of April and suffered heavy casualties.

The entry for Michael Ridge in Ireland's Memorial Records reads as follows:

Ridge, Michael. Reg. no. 4273. Rank Private, Royal Munster Fusiliers, 1st Battalion;

Killed in Action, France, September 11th, 1917; born Limerick.

If you would like a copy of the original, please send me a PM with your email address and I'll forward it on.

Regards,

Liam.

Many thanks for your reply Liam,

CWGC say 1918. His accounts reflect 8th Munsters. but he is entered as 1st Munsters. Just curious. Please send me whatever details you have at: ken.devitt@jspeed.net

Ken.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

new to the forum and new to research 

just last week i started research into my grandfather james radford  4367 royal munster fusiliers but can any one tell me how i find out what battallion he was in i already downloaded his mic but am unable to get from ireland to kew just yet 

have found this site fascinating since i came across it yesterday

s radford

His index card should tell you which battn. Usually at the top right after his name and rank but if you have no luck give me a shout.

ken

Link to comment
Share on other sites

His index card should tell you which battn. Usually at the top right after his name and rank but if you have no luck give me a shout.

Ken,

this isn't true for all MIC's though. There are only a small number that have the Battalion on them. I only have one MIC out of about 30 that has the Battalion on!!

What you need to do is look through the medal rolls for the British War and Victory medals.

You can find a researcher to do this for around £15.

Good luck

Anthony

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ken,

this isn't true for all MIC's though. There are only a small number that have the Battalion on them. I only have one MIC out of about 30 that has the Battalion on!!

What you need to do is look through the medal rolls for the British War and Victory medals.

You can find a researcher to do this for around £15.

Good luck

Anthony

Link to comment
Share on other sites

thanks for replying lads their is no battalion listed on the card only the medal roll and page

where will i find a researcher since i started this two weeks ago have been eating, sleeping,dreaming ww1

s radford

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks a lot guys,

Carefully studying the words is what makes history interseting. Do you perhaps think that Michael was relating what he had heard but not actually seen.

Many thank for the interest,

Ken

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 9 years later...

to confirm, Ridge was an original member of the 8th Munsters - his 1914/15 Star medal Embarkation date is 17th December 1915 when the Bn landed in France, 47th Bde, 16th (Irish) Division). This was the only battalion of the regiment where Limerick men were more numerous than those from Cork, the largest county in the recruiting district in size and population. The 8th were therefore heavily recruited from Limerick.

In November 1916, the 8th were amalgamated with 1st Munsters who moved from 48th Bde to take its place in 47th (British War and Victory Medal Roll shows served with 8th, then 1st Bns). Ridge died in September 1917 in the sector just North of Cambrai to which the parent division moved after its participation in 3rd Ypres.

In Summary, if continuously present, he would have served in Loos Salient to late August 1916, Somme Ginchy Guillemont sector September 1916, then Messines sector, October 1916, July 1917, Frezenberg Ypres, August, and Croisilles thereafter.

He was 1 of 2 men who died that day 11th September 1917 with 1RMF - the other was Thomas Brien, another ex 8th Bn man who died of wounds. The Bn War Diary states that it moved into the front line that night, replacing 7th Leinsters and had 1 KIA and 5 WIA from a working party due to a 'Pineapple Bomb'.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...