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Nurses Awarded Military Medals


Nick Thornicroft
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All of the above!

Except for the first one... especially if you ask my boss!

First- Search for Military Medal. Strangely enough it picks out nearly all of the issues with MMs in.

Second - Spreadsheet, muti-tabs. Copy and paste. Acrobat Reader 7.0, allows me to pick most of them out ok.

Third - The difficult bit. A combination of commands: LEN(), RIGHT(), LEFT(), CONCATENATE() allows me to split out the component parts of the entry - Number, rank, initials, surname, battalion, regiment, location.

Fourth - Sort by Regiment.

Easy, huh?

Except for the Gazette search converting Rs to either Es or Bs.

And some of the pages looking like they've got measles!

http://www.gazettes-online.co.uk/archiveVi...&selHonourType=

T560228 Spr. F. J. • Hatley, R.E:' (=Ke;n:tish

•'.Town):'" .':;; ! "„ •'•"- •" ' '', " ' '* *'"'*v

'B9fif29-3\6pl, T. "E. Hatib,LQnd..:R.-(S<Suthend).

•2Q45a-;Pte,;:A1'. H

*f fMeineririghani)'."

Spr... .(A../(

' ' '

R. . Hawke, .R.-E,

:5iq3^Pte..J. % Hawken, R.A.M-C. :(Pim-

45812. P£e. E,. Q. Haw.kes, Yse,o* (Bermpnd-:

Which of course is:

560228 Spr. F. J. Hatley, R.E. (Kentish Town)

590293 Cpl. T. E. Hatt, Lond. R. (Southend).

20458 Pte. A. Hawbrook, N. & Derby. R. (Metheringham)

266872 Spr. (A./Cpl.) R. Hawke, R.E. (Truro)

510220 Pte. J. Hawken, R.A.M.C. (Pimlico)

45812 Pte. E. C. Hawkes, Yeo. (Bermondsey)

This is the worst page I've seen.... Sort that one out!

And we wonder why we can't find stuff in the Gazette.

Steve.

Yep its number 1) clever. Im used to MACs so favnt a clue on my home PC but Ill try to figure it out thanks . PS Ive only got 1 MM and I managed to find his gazette. mentions are also fun to search arnt they. I had 1 with the certificate in front of me and still took ages to find it. Others Ive got I think were self awarded as they are neither in the LG or Nat. Archives. A common problem Im led to beleive.

Anyway have fun but do stop for the odd beer. best wishes

Gareth

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  • 6 months later...

Just reading an article on Catherine Murray Roy. C.B.E., R.R.C., M.M. The Matron-in-Chief, Q.A.I.M.N.S., died at the Western Infirmary, Glasgow, on 14th August 1976. Appointed on 3rd August 1909, she was Matron-in-Chief from 1938-1940.

Together with six other members of the Nursing Service, she was awarded the M.M. "for conspicuous gallantry displayed in the performance og her duties on the occasion of hostile raids on Casualty Clearing Stations in the Field" in the L.G. 17 October 1917. She was mentioned in despatches (L.G. 29 May 1917), awarded the R.R.C. (L.G. 1 January 1919), and received the C.B.E. in 1940. She was also the holder of the French Medaille Militaire des Epidemies.

Andy

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HB DCM's saying that there was an article in the OMRS Journal got me digging out a few old ones, the roll appears in a 1984 Journal and mentions 135 MM's awarded to women totally for WW1, including some awarded to French and American Nurses.

Andy

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Andy

I haven't seen the article mentioned, but have compiled a database of all British and Commonwealth MMs to women, with citations for all except two, and photographs of many of them. I've also recently looked at documents at the NA about the decision to award the MM to women, which are extremely enlightening - not least because it initially stemmed from the actions of Emilienne Moreau at Loos in September 1915 - so we have to thank the French, not the British :rolleyes:

Sue

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Sue,

Do you want the article scanned and sent over to you?? Also digging through a few of the OMRS Journals there are a fair few pictures of nurses with MM ribbons on their uniform

Eleanor Jean Thompson

Mary Agnes Crawford Blair

Mary Jane Derrer

Edith Hounslow

Margaret Heudebourck Ballance

Mabel Adeline Chittock

Molly McGinnis

Catherine Warner

Mary Stubbs

Articles I have located are the Roll of Women (127 and 8 Honorary)

Miss Mary Stubbs with pictures of the medals and her wedding to Captain John Harvie and Honours and Awards to Staff of the St. John Ambulance Brigade Hospital 1915-1919.

Andy

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Andy

I think I've probably got the same photos of them all except Molly McGinnis - I don't seem to have her, so would be grateful for that one. The image of Mabel Chittock that you've posted is the same as mine, so probably the rest are the 'official' ones.

I'd be particularly interested to confirm the names of the 'honoraries' particularly if Miss Delobel is one of them :rolleyes: [please tell me Miss Delobel is one of them!] , and also Miss Stubbs wedding.

I'll send an email address off-list

Regards

Sue

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Hi Sue,

I am sorry to say that Miss Delobel is not among the Honorary ones listed.

The ones listed for Honorary M.M.'s are:-

De Canisy

Dhellin

Dubar

Lesne

MacDonald

Parmalee

Verbruggche

Wambregue

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Andy

That's really interesting, as Emilienne Moreau is not in the list either, and she definitely was awarded one - the first one in fact, so those on the list are, perhaps, 'honorary' is the strictest sense. But in that case there are some such as Miss Moreau missing from the list. Miss Delobel is mentioned by the King in private correspondence as having committed some act of bravery 'early in the war' and I tend to feel that she was probably Belgian rather than French, and her actions took place during the very early days - but that's just conjecture.

Does anyone else have details of Miss Delobel and her act of bravery?

Sue

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Sue,

I will scan these articles and the list and get it sent off to you for your perusal.

Andy

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Sue,

There is a further note on one of the articles mentioning Moreau

MOREAU, Mademoiselle Emilienne. Presented at The British Embassy, Paris, on 28 July 1916.

A letter to Sir Edward Grey from The British Embassy in Paris which states, inter alia:-

I have the honour to inform you that this morning in the presence of the Staff of His Majesty's Embassy, I handed to Mademoiselle Emilienne Moreau, the "heroine of Loos", the Military Medal and the Medal of the Order of Jerusalem.

Andy

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Sue,

All sent, enjoy the reading.

Andy

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Many thanks to Andy who has just earned the 'devotion to scanning' award, for sending all those sheets. And not forgetting Norman [Royal Red Cross] who wrote the original article in the Journal of the Orders and Medals Research Society, and which I've now been able to read, with an especially clear explanation of why it had to be an MM and not a DCM or MC.

Sue

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Recently come to this thread. And recently rescued a book from ebay called "Red Herrings of 1918" by R. J. Pennell, M.M. (formerly Josephine Pennell). No publishing info on this paperback but ISBN 0 58936 242 6.

This from the "blurb" on the back:-

"The Military Medal was awarded to twelve members of the BRCS convoy of St Omer for their services during a night air raid on the town in May [actually Sunday April 14th 1918, during the Battle of the Lys, hence my interest], when the Germans were pushing the allied armies towards the coast in an effort to separate them. St Omer, a railway junction, was crowded with refugees and British wounded, and was very heavily bombed. The convoy was called out to collect the wounded and dying, to carry them to the nearest hospitals through the blacked out town.

Later General Prumer [sic], Second Army, decorated twelve of them with the ribbon of the MM then "in the field" [3rd July] and they later received their medals from H.M. King George V at Buckingham Place"

The citation quoted in the book reads:-

"The King has approved the award of the Military Medal to the undermentioned ladies for distinguished service in the field. In each case the acts of bravery were performed during enemy air-raids on hospitals.

Miss Thompson, Miss E. Courtis, Miss Richardson, Miss O'Connel-Bianconi, Miss E. Dickinson, Miss Callender all F.A.N.Y. All these ladies were out with their cars during the raid, picking up and in every way assisting the wounded and injured. They showed great bravery and coolness, and were an example to all ranks.

Miss Fabling, Miss W. Elwes, Miss J Pennell, Miss M. Davidson, all V.A.D. All these ladies were out with their cars during the raid, picking up and in every way assisting the wounded and injured. They showed great bravery and coolness, and were an example to all ranks. They also carried to safety and helped in every way French civilians."

Only eleven names in the citation in the book I'm afraid. A brief skim revealed no mentioned of being told of the award prior to the presentation. There's a good description of events at St Omer. The citation entry does say "A special supplement of the London Gazette was issued last night" - presumably 2nd July 1918

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London Gazette 30-7-1918

Miss Muriel Thompson, F.A.N.Y.

Miss Winifred Millicent Elwes, F.A.N.Y.

Miss Elsie Agnes Courtis, F.A.N.Y.

Miss Mary Richardson, F.A.N.Y.

Miss Mollie O'Connell-Bianconi, F.A.N.Y.

Miss Hilda May Dickinson, F.A.N.Y.

Miss Elizabeth Beveridge Callander, F.A.N.Y.

For conspicuous devotion to duty during an hostile air raid. All these lady drivers were out with their cars during the raid, picking up and in every way assisting the wounded and injured. They showed great bravery and coolness, and were an example to all ranks.

Miss Katherine Fabling.

Miss Stella Dickson.

Miss Josephine Pennell.

Miss Margaret Davidson, B.R.C.S.

(V.A.D.).

For conspicuous devotion to duty during an hostile air raid. All these lady drivers were out with their cars during the raid, picking up and in every way assisting the wounded and injured, and showed great bravery and coolness, and were an example to all ranks.

They also carried to safety and helped in every way many French civilians.

Link to Gazette Page:

http://www.gazettes-online.co.uk/archiveVi...&selHonourType=

There is a difference in the 2nd list between "Miss ElweS" and "Miss Dickson". Counting Misses Dickson and Elwes as two that could be 12.

Or:

The "twelfth lady" may be:

Commandant Winifred Eleanor Sarah Mount Batten, B.R.C.S.

For gallantry and devotion to duty during an enemy air raid. She superintended the work of the convoy, drove an ambulance car herself during the raid, and by her coolness and disregard for her own safety ensured the prompt removal of tte wounded to hospital.

Steve.

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I've now been able to read, with an especially clear explanation of why it had to be an MM and not a DCM or MC.

Sue

Can you recall why it had to be the MM? Phil B

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so we have to thank the French, not the British :rolleyes:

We also have them to thank, in a round about way, for the VC. Can't let these foreigners be ahead of us in having rewards what what?

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Can you recall why it had to be the MM? Phil B

I really hope so Phil, as it was only an hour ago that I read it :unsure:

I'm not sure whether it's good form to publish Norman's article here - I'm sure it would be a great benefit for everyone to read it, but I'll leave it for him to do that if he thinks suitable. But in the main it revolves around insensitivity to existing holders [male] of other awards, and the status of women as civilians at that time.

Having read through a lot of the correspondence myself recently between the King and others relating to the award to women, it seems clear that at that time it was seen as an award to 'female civilians' first and foremost, as a way of rewarding the actions of women such as Emilienne Moreau, in a situation where the Royal Red Cross was no longer thought to be the right award for gallantry. In these papers there seems to be no thought that nurses or members of other medical services were particularly likely to be recipients, and there is considerable soul searching over whether male civilians should be similarly decorated.

At that time [almost] all women were civilians - I use the 'almost' as there has been recent discussion on another mailing list as to the status of the 8 Canadian recipients of the award. But in early/mid 1916 it seems that French and Belgian civilians were those thought to be the most likely recipients of the award, and the MM to be right for the occasion.

Sue

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I'm only 25% of the way through indexing the MMs in the Gazette but here's (some of) the MMs awarded to Nurses up to 1917:

4-9-1916

The Lady Dorothie Mary Evelyn Feilding (Monro Motor Ambulance).

Matron Miss Mabel Mary Tunley, R.R.C., Q.A.I.M.N.S.

Sister Miss Beatrice Alice Allsop, Q.A.I.M.N.S. (R.).

Sister Miss Norah Easeby, Q.A.I.M.N.S. (R.).

Staff Nurse Miss Ethel Hutchinson,

Staff Nurse Miss Jean Strachan Whyte, T.F., N.S.

Two others awarded in 1916 were to Elsie Knocker (aka Baroness Elizabeth de T'Serclaes) and Mairi Chisholm, the 'Women of Pervyse'. Mrs Knocker was a trained nurse but Mairi Chisholm was not, although auxiliary nursing - along with ambulance driving, retrieving wounded men, and general care and welfare work - was the reason for her award.

Lady Dorothie Feilding wasn't a nurse either - at least not a formally trained nurse, although she too did nursing work when required. She was primarily an ambulance driver. Am I right in thinking that she was the first woman awarded the MM? I have a copy of a letter dated Windsor Castle, 19 August 1916, from Lord Stamfordham to Lieutenant-General Sir Francis Davies, Military Secretary, which reads:

Dear Davies,

I have spoken to the King and His Majesty quite agrees with you that Lady Dorothie Feilding ought to receive the Military Medal and not the Royal Red Cross.

Yours very truly

Stamfordham

regards

Mick

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Just a quick question. I have the list of the eight Canadian recipients of the MM, but an earlier entry on this thread lists A/Sister Marie Dow Lutwick,QAIMNS ® Can. I am aware of the meaning of the initials including the ® indicating Reserve, but the entry "Can" after the other initials has me wondering if Lutwick was Canadian. I have often seen that entry. Can anyone clarify this? Many Canadian nurses served not in the CAMC but in various British organizations, and many others served with the US Army.

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Terry

I've always understood that Marie Lutwick was a Canadian serving with the British nursing service, but I haven't got any evidence to back that up. She has a file at the National Archives, and I'll have a look at it next time I'm there.

Mick

The first MM was awarded to Emilienne Moreau - on 28th July 1916. Dorothy Feilding's was an odd one, as it was not given for a single act of gallant/brave conduct, but as a reward for a prolonged period of 'service.'

The citation reads [and any spelling errors are not mine!]:

Lady Dorithie Fielding as a member of the Monro Motor Ambulance Corps, attached to the Belgian Army, served with the Naval Siege Guns, and attended to the wounded on every occasion of firing from February 1915 to March, 1916. She has always displayed great coolness under fire, courage and devotion to duty, and an utter contempt of danger, which has been a source of admiration to all.

I don't want to diminish her actions in any way, but do wonder if her title/status had any bearing on her award.

Sue

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How nice after my return from 3 weeks in the Middle East to see you all quoting me and offering copies of my article in the OMRS Journal. What fame !!

Marie Dow Lutwick was born at Alma, New Brunswick, Canada. Nevertheless, she decided to serve with the QA Reserve.

The question of the MM for nurses was basically to do with the fact that women had been specifically made eligible for the MM by an alteration in it's warrant. They were not eligible for other awards such as the MC.

Even before the first awards of the MM to men were published, Ponsonby was writing to Brade at the War Office

"The King is thinking of adding a paragraph to the Warrant whereby women could be eligible for this medal. There have been one or two isolated cases of bravery by French and Belgian women and Lord Balfour has now brought forward the case of Mlle. Moreau who has been awarded the Croix de Guerre by the French."

On 8th May, a further letter to Brade states

"His Majesty, however, has quite decided that it would be best to add a clause to the Warrant entitling women to the MM. The King says we shall have to women rewards for bravery and at present we have absolutely nothing to give. Will you therefore do as I asked and have a clause added to this effect to the Warrant instituting the MM. "

I have some detail on all the MMs awarded to women in the 1st and 2nd World Wars.

Norman

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Norman,

A good article to quote from, very informative indeed. Had to dig through my OMRS journals a long time to find it but very worthwhile.

Andy

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  • 2 months later...

Hi folks,

I was chatting to my manager earlier about family history etc, and she told me that her great-aunt, Annie Weir won the Military Medal in WW1. I managed to find her in the Gazette of 18/12/1917, but I also came across a Miss Annie Weir in the gazette of 1/1/1919 as being awarded the Royal Red Cross 2nd Class. This second award was to the TFNS, the MM being to the BRCS (VAD). Can anyone tell me if this is the same Annie Weir? I'm also looking for her MIC and have found four that could match, although I'm not sure which one would be hers.

After reading this thread, and that there were only 120 or so of these medals given to women, how much would they be worth today? My manager is afraid to find out, as her aunt managed to 'lose' all her medals at some point. If anyone can shed some light on this it would be much appreciated. I think my boss is going to bring in some newspaper clippings she has which I will share with you when I get them.

Thanks in advance,

Barrie

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Annie McKenzie WEIR was a member of the Lanarkshire No. 24 detachment of the BRCS, so she was a VAD. Her MM was for bravery at No. 58 General Hospital, at St. Omer on 30 September 1917 during a raid by enemy aircraft.

She served first in the UK at 1st Scotish General Hospital, Aberdeen and then in France from 14 June 1917 to 21 March 1919.

She was mentioned in the despatch of FM Sir Douglas Haig dated 7 November 1917 published in the London Gazette of 24 december 1917 and was also awarded the BRCS Special Service Cross.

Norman

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