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sandyford

Mr & Mrs Taylor of Lincoln.

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sandyford

This photo, labelled 'Mr. & Mrs Taylor of Cranwell St. Lincoln, good friends to the wounded 1914 - 18' was among my father's possessions.

When he was in hospital, in 1915 & 16, Mr. & Mrs Taylor invited relatives, travelling to Lincoln to stay, sometimes for as long as a week. My impression is that other families benefited from their kindness.

I think Mr. & Mrs Taylor may have been voluntary hospital visitors or possibly connected with the church.

Even after he was discharged, they kept in touch, and my mother & he stayed there again in 1918.

This post is just to acknowledge unsung helpers of WW1.

Kate

post-2045-1127834425.jpg

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cockney tone

Kate,

a nice little 'human interest' story, how many more there must be we will never know, thanks for posting it,

Regards,

Scottie.

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sandyford

Scottie

Thanks for looking.

When I was thinking about Mr. & Mrs Taylor, it seems that they must have been unpaid for having relatives to stay - or perhaps just a nominal payment for breakfast.

It was a big struggle for anyone in my family to have afforded the rail fare to Lincoln, never mind somewhere to stay.

Also, the Taylors don't seem to have lived in a very grand house, if the photo is taken beside it.

Kate

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cockney tone

Kate,

would be nice to no more about them, wonder if they had children, or if they had anybody at the front?

Regards

Scottie.

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KONDOA

Cranwell Street still exists. It is one of the many streets of terraced houses that developed during the Victorian industrial expansion in the south of the city. It would not be starange to consider their family are still in the area.

Roop

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Stephen Nulty

I had a look at an 1890 map of the area but Cranwell Street wasn't there at the time. I also looked at the description of the Enumeration District in the 1901 census (Boultham), but again couldn't find the street.

So without over 5,000 people with the surname Taylor in Lincolnshire in 1901, some more information on Mr & Mrs Taylor would be needed to help identify them.

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KONDOA

Stephen, It appears to be in St Botolph not Boultham

REF: RG12 / 2589 FOLIO: 146 PLACE: Lincoln - St Botolph

Roop

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sandyford

Thank you so much for trying to find the Taylors on the census.

Have just looked in another diary and have found that the Taylors lived at 16 Cranwell St. Unfortunately the address section does not have a clear initial. I will post it to see what you think of the initial.

There are mentions of Mrs Taylor writing to my mother, but I have not found these letters, unfortunately.

The house behind them in the photo looks like many of the terrace houses in Newcastle and my father's family would have felt right at home. Possibly they were built just after 1890.

Just after they got married my father & mother went there to stay for a week. The house seemed to be within walking distance of the 4th Northern General Hospital & also of the cathedral.

After being in 4th Northern General Hospital, my father was convalescent at Boultham Hall & I had always imagined the hall was outside of Lincoln.

Kate

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sandyford

Address section of my mother's diary 1918.

See what you think about the initial.

post-2045-1127943716.jpg

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Frank_East

Cranwell Street is situated on the west side of the bottom of the High Street.The area on the other side is Sincil Bank,the home of Lincoln City F.C and another maze of terraced houses. All the terraced houses in these areas have similar frontages.

The next street towards town is Dixon Street which leads to the now inner ring road, Tritton Road and to the now Boultham Park.Boultham Park,a public park is what is left of Col R.G. Ellison's residence,Boultham Hall.The Hall was demolished in the mid fifties and the park fell into ownership by Lincoln Council who recently announced plans to refurbish the park after years of deterioration.

Cranwell Street and Boultham Hall would be in close proximity to each other and within a short walking distance which would account for the Taylors being drawn towards those convalescing at Boultham Park.

I do not know where the No 4 Northern General Hospital was situated but the walk from Cranwell to Lincoln Cathedral is quite lengthy.The climb up Steep Hill would be a test for anyone recovering from injuries.

Regards

Frank East

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sandyford

Frank

I am not sure where 4th Northern General was exactly, but I know it was somewhere near to Steep Hill, because the patients used to like to tempt fate by going out from the hospital onto the hill in their wheelchairs (pushed by others of course.)

I don't think the family visited him at Boultham Hall because he was just there for a short time. probably he himself didn't walk up the hill, just his visitors did.

Inspired by everyone's help in finding out about Mr. & Mrs Taylor, I searched the online Historical Directories and found Herbert Taylor, pattern maker, living in Cranwell St. in Ruddocks Directory for 1911.

post-2045-1127950624.jpg

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Alison Arnold

Found them on the 1901 census.

Herbert age 28 Born Lincoln Pattern maker ( there is a bit after this that I can't make out)

Ada H age 27 Born Lincoln.

So no children at this point. Will do a little more digging after the school run!

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Alison Arnold

Kate,

Ada H could be Ada Hannah Peacock who married a Herbert Taylor in the June quarter of 1898 in Lincoln. I have found both of them on the 1881 census both living in large families.

Ali

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j.r.f

PALS

Can I recamend to you a series of books called A TOWN REMEMBERS.At his moment there are two books.Volume one is about those remembered on the BOSTON WAR MEMORIAL.Thats BOSTON LINCOLNSHIRE and not the one in the U.S.A..It is written by WILLIAM HUNT AND PUBLISHED BY RICHARD KAY of 80 SLEAFORD ROAD BOSTON LINCS..PE21 8EU..This is the most comprehensive war memorial book that I have ever read.The biographical in formation that it contains is truelly incredible.In my opinion thios is a work of national importance.There is also a second volume about the fallen of WW2,and in preparation a third volume which .I am told, will be about any errors in vols 1 and 2 but also about those that should be on the memorials but are not.I am looking forward to this publication.

I live in Bristol and only came across these voluimes when my sister sent me vol 1 as a present.I read it from cover to cover.The information gleaned from it was incredible.I think that BOSTON was uni9que at the time of the FIRST WORLD WAR in so fgar as it was still a backwater and little affected by the industrial movement of population that was happening to the rest of the country.So, as it were,preserved in aspick we have a comparitively large town whos inhabitants can,could be, traced.In years to come this series of books may be used to study people immediatly befor and after the 1 WORLD WAR.

FINALLY THERE IS ONLY ONE taylor family noted in thie first book and they are not the ones that have been refered to on this thread.

SORRY PALS AM GOING ON AGAIN.

CHEERS.

JOHN :D

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sandyford

Ali,

Excellent detective work. I am sure that is them.

After reading your post, I got a family member to download the census. It is quite surprising that Herbert was 28 in 1901 which makes him about 45 on the photograph. I think Herbert was a pattern maker in an iron foundry - a skilled job.

If Herbert & Ada got married in 1898 & had no children by 1901, it doesn't seem that they got involved with hospital volunteering after having a child wounded or killed in WW1.

Perhaps other family members had been wounded - or perhaps they never had any children (there are no children on the photo, probably 1918) and were just people who liked to help others.

It is incredible to me that we have been able to find out so much about this couple with just a photo & address.

You should all be on 'The Bill'.

:D

Kate

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sandyford

A picture taken outside Boultham Hall, 2nd April 1916, of my father, about to be taken out in a bath chair for the first time after almost a year in 4th Northern General hospital.

All people on this photo look to me as though they are contemplating mischief, like going on Steep Hill.

kate

post-2045-1128004332.jpg

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Alison Arnold

Hi Kate,

Could be due to a family member being killed or injured they are both from fairly large families. I have found them both on the 1881 census both aged 8 and so far I have possibly got Ada on the 1891 but not Herbert.

It could also have been their own contribution to the war effort.

That picture of your father is great.

Ali

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Frank_East

Kate,More on Boultham Hall and Park.

I think in the era of the Great War,it would have been possible to walk from Cranwell Street to Boultham Hall and Park over the fields as the area although within the city boundary was quite rural.

Hall Drive is the primary access to Boutham Park and the former Boutlham Hall surviving from the Great War but I cannot confirm it was named as a "Drive" during the Great War.It is off the now and post Great War Boutham Park Road.Along Hall Drive, bridging the Catchwater Drain is a bridge which still exists and was called the "Soldier's Bridge" or "Soldiers Lump", (not much of a lump now) where convalescenting soldiers exercised to what was the boundary of the convalescent unit and reported to be the favourite place for a good smoke.

There is still a magificent view of Lincoln Cathedral in all its majesty from the "Soldiers Bridge".It must have been even better before the post Great War development although it is probably 1.5 miles in the distance

Your father must have passed this way up Hall Drive and crossed "Soldier's Bridge" to visit the city or its cathedral.Even so to get to the cathedral,it would need some sturdy hands to manhandle a bathchair up Steep Hill.

Regards

Frank East

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sandyford

Frank

I like the sound of Soldiers' Bridge. The day when wounded soldiers were able to have their first smoke seemed to be an occasion of great rejoicing, & a sign of returning health.

I have visited Lincoln once or twice but now I will have more places to go and look at.

Another place mentioned was Cobb Hall. This may have been in Boston and if so might be mentioned in the book John has talked about.

Sorry, John. I have just seen your posting. I will have to reread the diaries to see what was said about Boston because this was also an area where my father was sent.

Ali. Is it possible to look for Herbert's parents in 1891 to see if he was with them. Sorry, I am not being lazy. it's just that I haven't got access to these programmes at the moment.

kate

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Alison Arnold

Hi Kate,

Yes he was still with them and working as a pattern maker. They are living at 59 Portland Street.

William Taylor Head Age 49 Engine Fitters ? (can't read last word)

Francis M Wife Age 49

Arthur son Age 20 Engineers Apprentice

Herbert son Age 18 Pattern Maker

Albert son Age 16 Solicitors Clerk

Ernest son Age 15 Clerk

Fanny Dau Age 11 Scholar

They were at the same address in 1881.

Hope this helps

Ali

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Alison Arnold

And for your information is Ada's family on the 1881 census:

Thomas Peacock Head Age 36 Gamekeeper

Mary A Dau Age 11 Scholar

John T Son Age 9 Scholar

Ada H Dau Age 8 Scholar

Emily R Dau Age 7

Alfred R Son Age 5

William Ed Son Age 4

Sarah J Dau Age 2

Thomas Son Age 4 months

Annie Oxby Servant Age 34

They were living at Peacock Cottage, Ashby De La Laund, Lincolnshire

The only Ada living in the Lincoln area I can pick up on the 1891 census is an Ada A Peacock. The entry is as follows:

Henry Woodliffe Head age 57 Merchants Clerk

Mary A Wife age 57

Ada A Peacock age 17 General Servant (Domestic)

Ali

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Alison Arnold

To complete the picture Ada's father Thomas in the 1891 census

Thomas Peacock Head age 47

Emma Wife age 40 (shows as Elizabeth on the 1901 census)

John T Son age 19 Agricultural labourer

Sarah Jane Dau age 12 Scholar

Ellen Dau age 8 scholar

Joseph Son age 6 scholar

Thomas son age 3

Benjamin son age 11 months.

I am wondering whether they lost the first son could Thomas as he should be around 10 by the time of the 1891 census.

Ali

Edited by Alibee

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sandyford

Ali

Just what I wanted to know.

I had wondered if Ada Peacock might have been a nurse before she married, hence the hospital connection, but it doesn't look as though that is the case.

I like the sound of the Peacocks living at Peacock cottage, and Mr. Peacock being a gamekeeper. Peacock cottage may have been an estate house.

Both of the Taylors seem to have come from quite large families - so it is possible that there are still relatives around, who might even google up this thread at some time in the future. It has happened to me once or twice with forum postings.

Although I'm sure they knew they were appreciated at the time, Herbert and Ada Taylor's contribution to the welfare of some of the wounded soldiers of WW1 has been given some recognition and acknowledgement by everyone's discussion and research.

Kate

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Steve Bramley

Kate,

Why don't you try dropping a line to the Museum of Lincolnshire Life? They are very proud of their engineering heritage in Lincoln, if the amount of engineering medals in the museum foyer is anything to go by.

I have always found the staff there to be very helpful, and you never know what longshots can produce.

One of the major firms in Lincoln was Ruston Bucyrus, Herbert may have worked for them, follow the link below:

R-B

And don't forget Fosters of Lincoln, makers of Water Tanks For Mesopotamia!

Steve.

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sandyford

Steve

Thanks for the link.

The museum certainly sounds very promising. Since getting the info. from this thread, I have found out a little about the skills involved in pattern making and I think Herbert would have been held in high regard in the company he worked for.

Kate

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