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Name Query Theydon Bois


Boreenatra
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Does anybody have any local or census information re John Pearson. His father is listed on the stone as Frederick Pearson, but his records seem to indicate his dad as M.T. Pearson. I know there was a trend for using different names then but would anybody have any family details. Perhaps Patrick H has some info. Credit to Geoff Gillon for spotting this. Regards Steve.

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Steve, I dont know anything about this man and have never actually looked around the Theydon Bois cemetary. Is this at St Marys ? As for Theydon Bois my intention was, once I have finished with all the Warley names, I then intend to go onto Abridge Memorial (this being my "home" village and 2 miles from T Bois, and Abridge has 2 of my Greygoose ancestors. Only then (whenever that might be) would I go onto T Bois.

Can I ask you, are you going round all the local cemeteries taking photographs and if so are you looking for something specific ?

Patrick

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Steve

I just had a quick glance at the 31 pages for Theydon Bois in the 1901 census and can’t find a Pearson family. I’ll dig a little deeper and see where they were.

I noticed that on the stone it appears to say that Frederick died in 1834 and yet his “son” John was only 22 when he died in 1917. Looks like something is wrong with the dates….or my eyes !!

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hi,

I am not getting anything on this family. Can't bring them up on the 1901 census. Does he appear on the Theydon Bois war memorial. I can't access his details on the CWGC at the moment as it just keeps going back to the search page.

I will keep trying.

Stephen I think the headstone reads 1934 put it down to mildew on the stone making the 9 look like an 8!!

Best wishes

Ali

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Patrick and Steve, Thanks for your replies. Yes the Pearson stone was in St.Mary's and Steve, sorry mate it's the old eyes it is I934. You can have a blow up if you want. The reason for the London / Essex thing is just something I was looking at to see if I could take a cross section of 75 to 100 Churchyards & Cemeteries to see if I can come up with some statistics regarding what I call "commemoratives" ( there are organisations that use a different reference) i.e. stones that would commemorate a service man or woman who was KIA / MIA or maybe some other circumstance whereby they may buried in France , Belgium or elsewhere in recognised war graves, but are honoured here by relatives and friends. Bearing in mind ( and I'm not sure of the correct numbers here ) that in two world wars there were 775,000 not found, I figured that many of them, give or take those whose families could not afford headstones, would probably be on stones somewhere. Also from a research point of view, if you find a stone such as one in Dagenham St. Peter & Paul Church that lists six grandsons who died in WW1 and many more of the family details then that becomes a great help if you are researching a particular family. A CWGC stone will tell you name no. and regiment but little else. Their records do sometimes hold more info but not always. I feel strongly about these memorials because they seem to hold no status with either the CWGC or the BWMP. As I say its a personal thing and if I can help folks like Jim Strawbridge and Peter Bennett and the BWMP then it makes it worthwhile for me. The only conditions I set myself are that I confine it to WW1 and if I come across Boer or Crimea war stones ( which happens every so often) then so much the better. I know a lot of people have their own thoughts on these sorts of things and I don't ask any one to subscribe to my viewpoint, but I personally think that if a stone or memorial commemorates any one who died in conflict, whether they are buried there or not, then in my estimation that should be classed as a war commemoration. The CWGC puts date limits on war graves and for whatever reason that was initiated, well then for them thats fine. For me, any death due to conflict should have an equal status. The BWMP wants only to deal with British servicemen and does not consider "foreign" graves. Again if that is part of their remit then again that is fine with me. Both organisations do fantastic work and I know lots of forum members do contribute in various ways. We should be the eyes and ears so they can take action where needed. Perhaps my project may lead to an untold story ,I don't know. There may be others doing the same thing. I feel it is also good for the soul and again for me keeps the memory alive. It probably is a similar thing to your war memorial project. Is there any other motivation for you, other than the Greygoose thing we talked about some time ago, that makes you do what you do? As nice as Upminster is ( depending on your point of view) on a good day, i'd rather tramp around some country churchyard than go in to work. I even found a WW1 at Corbets Tey today I never knew existed before so things can't be that bad. In fact that probably is it in a nutshell, you never can tell. Steve, if your still hereafter all this, any help on the Pearson family greatly appreciated. Patrick if there are any local names that I might be able to help you with, give me a shout. Went to Woodman Road the other day and what a difference to Lorne Road !!!! Thanks again to you both for your replies Regards Steve.

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Steve

I've found tham on the 1901 census.

Living at the Prince Arthur, Caledonian Road, Islington, London.

Frederick Pearson, aged 59, born Acton, Suffolk. He is shown as a “Beer Retailer – Pub”

His wife Christina Pearson, aged 38, born Islington

Sons Frederick J Pearson, aged 9, and John Pearson, aged 5 and William J Pearson, aged 3, all born in Islington.

Edith Wilkinson (a servant), aged 20, born in Islington.

Based on the information on the gravestone, I would suggest that this is the man, although I'm not sure what it means with regard to the CWGC entry.

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Steve, thanks for that. I hope you didnt think I was in any way criticising you or what you are doing. I entirely agree with you, we all have our own personal hobbies and interests. I merely wondered why you were going aroudn to so many graveyards ! Incidentally when you next travel to my neck of the wood (theydon bois) have a look at Lambourne Church yard. Lovely old Norman(part) in beautiful setting and consider the poor state of the Cross of Sacrifice in the Church yard itself. You will see 2 Greygoose boys. If you travel from Romford via Havering Atte Bower, when you get to Passingford bridge roundabout take the Abridge Road. Shortly on right you will see Goulds Farm and after aerodrome on the left is Goulds Farm Cottages. Leo and Lawrence Greygoose lived in these cottages and went to Lambourne Church. Their father worked on the farm.

I have been to these boys graves in Adanac Cemetery and Auchex le petit both on the Somme. As my ancestors its a strange emotion to think of these boys laying here so far from their Essex village.

If you visit Woodman Road Cem again and yes what a difference to Lorne Rd, you might want to have a look at the grave of F C Carey Longmore. He was founder and Captain 1st Warley Company Boy's Brigade for 56 years. Some achievement! And he lived to see so many of his "boys" give their lives in 3 wars. His grave is- from the entrance take the right hand path and go to furtherst plot turn left and its about 5 or 6 in.

I am obviously interested in any photographs you take in Warley, Lambourne, Theydon Bois and anything to do with Greygoose family or The Boy's Brigade

Regards

Patrick

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Sorry Steve, I meant to give you directions to Lambourne Church. After you pass Gould Farm Cotts you will pass Patch Park, few hundred yards on left is road to Church, signposted. Its a long very narrow and winding road till you get to the top.

Patrick

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Patrick Thanks for your reply. No problem with asking mate, it's difficult at times to contain what you do to keep everything in reasonable bounds. I started off with 25 targetsd places and its mushroomed to 75 and the objective is 100 (maybe) It's easy enough with say St.Johns at Havering -atte- Bower and a lot of the local churches because they are fairly easy and interesting to search but whan you take on the City of London Cemetery for example with over 200 acres and many thousands of graves it becomes a bit daunting. But it is a means to an end so I will carry on. Thanks for the directions I will go there. When I went to Essex Uplands Church the other day I went right passed Lambourne and Abridge meaning to go in on the way back but ended up in Brentwood so I went to Woodman Road instead. Next time. I'll keep a look out for the Boys Brigade things. I did take one the other day and will sort through and pass it on. Regards Steve.

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EPPING Uplands at a guess! Slip of the brain?

There are obviously several people on this thread who have an interest in graveyards in this corner of Essex. I'll post my plea, then if anyone can help if they could PM me the rest of the thread can stay on track...

My father's infant sister died in December 1942 at St Margaret's Hospital, Epping. I've tried on and off for several years to find out where she was buried (or if any record survives of a cremation). There is no record of a burial at either church in Epping, and I've probably tried nearly everywhere else around. The problem is she was "taken away"because her mother died within a few days of the birth, and she had spina bifida, so she didn't die at home - she died on the other side of the county. To complicate matters, the family moved after the mother's death and the village postmaster RETURNED the letter to the hospital telling them the baby had died because it was sent to the old address!

Can anyone suggest anywhere else I can look for her?

Many thanks, and please accept my apologies for the hijack - you seem to know the area's graveyards as well as I do some in north Essex...

Adrian

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Patrick. Epping Upland is just west of Thornwood Common and north of Epping on the B181. Adrian ,these things are hugely difficult. We've been trying to find details of some infant mortalities in Ireland around 1894-1902 and are having very little success. Infants were often then in workhouses which doubled as hospitals. Because so many died at a very early age it seems impossible to track them down. The only thing is there must be some records somewhere so you must keep looking. Perhaps the Family Records Centre might put you on the right track. I would assume they would deal with these sort of things all the time. Perhaps someone on the forum would know. Good luck in your search. Regards Steve.

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