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Remembered Today:

Remembrance Service


eve
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Hi all

I am on a mission to ensure that the men on our Roll of Honour do not become just a list of names. My wish is that when someone's name is read out at least one person in the congragation will know what he looked like and will have some knowledge of his life and death. I thought that, if I printed individual cards for each man with his photograph and a potted biography and handed them out as people arrived for the service, they would have time to reflect on his sacrifice. I beleive it will make that part of the service more meaningful. Has anyone tried this? Any other ideas? (There are only about 27 men on the Roll of Honour so it is not a big task)

Evelyn

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Eve,

I think it is a wonderful idea, last year I was at a service of rememberance and all the children put a cross down as the names were called.

Good luck,

Mandy

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Excellent idea, Evelyn. I'm glad to know that you still read out the names. As you say, there was a time when every name would have meant something to someone. Your idea helps return to those days when they were more than just names.

Tom

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Thanks Mandy

I like the idea of the children placing croses as the names are read out. I am going to talk to the older Sunday School children the week before and I know the younger ones are making a banner with poppies to display in church on Remembrance Sunday. It's important to get the youngsters involved.

Tom - I had just assumed that the names were always read out. Is this not the case now?

Evelyn

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Tom - I had just assumed that the names were always read out.  Is this not the case now?

Evelyn

No, Evelyn, it isn't something which happens everywhere. I always attend the service at the memorial on which a relative is named. There are about 35 names. The names have never been called out in the 30+ years I've attended.

I read somewhere a few years ago that the reading out of names was a common practice once but the tradition had often been dropped. The writer noted that the reading out of names was being re-introduced at many memorials.

Tom

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That surprises me Tom. At the church I attend the Rolls of Honour for our parish and the neighbouring parish are read out( the other parish church is now closed). Wreaths are laid on the memorial outside our church. After the service we go to the other memorial and lay wreaths there. I'm sure the names are read out most years. But not to have heard your relative's name called out at the memorial in all these years is very sad.

Evelyn

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I agree, Evelyn. Our memorial is outside the parish church, and I'm going to write to the vicar to suggest that he starts reading out the names this year. Don't know why I haven't thought of this before!

Tom

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Eve,

I'm going to a Memorial Service in Perthshire on the 11th where newly printed photos of the men and women honoured and repainted panels of the RofH are to be dedicated. This is a renewal of the original 1920s photos and panels which had started to fade.

Reading out of names may take some time at our local Church - 157 names, worth asking though.

Aye

Malcolm

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hello

Whilst researching a Pte Budgett of the Cold Gds - the vicar of the church where is is buried sent me a copy of the memorial service where the names are read out

Ian

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Good for you Tom - I hope that the vicar takes it on board

Reading out of names may take some time at our local Church -  157 names, worth asking though.

Aye

Malcolm

Malcolm - even if the minister thought that 157 names was just too many to read out at one service, he/she could use say 30 names each year and rotate them. At least then each soldier would be named every 5 years which is better that not at all. Just a thought.

Evelyn.

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Agree - I went to an Remembrance Service a couple of years ago where the names where read, followed by Regiment. All OK until the chap got to a WW2 man who was in the Recconiassance Corps, which was spelt as "RECCE" on the memorial. He read out ...."Trooper Blank, R.E.C.C.E.". Aaagh.

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Hi Steve

I have only recently become interested in our Roll of Honour although I have attended the services for years. I might well have made the same mistake myself. :blink:

Evelyn

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Hi Steve

I have only recently become interested in our Roll of Honour although I have attended the services for years.  I might well have made the same mistake myself.  :blink:

Evelyn

As they say, Eve, "Time spent in recconaissance is seldom wasted" :D

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Hi all

I am on a mission to ensure that the men on our Roll of Honour do not become just a list of names.  My wish is that when someone's name is read out at least one person in the congragation will know what he looked like and will have some knowledge of his life and death.  I thought that, if I printed individual cards for each man with his photograph and a potted biography and handed them out as people arrived for the service,  they would have time to reflect on his sacrifice.  I beleive it will make that part of the service more meaningful.  Has anyone tried this?  Any other ideas?  (There are only about 27 men on the Roll of Honour so it is not a big task)

Evelyn

Evelyn,

Do it, please do it. What a splendid idea.....

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Evelyn

Wonderful idea. At Christ Church Warley Essex we have a Remembrance Service the contents of which became somewhat diluted over the years and the only real contribution was the Last Post and Revellie played by my Boy's Brigade buglers. Over the last few years we have restored the laying of wreaths at the Memorial Tablet inside the Church, but to most of the congregation the names on the tablet mean nothing.

At least we now have the Last Post, Exhortation, 2 minute Silence and wreath laying and the order of service does include referance to those who gave their lives.

I am intending having my research material laid out in the chancel this year so that anyone interested can have a look, but unfortunately it will not be finished this year.

Patrick

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Over here the poppy is unknown locally, but last December when I went to the Battle of the Bulge commemorations - at 5 a.m. I wore a poppy and laid a poppy wreath and the local schoolchildren all laid a candle - not one per man, but one per child.

Bear in mind that this was at 5 a.m. in sub-zero temperatures.

It's one way to get the children involved and if you have a lot of names on a memorial you can have one per name.

That's if candles haven't been banned as a safety hazard.

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