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The Aerodrome site 90% German?


Terry
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Some time ago I commented on the fact that the well known website www.theaerodrome.com seemed to be becoming more and more dedicated to all things German. Today I scrolled through the People section of the forum and it appeared that well over 90% of the entries dealt with the German air force.Now I am full of respect for the efforts of the men who flew for the Kaiser, but it would be nice to see a bit more balanced coverage of the Allied side. Then again, I am one of those who stopped contributing to the site so perhaps I have myself to blame!

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Terry,

I think there are several reasons because of the big interest in German personnel and planes.

If we look at the history of the British units, much has already been researched and written. Not meaning that there's no more work on the subject, not at all !

However if one looks to the German side, there is still so much that has to be put on paper. The Schlachtstaffeln, Feldflieger Abteilungen, Kagohl units, naval units.

Many of these archives were at Potsdam at the time and they are only now being rediscovered, some are gone forever. Only the history of a number of the Jasta's is written down.

And don't forget, the history of the German units is part of the history of your country also !

Which unit's bombed for example London, Kent or England, with what results ? How did the home units react ? By linking this information together it is finally possible to write history as it was in an almost neutral way. I think this is the most important for the generations that come behind us. They will actually be able to learn from history !

I'm very interested personally in a number of German units which operated from Flanders, but it becomes enormously more interesting when I'm able to link facts from here to facts in other units or in other books, such as the excellent one on 10 Sqdn RNAS by Mike Westrop.

We need more such books on both of the former enemies. Unfortunately the French are way behind to make the picture complete, and they only have to blame themselves.

So pick up that pen and start to write or to type on your computer. And don't run away from the Aerodrome, look closer, and you will find more than expected.

Best from Johan

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To add some "balance", here is a listing of recommended Great War websites compiled by the CEF Study Group.

Great War Air Force Websites - Part 13

Note: CEF Study Group member websites denoted with asterisk "*"

==============================================

The Story of World War 1 Aviation

The history of World War One aviation is a rich and varied story. It was marked by a period of very rapid technological development. This site is quite comprehensive.

http://www.wwiaviation.com/toc.shtml

Flieger Album - German Album of Photographs from Great War

All text in German. However, many excellent photographs of German aircraft, pilots and buildings from the Great War. Of special interest to aviation researchers.

http://www.flieger-album.de/

First World War Honours & Awards to Canadians in the British Flying Services

This database was prepared by H.A. Halliday and is drawn primarily from a card file now held by the Directorate of History and Heritage, Canadian Forces Headquarters. It includes some awards for services in Russia following the First World War.

http://www.airforce.ca/index2.php3?page=wwi

The Red Fighter Pilot by Manfred Von Richthofen

This on-line edition of Manfred von Richthofen's 1917 book Der Rote Kampfflieger is based on the English language version originally translated by J. Ellis Barker and published in 1918 under the name The Red Battle Flyer.

http://www.richthofen.com/

Canadian Air Aces and Heroes

The small website has some detailed and distilled information on Canadian Air Aces from the Great War to the Korean War. There are also a large number of additional website links to other air war sites.

http://www.constable.ca/

Air Force Association of Canada - Great War Data Base of Pilots

This site contains a very detailed database of pilots who served with the Royal Flying Corps during the Great War. This database has been prepared with generous assistance from Surgeon Commander (ex F/O) John Blatherwick, CM, CD, MD, New Westminster, British Columbia. This database is drawn primarily from a card file now held by the Directorate of History and Heritage, Canadian Forces Headquarters. It includes some awards for services in Russia following the First World War. Certain British personnel are incorporated by virtue of service with the RAF Training Program.

http://www.airforce.ca/index.php3?page=wwi

overthefront.com - The official website of the League of World War I Aviation Historians

The League of World War I Aviation Historians is a non-profit organization whose goals include the accumulation, preservation, and publication of factual data concerning aerial activity of World War I. The website is based on their printed journal and has the start of a discussion forum.

http://www.overthefront.com/main/index.html

Royal Flying Corps - Patrick Wilson's Personal Site May 2005

This site contains a number of personal photographs taken by the late father of Patrick Wilson while an officer with 100 Squadron. In addition, the site contains the scanned "The Annuals of 100 Squadron" and a detailed interview with the last surviving member of the squadron just before he passed away.

http://www.patrickwilson.com/RFC.html

66 Squadron - Royal Flying Corps - John Grech Personal Site June 2005

This website is a detailed, long-term work in progress with a great deal of reference-quality information on the men, biographies and photographs, aircraft makes and serial numbers, medals and memorials of 66 Squadron. Several Canadians served with 66 Squadron including William Barker, VC. Highly recommended as one of the premier Great War websites.

http://www.66squadron.co.uk/

Captain Albert Ball - VC, DSO, MC June 2005

This elegant website contains a detailed summary of Captain Albert Ball of the Royal Flying Corps. There is a detailed listing of aircraft flown, aircraft shot down, flight history, memorabilia, extensive photographs of Captain Ball and recollections from others.

http://www.albertball.homestead.com/

*Jasta Boelcke - German Squadron of the Great War June 2005

This is a very detailed and very high quality website is features and detail beyond what an abstract can outline. The pages of Jasta Boelcke are devoted to Hauptmann (Captain) Oswald Boelcke and his famous Jasta 2. It was Boelcke who realized that the German Air Forces had to get organized in squadrons (Jagdstaffeln) if they wanted to fight effectively against the enemy. Also it was Boelcke who wrote down his tactics and experiences in a document called "The Dicta Boelcke" - a set of guidelines being still followed today by the pilots of modern jetfighter squadrons. On this site you will find historical accurate information about Oswald Boelcke and his Jasta as well as stories about other German Aces and pictures of aircraft on display at various museums. Highly recommended as one of the premier Great War websites.

http://jastaboelcke.de/

Cross & Cockade International June 2005

Cross & Cockade International (CCI) is the First World War Aviation Historical Society with around 1,500 members in 25 countries all over the world. It publishes a quarterly, 72-page journal with an article index back to 1970. There is a detailed research databases on a wide range of items including aircraft and engine serial numbers. There is also a discussion group.

http://www.crossandcockade.com/main.htm

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  • 1 year later...

This section has been expanded since the last posting. Borden Battery

Great War Air Force Websites - Part 13

Note: CEF Study Group member websites denoted with asterisk "*"

==============================================

*Jasta Boelcke - German Squadron of the Great War

This is a very detailed and very high quality website is features and detail beyond what an abstract can outline. The pages of Jasta Boelcke are devoted to Hauptmann (Captain) Oswald Boelcke and his famous Jasta 2. It was Boelcke who realized that the German Air Forces had to get organized in squadrons (Jagdstaffeln) if they wanted to fight effectively against the enemy. Also it was Boelcke who wrote down his tactics and experiences in a document called "The Dicta Boelcke" - a set of guidelines being still followed today by the pilots of modern jet fighter squadrons. On this site you will find historical accurate information about Oswald Boelcke and his Jasta as well as stories about other German Aces and pictures of aircraft on display at various museums. Highly recommended as one of the premier Great War websites. [CEF Study Group - June 2005]

http://jastaboelcke.de/

Cross & Cockade International

Cross & Cockade International (CCI) is the First World War Aviation Historical Society with around 1,500 members in 25 countries all over the world. It publishes a quarterly, 72-page journal with an article index back to 1970. There is a detailed research databases on a wide range of items including aircraft and engine serial numbers. There is also a discussion group. [CEF Study Group - June 2005]

http://www.crossandcockade.com/main.htm

The Aerodrome

This website is very extensive in its documentation of the air war including cross-indexing of aircraft, aces, serial numbers of aircraft and pilot victories. Emphasis is visual and with visual statistics. The discussion forum includes about 3100 members, over 195,000 postings with discussion threads tending to be on specific aircraft and airmen rather than historic discussion. Therefore, an excellent site for researching specific topics on Great War aerial combat.

[Recommendation by Brett Payne / emma gee][CEF Study Group - Jan 2006 - Updated]

http://www.theaerodrome.com/

The Story of World War I Aviation

The history of World War One aviation is a rich and varied story. It was marked by a period of very rapid technological development. This site is quite comprehensive. [CEF Study Group]

http://www.wwiaviation.com/toc.shtml

First World War Honours & Awards to Canadians in the British Flying Services

This database was prepared by H.A. Halliday and is drawn primarily from a card file now held by the Directorate of History and Heritage, Canadian Forces Headquarters. It includes some awards for services in Russia following the First World War. [CEF Study Group]

http://www.airforce.ca/index2.php3?page=wwi

Canadian Air Aces and Heroes

The small website has some detailed and distilled information on Canadian Air Aces from the Great War to the Korean War. There are also a large number of additional website links to other air war sites. [CEF Study Group]

http://www.constable.ca/

Captain Albert Ball - VC, DSO, MC

This elegant website contains a detailed summary of Captain Albert Ball of the Royal Flying Corps. There is a detailed listing of aircraft flown, aircraft shot down, flight history, memorabilia, extensive photographs of Captain Ball and recollections from others. [CEF Study Group - June 2005]

http://www.albertball.homestead.com/

Raymond Collishaw - World War I Fighter Ace

A simple website with a short overview history of a Canadian fighter pilot. Collishaw flew "Black Maria" a Sopwith Triplane from "Black Flight" of 10 Naval RNAS. He remained with the RAF after the Great War, was active in the Second World War with the RAF and finally retired again to Canada. [CEF Study Group - Nov 2005]

http://www.constable.ca/abolishment

William George Barker - World War I Fighter Ace

A simple website summarizing the military life of this oft forgotten Canadian pilot who was one of the most decorated men of the Great War. A recommended book by W. Ralph is "BARKER VC" by Vanwell Publishers. [CEF Study Group - Nov 2005]

http://www.constable.ca/barker.htm

Donald Roderick MacLaren - World War I Fighter Ace

Donald MacLaren, the third most successful Canadian ace of the war after Bishop and Collishaw, had 54 kills - 43 coming in just over four months. He was the master of the Sopwith Camel aircraft. [CEF Study Group - Nov 2005]

http://www.constable.ca/maclaren.html

Alfred Clayburn Atkey - World War I Fighter Ace

Alfred Clayburn Atkey was the highest scoring two-seater pilot of World War I. In May of 1918, Captain Atkey and Lieutenant Gass, as a team shot down 29 enemy aircraft in less than one month. In an epic dogfight known as "Two Against Twenty," Atkey and Gass, together with John Gurdon and his observer, John Thornton, encountered 20 German scouts during the evening of May 7, 1918. In the battle that followed, Atkey and Gass shot down five enemy aircraft. [CEF Study Group - Dec 2005]

http://www.theaerodrome.com/aces/canada/atkey.html

The Flying Career of William Avery Bishop

A short summary of the actions and events associated with William (Billy) Bishop and the awarding of the Victoria Cross. (From the Canadian Air Force Office of Public Affairs, courtesy Capt. Darach McDonnell, Air Command Webmaster, webmaster@www.achq.dnd.ca)[CEF Study Group - June 2006]

http://www.gwpda.org/comment/bishop.html

overthefront.com

The Official website of the League of World War I Aviation Historians

The League of World War I Aviation Historians is a non-profit organization whose goals include the accumulation, preservation, and publication of factual data concerning aerial activity of World War I. The website is based on their printed journal and has the start of a discussion forum. [CEF Study Group]

http://www.overthefront.com/main/index.html

Royal Flying Corps - Patrick Wilson's Personal Site

This site contains a number of personal photographs taken by the late father of Patrick Wilson while an officer with 100 Squadron. In addition, the site contains the scanned "The Annuals of 100 Squadron" and a detailed interview with the last surviving member of the squadron just before he passed away. [CEF Study Group - May 2005]

http://www.patrickwilson.com/RFC.html

66 Squadron - Royal Flying Corps - John Grech Personal Site

This website is a detailed, long-term work in progress with a great deal of reference-quality information on the men, biographies and photographs, aircraft makes and serial numbers, medals and memorials of 66 Squadron. Several Canadians served with 66 Squadron including William Barker, VC. Highly recommended as one of the premier Great War websites. [CEF Study Group - June 2005]

http://www.66squadron.co.uk/

The Red Fighter Pilot by Manfred Von Richthofen

This on-line edition of Manfred von Richthofen's 1917 book Der Rote Kampfflieger is based on the English language version originally translated by J. Ellis Barker and published in 1918 under the name The Red Battle Flyer. [CEF Study Group]

http://www.richthofen.com/

The Nieuport Aircraft Page

This is a well presented visual website on the single-seat French Nieuport scout aircraft. The site is organized into the following elements: Nieuport Identification, Aircraft Profiles, Period Nieuport Drawings, Nieuport Survivors, and a long list of WW1 Nieuport Serial Numbers. [Michael Fletcher Website] [CEF Study Group - July 2006]

http://mars.ark.com/~mdf/nieuport.html

Fokker Dr1.com

This site is dedicated to the documentation of the pictorial history of the 320 Fokker Dr.I single-seat, tri-plane aircraft built during World War I and the fighter pilot Manfred Von Richthofen. The intent of the webmaster is to research and identify all 320 Fokker Dr1 planes built during the Great War and to produce a coloured illustration of each aircraft. [CEF Study Group - June 2006]

http://www.fokkerdr1.com/Mainpage.htm

Flieger Album - German Album of Photographs from Great War

All text in German. However, many excellent photographs of German aircraft, pilots and buildings from the Great War. Of special interest to aviation researchers. [CEF Study Group]

http://www.flieger-album.de/

Air Force Association of Canada - Air Force Honours & Awards

This section of the larger website contains a very extensive listing of honours and awards for Canadians serving with British Flying Services during the Great War as assembled by Mr. Hugh Halliday. Many of the individual member listings include the award citations. Very good site for specific information on specific personnel.

[Note: The link sometimes takes you directly to the site - and sometimes - one must manually follow the titles on the website.][Recommendation by Steven Dieter][CEF Study Group - Nov 2005]

http://www.airforce.ca/index2.php3?page=honours

46 Squadron RAF

This small wiki site contains historical text and photographs of 46 Squadron RAF which first formed in 1916. [CEF Study Group - August 2006]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/No._46_Squadron_RAF

Old Rhinebeck Aerodrome

This website outlines the collection and airshows of the Old Rhinebeck Aerodrome in New York State. The collection includes over sixty aircraft including a large number of Great War aircraft. [CEF Study Group – Jan 2007]

http://www.oldrhinebeck.org/default.htm

The Sopwith Triplane - Great Britain

This section of the Avaition History Online Museum provides and overview of the design, operations, pilots and specifications of this special aircraft.

[CEF Study Group – Jan 2007]

http://www.aviation-history.com/sopwith/triplane.html

Smithsonian, National Air and Space Museum – Great War Exhibit

This small subset of the main website includes images and a short discussion on several Great War aircraft. [CEF Study Group – Jan 2007]

http://www.nasm.si.edu/exhibitions/gal206/gal206.html

Albatros D.Va

The Albatros single-seat fighters produced by Albatros Werke between 1916 and 1918 were among the most numerous of the First World War. This simple website provides a short history of the aircraft and some detailed JPEGS of the restored aircraft and cockpit. [CEF Study Group – Jan 2007][smithsonian, National Air and Space Museum]

http://www.nasm.si.edu/research/aero/aircraft/albatros.htm

Century of Flight – The Great War

This is a well designed and presented website in terms of information and also in some of the animations presented – see the rotary and radial engine sections. The material is presented in a distilled format, often with good diagrams of the topic items. The general reader is able to access a wide range of information from this website. [CEF Study Group – Jan 2007]

http://www.century-of-flight.net/new%20sit...s/WW1_frame.htm

Sopwith Camel

The Sopwith Aviation Company produced the Sopwith F.1 Camel, a famous biplane of World War I is summarized in this simple website. [CEF Study Group – Jan 2007]

http://www.centennialofflight.gov/essay/Di.../Camel/DI78.htm

The Fokker D.VII File

This website provides a good overview of this Great War aircraft which was specifically mentioned in the Versailles Treaty. It includes history, production numbers, specifications, photographs, list of surviving aircraft and bibliographic information. [CEF Study Group – Jan 2007]

http://www.aerofile.info/fokkerd7/d7html/index.html

The Great War Flying Museum – Brampton, Canada

Formed in 1970 this all-volunteer group is dedicated to recreating the sights, sounds and feel of World War One combat aircraft. They build, maintain and fly seven World War One replica fighter aircraft. These include the following: S.E.5a, Fokker DR1, Fokker D.VII, Nieuport 28, and the Sopwith 1½ Strutter.

E-mail: info@GreatWarFlyingMuseum.com [CEF Study Group – Jan 2007]

http://www.greatwarflyingmuseum.com/

Aircraft of the AEF - Nieuport 28C-1

A simple website with some historical background and general specifications on the Nieuport 28C-1 used by the American Expeditionary Force in the Great War. [CEF Study Group – Jan 2007][Great War Society Website]

http://www.worldwar1.com/dbc/npt28c1.htm

Royal Aircraft Factory S.E.5

A simple Wikipedia website on the Royal Aircraft Factory S.E.5 fighter.

[CEF Study Group – Jan 2007][Wikipedia Website]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_Aircraft_Factory_S.E.5

SPAD S.XIII

A simple Wikipedia website on the Société Pour L'Aviation et ses Dérivés SPAD S.XIII fighter.[CEF Study Group – Jan 2007][Wikipedia Website]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SPAD_S.XIII

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www.theaerodrome.com seemed to be becoming more and more dedicated to all things German. ....... it appeared that well over 90% of the entries dealt with the German air force.

Terry, I have no problems with that at all!

And especially not with the fact that over 90% deals with the Luftwaffe :lol:

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over 90% deals with the Luftwaffe :lol:

Egbert

I know I'm a pedant, but I'm pretty sure that the German Army Air Service in the Great War was the Luftstreitkräfte. The Luftwaffe was the post-1933 service.

Cheers

Gareth

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the German Army Air Service in the Great War was the Luftstreitkräfte. The Luftwaffe was the post-1933 service.

Cheers

Gareth

Do you mean the "Imperial German Army Air Service"? Plus the present Luftwaffe= I love them both :lol:

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The Luftstreitkräfte. was formed on 1 October 1912, the Luftwaffe was formed in March 1935.

If any one bombed London or Kent then they certainly bombed in England!

john_g

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The Luftstreitkräfte. was formed on 1 October 1912, the Luftwaffe was formed in March 1935.

If any one bombed London or Kent then they certainly bombed in England!

john_g

well John, at least i did not bomb England as the Brits are my allies today :D

Best Wishes,

egbert,

34th sorry New Year now, 35th year active duty Luftwaffe

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A Forum by its very nature is a gathering of like minded people.

The only way to redressed the balance is for more members with allied intrests to join. I must admit to being an active lurker on the site, so am to blame myself.

Any way the plus site of this thread is the execellent links from Borden Battery.

Happy new year to all

Peter

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The Aerodrome reflects the demographics of its members - most members are American, and most Americans are only interested in the German Air Service, the Lafayette Escadrille, and the US Air Service in that order.

Of course there are exceptions, but my statement can be relied upon as a general rule of thumb. Pick up an issue of Over The Front and you'll see what I mean. When Stew Taylor writes one of his famous biographies of a Canadian airman for OTF, he has to title it as "Schmitt's 13th" or somthing similarly ridiculous to get them to read it :P

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The Aerodrome reflects the demographics of its members - most members are American, and most Americans are only interested in the German Air Service, the Lafayette Escadrille, and the US Air Service in that order.

Of course there are exceptions, but my statement can be relied upon as a general rule of thumb.

I am curious to know if your statements are based on data or other evidence? I love the Aerodrome, count me as one of the exceptions...

Observing

Fee 2b

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I am curious to know if your statements are based on data or other evidence?
Well there's the member map for starters, which shows members by location. I couldn't be bothered to count, but the vast majority of whom are in the states.

And one, as suggested, only has to wing (NPI) through the People and Aircraft and Models forums (fora? forii?) to see that 90% of the threads do concern the GAS.

Best wishes,

Grovetown.

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Some time ago I commented on the fact that the well known website www.theaerodrome.com seemed to be becoming more and more dedicated to all things German. Today I scrolled through the People section of the forum and it appeared that well over 90% of the entries dealt with the German air force.Now I am full of respect for the efforts of the men who flew for the Kaiser, but it would be nice to see a bit more balanced coverage of the Allied side. Then again, I am one of those who stopped contributing to the site so perhaps I have myself to blame!

Terry,

There are few forums to discuss the German forces in English. All you can do is contribute and keep the discussion of Allied forces going there...a bit like the people with German interests do here... ;)

Paul

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Terry,

All you can do is contribute and keep the discussion of Allied forces going there...a bit like the people with German interests do here... ;)

Paul

Excellent point Paul ;)

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Thanks for your comments, guys. I tended to just get a bit fed up with the attitudes displayed by some members who tended to take everything German as the gospel while discounting anything the Brits did. I even pointed out that the American scoring system was just as flawed as the RFC/RAF one was, but it seemed to fall on deaf ears, although one chap was good enough to point out the Eddie R. probably only had about a dozen victories, not 26.

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Terry, I just registered there. Please correct your head of thread to 91%

I'm already a member. I'm the one who asked about German Air Forces at Verdun a few weeks back :)

Paul

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