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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

K Shells.


Tony Lund
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Can someone please tell me what are K Shells? I have seen them mentioned with Lachrymatory Shells, which are Tear Gas.

Also P Bombs, am I right to assume they would be phosphorus grenades?

Thanks,

Tony

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'K' possibly refers to SK, which was the code name for Ethyl Idoacetate. It was used as a tear gas. KSK was the more effective precursor that saw some use. Another 'K' was KJ, the code name for Stannic Chloride. This could pass through a respiratory and cause sneezing.

Robert

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The "P" Bomb was a smoke grenade and was also designated as the No.26 Grenade, known as " Cylindrical type C or P Bomb". It was a 5" long 3" diameter tin filled with red phosphorous, ignited by a Brock lighter with a 9 second fuze, it was intended for use with the West Spring gun. Weight filled about 1lb 8oz. The tin was painted black with a red diamond making on the top.

Mike

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Much depends on the context of the original document. Germany used lachrimatory shells filled with Dichloromethylchloroformate which was given the code letter K when used in artillery rounds. It was more commonly known as K Stoff. Production of these rounds began in January 1915 and were manufactured by Bayer of Leverkusen.

Terry Reeves

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It’s referring to a period of German shellfire, “beginning with lachrymatory and going on to K Shell.” Clearly the writer is making a distinction between the two, but he is an artilleryman, so he may distinguish between the different kinds of shell in a way that non specialists would not.

Tony.

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I think for practical purposes I can consider K Shell can be some form of Tear gas or similar type of shell.

And there can be no doubt about the P Bombs.

Thank you,

Tony.

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Much depends on the context of the original document. Germany used lachrimatory shells filled with Dichloromethylchloroformate which was given the code letter K when used in artillery rounds. It was more commonly known as K Stoff. Production of these rounds began in January 1915 and were manufactured by Bayer of Leverkusen.

Terry Reeves

Terry, at least in William Moore's book "Gas Attack", which appears to be well-researched and documented, he refers to Trichlometheyl-chloroformate as "K2 Stoff". Of interest is that he lists it as a lethal agent, not a lachrimator. This would seem to fit more with the description in the original question, of lacrimators being followed by something else (K shells)-- a lethal shell following a barrage of lacrimators was a common tactic of all the armies, so this really makes more sense than K being a referral to another type of lacrimator. This shell, either filled with C Stoff or K2 Stoff, was apparently called White C by the Germans. Doc2

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