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Remembered Today:

Article found in 1917 paper


jemm
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I just came across this article tonight in what was the local paper for my village back in 1917.

post-4696-1126302019.jpg

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Ah. But was there any truth to any of it?

Unnamed reader from a small Lancastrian village who can, presumably, read Danish. And who has, somehow, acquired the Danish newspaper, in France. And, even if this is true, where is the evidence that the newspaper had not invented the story which, conveniently, can be interpreted to fit the facts. But so can Nostradamus.

Remember the Angel of Mons, the crucified Canadian, etc.

John the Cynic

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"The war shall last three years and five months"?

Although influenza (disease) did follow the war............

Alan

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And wrong!!

Alan

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Which prophet was that then??

:lol:

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On the subject of prophecies, anyone heard this one?

When the EEF advanced through Sinai to Plaestine they built a railway and a water pipeline alongside it right from Egypt to Gaza.

According to my book on the Northants Battery RFA written 1923 this "fulfilled an old Arab prophecy that Turkish rule would only cease when Nile water flowed into Palestine."

I believe the Arabs also looked kindly on the entry of Allenby in Jerusalem because his name was mistaken for "Allah's Prophet" (not sure on that last bit)

Steve.

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Most of this prophecy stuff is dross, don't know about the Brahan Seer (sp? )though, who seems pretty accurate.

When something happens it is not difficult to find something that can be said to have predicted what later happened.

A younger member of this household has installed an XBox screen saver on this computer. If I had been reading it in New Orleans a couple of weeks ago I could say that they had it about right.

I can't remember the whole thing, but it includes: "The Signs Are Everywhere", "A Breach Is Imminent" and "Where Will You Hide When It Comes?"

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Posted this 'Paper prophecy' some time ago. Bet you'll find this kind of thing right across the world. It seems to be the same one.

Anyone come across this before? This appeared in an American Newspaper of November 1917. Was it a stunt of some kind? or were there many of these 'dire prophecies' going around at the time in different countries?

Neillsville, Wisconsin Times:-

The following prophecy was taken from an old manuscript of the year 1701 which was found after breaking down the wall of an old monastery dedicated to the Holy.

It was writen by a fugitive monk and because of its prophetic content was framed and hung up in the council chanbers of the Wismar.

"O Lord have mercy with they peoples who are turning away from Thee more and more; they destroy thy cloisters and annihilate thy sacred socities; they apprporiate power to themselves and make this subject to their own purposes.

"In time when the Holy See is vacant, Europe will be visited with terrible calamities. Malice, hatred and baseness will excite a few, the assasination of a prince will start a widespread conflagration.

"Seven Empires will arise against one bird with one head and another with two heads. The birds will protect themselves with wings and with talons will they defend themselves.

"A price from the midst will mount a horse from the reverse side and will be surrounded by a wall of enemies. The monarch's motto will be 'With God Forward'.

"THE VEHICLES will rush along without horses and fiery dragons will fly through the air and throw fire and sulphur on cities and towns and destroy them.

"Three years and five months the riot will continue; time will come when you can neither buy nor sell, the bread will be marked and divided. The seas will be red with blood and men will dwell on the bottom of the sea and watch for their prey. The war will commence when the ears of the grain will bend down with ripe fruit and will climax when the cherries ripens for the third time and peace will be established at Christmas time."

The prediction written 216 years ago has so far been fuulfilled in a large degree.

Edited by Desmond7
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The prediction written 216 years ago has so far been fuulfilled in a large degree.

Des

The problem with these type of predictions is that they are more often than not fulfilled to a lesser or greater extent but never fully. They are suitably vague as to be able to be applied to all manner of situations. If the seers can see why do they never mention specifics i.e. names, dates etc.

Andy

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Would anyone care to make a prediction, here and now, of a coming event, something which is totally unexpected? Something they`ve dreamt, perhaps, or divined from sources unknown? Something that even John the Cynic (& I) will be amazed by? :) Phil B

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The problem with these type of predictions is that they are more often than not fulfilled to a lesser or greater extent but never fully.

Nor do you hear about the predications that might be made and are not fulfilled.

Like mine - that Manchester City would win the Premiership every year between 1997 and 2003. Does anyone ever mention that? No, they don't. Not even me. :lol:

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Max - just to make it clear ... the bit about the prediction coming true is from the actual article. It ain't me.

Des From Roswell :D

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Ah. But was there any truth to any of it?

John the Cynic

Would that have really mattered to those back in 1917? I often read through these old newspapers the vast majority of them feature adverts for miraculous cures for ailments we still see today and some we don't. With the knowledge we have today of medicines and human anatomy these adverts are quite laughable, but to the people in 1917 they were genuine claims, after all how were they to know otherwise?. To a parent, brother or sister of a soldier fighting overseas in 1917 this prophecy might have brought a little comfort by it's saying the war will be over by christmas :)

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Nuthin changes ... at least seven or eight times a year a similar story about everything from 9/11 to the Tsunami/Katrina type events appear.

It's human nature.

Agreed .. think it was the journos of the time flogging up a story to soothe those very hearts you talk about.

Des

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To a parent, brother or sister of a soldier fighting overseas in 1917 this prophecy might have brought a little comfort  by it's saying the war will be over by christmas :)

Having heard much the same tosh before Xmas 1914, I expect they had a jolly good laugh at it, then.

John

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think it was the journos of the time flogging up a story to soothe those very hearts you talk about.

Cos journos are reknowned for that sort of kindliness - then & now.

You been at the Bushmills again. Or just having a laff.

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Nah - TV's mediocre (or words to that effect).

Are you saying Journos are hartless, Hartley? You sinical git ncst fing ull be saying we cant sepll!

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However, I wonder if this paper exists in Wismar town hall.

Was the story completly a fake or words 'well' translated ?

Any idea?

I notice that Wismar is in Germany

(if this is realy the one given in the article).

So no chance for the Fren/english/USA to chek this easily.

Kin regards

Some about Wismar

http://www.schwalbennest-wismar.de/rathaus.jpg

Wismar

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Wismar Coat of ArmsWismar is a smaller port and Hanseatic League town in northern Germany on the Baltic Sea, in the state of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, about 45 km due east of Lübeck, and 30 km due north of Schwerin. Its natural harbor, located in the Bay of Wismar is well-protected by a promontory. The population was 48,800 in 1997, more than doubled from 21,902 in 1905.

The church of St Mary, a Brick Gothic edifice of the 13th and 14th centuries (badly damaged in World War II and deliberately destroyed in 1960 under the East German government, leaving only the 260 ft. steeple), and the church of St Nicholas (1381-1460), with very lofty vaulting, are regarded as good examples of the influence exercised in these northern provinces by the large church of St Mary in Lübeck. The elegant cruciform church of St George dates from the 14th and 15th centuries. The Fürstenhof, at one time a ducal residence, and later occupied by the municipal authorities, is a richly decorated specimen of the Italian early Renaissance style. Built in 1552-1565, it was restored in 1877-1879. The "Old School," dating from about 1300, has been restored, and used as a museum. The town hall, rebuilt in 1829, contains a collection of pictures.

Wismar is said to have received civic rights in 1229, and came into the possession of Mecklenburg in 1301. In 1259 it had entered a pact with Lübeck and Rostock, intended to defend against the numerous Baltic sea pirates, which developed into the Hanseatic League. During the 13th and 14th centuries it was a flourishing Hanseatic town, with important woollen factories. Though a plague carried off 10,000 of the inhabitants in 1376, the town seems to have remained tolerably prosperous until the 16th century.

[edit]

Under Swedish Rule

By the Peace of Westphalia in 1648 Wismar passed to Sweden, with a lordship to which it gives its name. Through Wismar and the other dominions in the Holy Roman Empire, the Swedish monarchs in their roles as princes, or Reichsfürsten, took part in the Imperial Diets. From 1653 it was the seat of the highest court for that part of Sweden. In 1803 Sweden pledged both town and lordship to Mecklenburg for 1,258,000 Riksdaler, reserving, however, the right of redemption after 100 years. In view of this contingent right of Sweden, Wismar was not represented in the diet of Mecklenburg until 1897. In 1903 Sweden finally renounced its claims. Wismar still retains a few relics of its old liberties, including the right to fly its own flag.

At the turn of the 19th century the most important manufactures of Wismar were in iron, machinery, paper, roofing-felt and asphalt. There was also a considerable trade, especially by sea, with exports including grain, oil-seeds and butter, and the imports coal, timber and iron. The harbour was deep enough to admit vessels of 17-ft. draught, and permitting large steamers to unload along its quays.

Representative of Hanseatic League city brick construction as well as the Eastern German brick churches it received a place on the UNESCO list of World Heritage Sites.

This article incorporates text from the 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica, which is in the public domain.

[edit]

External links

The lovely town at the Baltic sea

Short architectural history of St. Mary's church (in German)

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wismar"

Categories: 1911 Britannica | Dominions of Sweden | Towns in Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania

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