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Retford Memorial and KOSB


dorrie
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Both Cambell Caward and John Marsh were members of the Kings Own Scttish Borderers (2nd Battalion) and shared consecutive regimental nos.. Both men were killed on 14th October 1914. Could anybody shed any light on what the 2nd Battalion KOSB were doing at the time?

Thanks

Dorrie

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Dorrie,

Judging by where they are both buried, I'd look at this link first.

http://www.1914-1918.net/bat6.htm

Although according to the CWGC site and SDGW, Caward is recorded as dieing on the 13th:

Name: CAWARD, CAMPBELL

Initials: C

Nationality: United Kingdom

Rank: Private

Regiment: King's Own Scottish Borderers

Unit Text: 2nd Bn.

Date of Death: 13/10/1914

Service No: 7634

Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead

Grave/Memorial Reference: Panel 15.

Cemetery: LE TOURET MEMORIAL

Born: Retford, Notts

Enlisted: Retford, Notts

Residence: Retford, Notts

Name: MARSH, JOHN MICHAEL

Initials: J M

Nationality: United Kingdom

Rank: Private

Regiment: King's Own Scottish Borderers

Unit Text: 2nd Bn.

Age: 33

Date of Death: 14/10/1914

Service No: 7633

Additional information: Son of Edward and Anne Marsh, of Back Pad, Moorgate, Retford, Notts.

Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead

Grave/Memorial Reference: Panel 15.

Cemetery: LE TOURET MEMORIAL

Born: Darwent, Lancs

Enlisted: Retford, Notts

Residence: Retford, Notts

Both were killed in action.

Steve

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According to Ray Westlake's 'British Battalions in France & Belgium 1914':

12th - took part in attack on Cuinchy

13th - engaged around Annequin

14th - no mention (typical!)

15th - relieved and to Beuvry

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From pages 48/49 of "The K.O.S.B. in the Great War" by Capt. Stair Gillon:

"On the 12th the bad news came that the French had lost Vermelles, 2 miles S. of Annequin. The language problem had already started, when the K.O.S.B. were relieved by by the arrival of other battalions of the 13th I.B., and were ordered forthwith, i.e. at 4pm, to attack Cuinchy between the road (S.) and the canal (N.) towards La Bassee. Beyond the canal were the Dorsets [1st Bn.] slightly in advance of the K.O.S.B.; on their R. were the D. of W. [2nd Duke of Wellington's (West Riding)]. The attack did not last long. 'D' on the L. met with heavy fire which killed Major Allan (from whom Captain Caird took over) and 2nd Lieut. Woollcombe, a true son of the regiment. Dalrymple was wounded, and there were 10 other casualties. 'A' were also opposed strongly, but the C.O. was able to reinforce before 5pm and, before 6pm, to intimate consolidation on the ground then won.....Next day it was hoped with the aid of a field-gun to press forward, and a start ordered for 5.30, as part of a larger operation in which the 3rd Division were taking part. The K.O.S.B. still pointed towards Cuinchy and the D. of W. faced Auchy. It was for a brilliant bit of patrol leading that Sergt. J. Skinner won his first honour in the Great War - the D.C.M.. A/C.S.M. H. Pike was similarly honoured.

On the 13th, once more the Dorsets N. of the canal were ahead, and by 10am had ahlted E. of Givenchy and offered help by oblique fire. But an advance of a furlong was the utmost the K.O.S.B. could achieve, and it was reported that the D. of W. were similarly consolidating.So there they also consolidated. As is well known, the Dorsets came in for a terrible shelling, 13 officers were killed and more than half the battalion were killed, wounded, or missing. They were withdrawn to Pont Fixe. Our battalion had 60 casualties (k. and w.), besides losing 2nd Lieut. MacRae, who died on the 14th, and Capt. Smith, who could ill be spared, and Caird, both wounded. The 13th was therefore another sombre day for the Borderers. On the 14th Coke [Major - C.O.] was in suspense all day. No messenger could pass from Connell [Capt. - O.C. firing line], and it was only realized, after relief by the 256th Inf. Regt. of the French, that the K.O.S.B. had smothered what might have developed into an attack en masse, by steadiness and good musketry. 2nd Lieut. H.J. Harvey was wounded. The French took over speedily and silently about 2am on the 15th, and the K.O.S.B. marched back in the small hours 2 miles to Beuvry utterly exhausted."

Doesn't give very much on the 14th, but I hope it adds some detail to the events of the time.

Stuart

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  • 12 years later...

Hello Dorrie. Are you related to Campbell Caward?

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