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Remembered Today:

Territorial during WW1


dycer

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Although I'm asking a question I already seem to have the answer but I'm still puzzled!

I found a "testimonial" wriiten in 1919 to support my Father's application to join the Police Force.

He served with the 5th (Volunteer Battalion) Royal Scots from 1917(when he was 16) and the reference is dated April 1919(when he would have been 18).The reference says he was a regular attender at Drill Nights,etc and a suitable candidate to join the Police.

My question.As the Territorials continued to recruit during the War was it mainly to recruit young boys,along the lines of the Army Cadet Force,to prepare them for future service?

George

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George,

the Volunteer Training Corps existed as voluntary organisation from early in WW1 and provided some basic pre-service training.

In 1916 it changed name to the Volunteer Force (under the terms of the old 1863 Volunteer Act) and assumed a more military character, but still voluntary, still part-time and with the weaknesses of the old Volunteer system e.g. men could leave by giving 14 days notice. A further act in Dec 16 meant those enlisting were committed to serve in the VF until the end of the war and allowed men in reserved occupations to be conscripted into the VF. Men under the age for conscription served in the VF.

The VF was used for static guarding and a host of ancillary tasks.

VF infantry units were ultimately tied to regular regiments and designated as X (Volunteer Battalion), The Loamshires or whatever (there are some variations on this).

I think you may be confusing 5th (VB) Royal Scots with 5th Royal Scots TF. Direct recuiting to the TF ended after the introduction of conscription - everybody was conscripted for general service.

Jock

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Jock,

Thanks for the clarification.

Yes I was confusing the 5th(TF) with the 5th(VB) Royal Scots.I must admit I was mixed up as he lived in Haddington and would have thought he would have gone for the 8th Royal Scots if he had had the choice.

All I need to find out now is which Battalion he was serving in when he trained as a Big-Drummer.

Do you know if the VB's stretched to Pipe Bands?One of my Father's favourite stories was losing a drum-stick marching down Princes Street.He never did say if it hit a bystander,though. :D

George

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George,

nice story!!

I'm sure the VB's would have aspired to pipe bands.

Jock

Jock,

    Thanks for the clarification.

    Yes I was confusing the 5th(TF) with the 5th(VB) Royal Scots.I must admit I was mixed up as he lived in Haddington and would have thought he would have gone for the 8th Royal Scots if he had had the choice.

    All I need to find out now is which Battalion he was serving in when he trained as a Big-Drummer.

    Do you know if the VB's stretched to Pipe Bands?One of my Father's favourite stories was losing a drum-stick marching down Princes Street.He never did say if it hit a bystander,though.  :D

George

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