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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

VC winners


bernardmcilwaine

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my two are daniel laidlaw,the piper of loos,closely followed by wilfred wood,the only reason why wilfred is in 2nd place is because he took unfair advantage of 300+germans,hes a stockport lad,what chance did they have against him,tough little b*****s up there in stocky,bernard

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Overall it would most likely be Wing Commander Hughie Edwards as he grew up in the same area I live, but for WW1 it would be Clifford Sadlier of the 51st Battalion AIF who won his VC at Villers Brettoneux on April 25th 1918 during the counter attack to retake that village from the Germans.

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Don't know about favourites but General Sir Adrian Carton de Wiart always stands out in my mind and I was lucky enough to pick up a great photo of him post war, resplendent in eye patch and medal ribbons.

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Don't know about favourites but General Sir Adrian Carton de Wiart always stands out in my mind and I was lucky enough to pick up a great photo of him post war, resplendent in eye patch and medal ribbons.

paul,carton de wiart,wasnt a VCwinner,he was a VC,cos he must have been made out of the same stuff the amount of times he was wounded AND he wasnt even british,i think he could be a good candidate.bernard

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My favourite is Lt Annand met him twice & have held his medals a real officer & a gent sadly no longer with us.

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My favourites: the ace Billy Barker, who excelled at every aspect of the war in the war, not just shooting down enemy aircraft; Milton F. Gregg, who I met before his death; and Herman Good, a Canadian backwoodsman who captured a German artillery unit.

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hiya terry,not much chance of herman taking one of his trophys home :lol: bit different from an helmet or a bayonet and to big for the sideboard,william had the heart of a lion and a chest to match,but not big enough for all the medals he won,wasnt he from dauphin manitoba

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Yes, Barker was a Manitoba boy, and in contrast to Bishop and a few others, I have never heard anything negative sais about Barker. He was the real thing.

Good was one of those fellows who seem to come along in every war. A natural woodsman and hunter, he survived the war, and here in my province the Legion branch in his home town is named in his honour.

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My favourites Wilfrith Elstob and George Onions.

You might be interested in the photo of the headstone of the Piper of Loos, Norham, Northumberland.

post-1048-1117541086.jpg

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My favourites Wilfrith Elstob and George Onions.

You might be interested in the photo of the headstone of the Piper of Loos, Norham, Northumberland.

matt how did you get that picture,daniel laidlaws last request was to be buried in an unmarked grave,bernard

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Don't know about favourites but General Sir Adrian Carton de Wiart always stands out in my mind and I was lucky enough to pick up a great photo of him post war, resplendent in eye patch and medal ribbons.

I too have great admiration for Carton de Wiart

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carton de wiart and the salamander were born for war,in peace, peaceful,in war,a handful,great men,bernard

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Don't know about favourites but General Sir Adrian Carton de Wiart always stands out in my mind and I was lucky enough to pick up a great photo of him post war, resplendent in eye patch and medal ribbons.

paul i think i have one of him before he lost his eye and hand,bernard

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My favorite just has to be Charles Upham.

Not World War One I know, but being a New Zealander, I just couldnt resist and boast one of our boys got VC...and bar. One of the very few soldiers I believe to recieve the VC twice.

Beat that the Brits...Ha ha.

:lol:

CHeeky I know !! :P

Cheers Aaron.

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we doubled that :D charles upham was still running his own ranch,out every day,rain or shine right up till the end,bernard

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Beat that the Brits...Ha ha.

How about Captain Noel Godfrey Chavasse VC and Bar, MC, RAMC, Medical Officer 10th Bn Kings Regiment.

Beats yours by an MC and WWI

Fred

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nice call fred, ;) and chuck in capt arthur martin leake.england 2 new zealand 1

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My Favs are.. Bishop, Good, and Tilston...I was Tilstons Driver when the Queen came to Canada and I got to touch his V.C. ..He saw me looking at it out of the corner of my eye and made the offer..he also had a great sense of humour and although he was with 3 Other Cols. he never left me out in the cold ( I was a master Cpl back then) he even invited me into the house of the local Col and insisted that I sit with them for drinks.

Dean Owen

Whitby Ontario Canada

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hiya dean,didnt tilston lose his legs during the war or was he decorated at the palace with a VC winner who had,bernard, ps a memorable moment dean,smashing,thanks bernard

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For me it has to be Sergeant James Youll Turnbull of the 17th H.L.I.- he played a large part in his battalion taking and holding part of the Leipzig Salient trenches, near Authuille( The Granatloch ).

He and his men held out against German counter- attacks for upwards of 14 hours. He was able to out throw the German bombers due to his well developed physique, and used an abandoned store of German bombs when he and his mens' store of mills bombs were running low.Attempts by the 11th Borders, the 1st Dorsets and the 19th Lancashire Fusilers had floundered on the murderous fire the Germans had set up on approaches to the Granatloch. Turnbull met his death at the hands of a sniper, when he was bombing forward in opposition to a German attack during the evening of July 1st 1916. His citation is a testimony to the courage of him and his battalion -

"Although his party was wiped out and replaced several times during the day, Sgt Turnbull never wavered in his determination to hold the post, the loss of which would have been very serious. Almost single handed he maintained his position and diplayed the highest degree of valour and skill in the performance of his duties."

He is buried in The Lonsdale Cemetery, Authuille, alongside men of many of the regiments named above, about 100/200 yards from the scene of his sacrifice.

post-1137-1117640186.jpg

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thanks spike,they were all great men but daniel laidlaw was one of those i remember from a kid and he stuck in my head ever since,bernard,those pics you posted for me got some attention,thanks

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Bernard,

Well as they say, you don't get a VC for nowt, so lets remember them all with pride

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Guess we will all have our "favourites" from these brave men many of whom felt they were only doing their duty and were extremely modest about it. My favourite for obviuos reasons below is Captain Thomas Riversdale Colyer-Fergusson,aged 21 only VC of the 2nd battalion Northants. Awarded for tackling MG posts on the Bellewarde area July 1917 sadly killed by a sniper shortly afterwards. Pic below. he is buried in Memin Rd South Cemetery Ypres. Pic of grave to follow.

post-4532-1117659171.jpg

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