Jump to content
Free downloads from TNA ×
The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Twelve Rededication Services: 2-9 July 2024


MelPack

Recommended Posts

The details of the Rededication Services are below. I am sure that regular posters to the forum should take credit for at least some of these.

2 July

  • 10am – A rededication service for L/Cpl Arthur Dowding of 1st Bn Monmouthshire Regiment who died on 3 October 1918. This service will take place at Bellicourt British Cemetery, France.

  • 3pm – A rededication service for 2/Lt Noel Osborne-Jones, 2/Lt Herbert Taggart and Pte Lionel Grove of the Royal Welsh Fusiliers, who all died on 8 May 1916. This service will take place at Cabaret Rouge British Cemetery, France

3 July

  • 10.30am – A rededication service for Capt. Clifford Nichols of 5th Bn Royal Welsh Fusiliers (attached to the 164 Coy Machine Gun Corps) who died on 31 July 1917. This service will take place at Bedford House Cemetery, Belgium.

  • 3pm – A rededication service for Pte George Montague Price of 5th Bn South Wales Borderers who died on 2 October 1917. This service will take place at Chester Farm Cemetery, Belgium.

9 July

  • 10.30am – A rededication service for CQMS John Doherty MM of 1st Battalion The Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, who was killed in action on 22 March 1918. This service will be take place at Savy British Cemetery, France.

10 July

  • 10.15am – A rededication service for Serjeant Laurence Connell MM of 1st Battalion The Royal Dublin Fusiliers, who was killed in action on 5 October 1918. This service will take place at Dadizeele New British Cemetery, Belgium.

  • 11.15am – A rededication service for Second Lieutenant Joseph Bryson MC att. 9th Battalion The Royal Irish Fusiliers, who was killed in action on 6 October 1918, and Second Lieutenant William Cunningham att. 1st Battalion The Royal Irish Fusiliers, who was killed in action on 1 October 1918. This service will take place at Dadizeele New British Cemetery, Belgium.

  • 3pm – A rededication service for Private William McCann of 1st Battalion The Royal Dublin Fusiliers, who was killed in action on 21 October 1918. This service will take place at Stasegem Communal Cemetery, Belgium.

11 July

  • 10.30am – A rededication service for Corporal Edward Doyle, Private Bertie George Reynolds MM, Lance Corporal James Edward Freer and Lance Corporal George Washington of 1st Battalion The Royal Dublin Fusiliers, who were killed in action on 28 and 29 September 1918. This service will take place at Hooge Crater Cemetery, Belgium.

  • 2.30pm – A rededication service for Captain Valentine Knox Gilliland of 2nd Battalion The Royal Irish Rifles, who was killed in action on 7/8 May 1918. This service will take place at Divisional Collecting Post Cemetery and Extension, Belgium.

Edited by MelPack
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • MelPack changed the title to Twelve Rededication Services: 2-9 July 2024
  • 3 weeks later...
News story

Graves of six soldiers of Welsh regiments identified on the Western Front

The graves of six soldiers from Welsh regiments, who went missing in France and Belgium during World War One, have now been marked more than a century after their deaths.

From:
Ministry of Defence and Veterans UK
Published
4 July 2024
s300_Padre_Richard_Mutter_leads_the_serv

Padre Richard Mutter leads the service at Cabaret Rouge British Cemetery (Crown Copyright)

Though all six soldiers had been buried at the times of their deaths, their names had been lost. Their graves were only identified recently after researchers submitted cases to the Commonwealth War Graves Commission’s (CWGC). 

Further research by the MOD’s Joint Casualty and Compassionate Centre (JCCC), also known as the ‘MOD War Detectives’, the CWGC, and the National Army Museum, used sources such as war diaries, service records, grave registration reports and other documents. Following this, the original findings were confirmed allowing each soldier to be commemorated by name. 

The grave rededication services were organised by JCCC, and saw named headstones provided for Second Lieutenant (2/Lt) Noel Osbourne Jones; 2/Lt Herbert Taggart; Private (Pte) Lionel Grove and Captain (Capt) Clifford Nichols, all of the Royal Welsh Fusiliers, as well as Lance Corporal (L/Cpl) Arthur Dowding of the Monmouthshire Regiment and Pte George Price of the South Wales Borderers. The services were attended by serving soldiers and representatives of The Royal Welsh. 

The services were held in France on 2 July at CWGC’s Bellicourt British Cemetery and Cabaret Rouge British Cemetery, as well as in Belgium, on 3 July, at Bedford House Cemetery and Chester Farm Cemetery. The family of Captain Nichols attended. 

JCCC Caseworker, Alexia Clark, said: 

Researching these six men and getting to know their individual war stories has been a fascinating journey. It has been a privilege to have played a part in the conclusion of those stories and to know that their families finally have answers to what happened to them. 

2/Lt Noel Osborne-Jones, 2/Lt Herbert Taggart, and Pte Lionel Grove were all killed on 8 May 1916 while conducting a trench raid. Their bodies were recovered by the Germans and buried by them at Fournes, before being moved to the Cabaret Rouge Cemetery after the war. Unfortunately, the Germans did not know their names, and as such they identified their bodies only by rank and regiment. Following the war, all three men were named on the Memorial to the Missing at Loos. 

L/Cpl Dowding was killed in action near Ramicourt in October 1918, just weeks before the end of the war. Although he was buried at the time of his death, key information about his grave was lost in the chaos of conflict, and after the war he was named on the Vis-en-Artois Memorial. 

The_military_party_stand_behind_the_head

The military party stands behind the headstone of L/Cpl Dowding (Crown Copyright)

Captain Nichols was killed during the Battle of Passchendaele on 31 July 1917. At the time of his death, he was listed as a member of the Royal Welsh Fusiliers who had been attached to 164 Machine Gun Company. His body was recovered from an unmarked field grave near Spree Farm in 1923, and his rank and regiment were identified by his buttons and badges. Unfortunately, there was nothing to indicate his name at the time, and he was buried as an unknown officer. Following the war, Capt. Nichols was commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial to the Missing in Ypres. 

The_family_of_Captain_Nichols_stand_with

The family of Captain Nichols stands with the military party at the graveside (Crown Copyright)

Private Price was killed in action near Hill 60, Belgium in October 1917. He was originally buried in a field grave, but by the end of the war all recordings of his name had been lost. He was commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial to the Missing.  

Wreaths_and_flowers_laid_at_the_grave_of

Wreaths and flowers laid at the grave of Pte Price (Crown Copyright)

The services were conducted by The Reverend Richard Mutter CF, Chaplain to 1st Battalion The Royal Welsh. 

The Reverend Richard Mutter CF said: 

To restore the names to these young men and to honour their sacrifice here in this place is a very special thing. I am pleased to have led these services of rededication and to help close the final chapter of these men’s stories.

The headstones over the graves were replaced by CWGC. Xavier Puppinck, France Area Director at CWGC, said: 

It is an honour for the CWGC to care for the graves of these six valiant soldiers of the Royal Welsh Fusiliers, the Monmouthshire Regiment and the South Wales Borderers who went missing in France and Belgium during World War One. They paid the ultimate price while fighting on the Western Front, more than 100 years ago. And now, it is our privilege and duty to care for their graves in perpetuity.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

News and photos much appreciated Mel,

Clive

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Further repoet on 9 July Rededication:

News story

Grave of Donegal soldier identified in France more than 100 years after his death

The grave of Company Quartermaster Serjeant (CQMS) John Doherty MM (Military Medal), who went missing in France on 22 March 1918, has been identified.

From:
Ministry of Defence and Veterans UK
Published
9 July 2024
 
s300_IMG_20240709_103110828_HDR.jpg

The Rev Jason Clarke MBE CF, Chaplain to 1st Battalion The Royal Irish Regiment, conducts the rededication service for CQMS Doherty (Crown Copyright)

A rededication service was held today, 9 July 2024, at the graveside of CQMS John Doherty MM in Commonwealth War Graves Commission’s (CWGC) Savy British Cemetery, near Saint Quentin, France. 

The location was discovered after the soldier’s great-great-nephew submitted evidence to CWGC hoping to identify his final resting place. Further research by CWGC, the National Army Museum and Joint Casualty and Compassionate Centre (JCCC) confirmed his findings. 

The service was attended by members of the extended Doherty family, who travelled from the UK and Ireland to pay their respects. It was organised by the MOD’s JCCC, also known as the ‘MOD War Detectives’, and was attended by serving soldiers of The Royal Irish Regiment. 

IMG_20240709_104700207_HDR.jpg

The service is attended by serving members of 1st Battalion The Royal Irish Regiment and members of the extended Doherty family (Crown Copyright)

Chris Doherty, great nephew of CQMS Doherty said: 

My grandfather William survived the war. His brothers John, Daniel and James all gave their lives so we could live ours free, but William ensured that their names would never be forgotten. On behalf of the Doherty family, we wish to thank and acknowledge the hard work and dedication of Rosie Barron, the JCCC War Detectives and their colleagues at the CWGC, who have given myself and my family the privilege of being present today at the rededication of the final resting place of our Grand Uncle, in this beautiful setting and in the company of his comrades, some of whom he will have lived, fought and died with. 

IMG_20240709_104724138_HDR.jpg

Chris Doherty lays flowers at his great uncle's grave in Savy British Cemetery (Crown Copyright)

On the morning of 21 March 1918, the German Army launched Operation Michael, the first phase of its spring offensive, with the aim of defeating allies in the west before the arrival of American troops. When the attack commenced, 1st Battalion The Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers were located at Le Hamel, southwest of Saint Quentin. They were ordered up to the battle area and remained in their positions under intense shellfire. 

On 22 March 1918, the company was attacked and forced back with heavy casualties. Around 40 men - all that remained of the battalion - continued fighting the German Army. By the end of the day more than 500 men were missing. CQMS Doherty, aged 36, was among them. He was commemorated on the Pozieres Memorial. 

JCCC Caseworker, Rosie Barron, said: 

It has been a privilege to work with The Royal Irish Regiment to organise the rededication service for CQMS Doherty. His family suffered heavily following World War One, with 3 sons missing after serving with The Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers. For their widowed mother, this loss must have been profound. It has therefore been fitting to have so many of their family in attendance today to celebrate the life of CQMS Doherty and his brothers, and honour their sacrifice.

The service was conducted by the Reverend Jason Clarke MBE CF, Chaplain to 1st Battalion The Royal Irish Regiment. He said: 

Today we rededicate this grave, and acknowledge by name CQMS John Doherty. In so doing, we honour his memory and give thanks for his example of courage to the end. In the horror of such terrible fighting, he was faithful and true, fighting alongside his men and giving his life in the defence of others.

The headstone over the grave was replaced by CWGC.  

Xavier Puppinck, France Area Director Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC), said:  

It is a privilege to care for the grave of CQMS John Doherty MM. The Commonwealth War Graves Commission is dedicated to ensuring that this serviceman, who made the ultimate sacrifice, is remembered with the dignity and respect he deserves. We are committed to ensuring his memory lives on in perpetuity, providing a place of reverence and respect for generations to come.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Good to know that ID results are still happening.  Thanks Mel.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Another JCCC Report:

News story

Graves of two World War 1 officers of The Royal Irish Fusiliers identified

The graves of Second Lieutenant (2ndLt) Joseph Bryson MC and 2ndLt William Cunningham have been identified side by side in a cemetery in Belgium more than a century after their deaths.

From:
Ministry of Defence and Veterans UK
Published
10 July 2024
 
s300_IMG_20240710_112959520_HDR.jpg

Pipe Major William Mitchell plays the lament during the rededication service (Crown Copyright)

A rededication service was held today, 10 July 2024, at the soldiers’ gravesides in Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC), Dadizeele New British Cemetery. The service was organised by the MOD’s Joint Casualty and Compassionate Centre (JCCC), also known as the ‘MOD War Detectives’, and was attended by serving soldiers of The Royal Irish Regiment. 

JCCC Caseworker, Rosie Barron, said: 

Both 2ndLt Bryson and 2ndLt Cunningham had been fighting on the Western Front since 1914 and were commissioned shortly before their deaths. These were two very capable professional soldiers who would have known that the end of the war was in sight, and yet continued to do their duty to the end. It has been an honour to organise this rededication service today and to see their sacrifice honoured. 

Joseph Bryson arrived on the Western Front on 11 November 1914. He was awarded the Belgian Croix de Guerre in April 1918, and the Military Cross on 25 September 1918.  

By October 1918 the static fighting associated with the Western Front had ended, and allied forces were advancing eastwards. On 6 October 1918, 2ndLt Bryson was killed by a shell while on patrol, aged 30. His body fell behind enemy lines but was recovered 7 days later and buried nearby. 

William Cunningham arrived on the Western Front on 15 December 1914. He was Commissioned into 4th Battalion The Royal Irish Fusiliers in 1918 and attached to 1st Battalion. 

On 1 October 1918, 1st Battalion The Royal Irish Fusiliers attacked Hill 41. Heavy resistance was met, but Twig Farm was captured, and a line was established north and south of the location. The battalion suffered very heavy casualties, and 2ndLt Cunningham was among those killed, aged 27.  

After the war, the remains of 2ndLt Bryson and 2ndLt Cunningham were recovered and buried next to each other in Dadizeele New British Cemetery as unknown second lieutenants. One of the sets of remains was found with medal ribbons – an invaluable clue which would help significantly with the identification of 2ndLt Bryson’s grave. As Bryson and Cunningham’s locations were unknown at the end of the war, they were commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial to the missing.  

More recently, a researcher submitted evidence to CWGC hoping to identify the final resting places of 2ndLt Bryson and 2ndLt Cunningham. Further investigation by CWGC, the National Army Museum and JCCC confirmed their findings. 

IMG_20240710_113318828_HDR.jpg

Roy Stratton, the great nephew of Second Lieutenant Bryson, was presented with a Union Flag (Crown Copyright)

The service was conducted by the Reverend Jason Clarke MBE CF, Chaplain to 1st Battalion The Royal Irish Regiment. He said: 

2ndLt Joseph Bryson was clearly a man of great courage, having shown his bravery in the cavalry charge of the Royal Irish Hussars, and had the notable honour of both a mention in dispatches and the Belgian Croix de Guerre, before his commission to The Royal Irish Fusiliers where he was once again honoured with the Military Cross. To receive such honours illustrates the qualities of a fine man, a bold leader and a courageous soldier. 2ndLt William Cunningham came through the ranks to become a leader in the 4th Battalion The Royal Irish Fusiliers. He demonstrated the qualities of one who could lead in the midst of war, and who stood with his men to the end of his life. His example inspires all who serve.

IMG_20240710_113930262_HDR.jpg

The family of Second Lieutenant Joseph Bryson MC stand with the military party at his graveside in Dadizeele New British Cemetery (Crown Copyright)

The headstone over the grave was replaced by CWGC.  

Geert Bekaert, Area Director for the CWGC, said:  

Caring for the graves of 2ndLt Joseph Bryson MC and 2ndLt William Cunningham of The Royal Irish Fusiliers is both a privilege and an honour. The CWGC is unwavering in its dedication to ensuring that these servicemen, who made the ultimate sacrifice, are remembered with the utmost dignity and respect in perpetuity. Our commitment extends beyond the present, reaching into the future, where their memory will endure for generations to come.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...