Jump to content
Free downloads from TNA ×
The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

US/UK 1913 Bayonet with Home Guard issue


navydoc16

Recommended Posts

I am currently doing a complete audit of my collection after many years. I thought I would share a fun one here that took me a while to find. I only collect commonwealth bayonet so buying it was a stretch…. But I felt it was justified. 
 

Started off life in the with the British contract at Remington for the Pattern ‘14 rifle but never issued - made in SEP 1917. In the M1917 book it states that they were unfinished blanks and partially completed and completed bayonets absorbed into the US arsenal and finished as US M1917 bayonets despite being British accepted and marked. Scabbard is an early type and was the US effort to use what remained of the British order of scabbards, but using the US mounting system. The bayonet was struck with the “waffle” pattern and remarked U.S., new US pattern grips with out ribs were fitted and she went off to the Great War. 

None the less, after it’s wartime use or perhaps lack in this case noting the condition, it appears it was refurbished and placed in storage sometime in the 20’s as a lot of m1917’s were. During WW2, the US sent to the UK as part of the lend lease and during the first acceptance the grips were cut with a single line to mimic the P14 bayonet to denote it was for a M1917 rifle(despite the fact that the bayonets matched both rifles. It appears to once again have not seen much use during WW2 as the cosmoline is still thick across the bayonet and in the nooks. 
 

enjoy 

 

kind regards

g

03B92482-9A8F-4BDB-9E79-D7FE13D98A4A.jpeg

CFE13DF6-9157-45E2-9ECE-E81A30133702.jpeg

DD92FE92-2106-47C7-858E-4A33E4A71A56.jpeg

843AB904-C274-45A4-B214-0954D5DA9573.jpeg

D4EBA9E6-2883-4701-8B5A-F0A174371342.jpeg

B0FC9FA0-2E8E-4909-9EA0-B4E88982DF2F.jpeg

6BA14160-E170-461A-B63D-F652E3087348.jpeg

313B3B15-F816-4A06-AA48-A836C1552784.jpeg

86E1E6A2-9CF3-485D-A24E-9CBAC84361C3.jpeg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Your bayonet is a standard P1913 that was made right towards the end of the British contract. It was fully completed but when the contract was terminated these were taken into US service and with the US overstamp applied, they essentially became M1917. I have a couple of these that I have posted on the forum in the past.

Your scabbard is a new made 2nd Pattern M1917 scabbard. These were not made from British leftovers but were designed and made later specifically for the M1917 bayonet. I note it has the GF Oval stamp on the chape which indicates an M1917 component supplier. It may have a faint makers name still imprinted in the leather somewhere along the seam. These were originally green in colour but yours was most likely blackened in HG service.

The timber grips are definitely non-standard to the bayonet and are probably P1907 grips used as replacements somewhere along the line. The refurbishment of the blade is also obviously non-standard as I don't believe they were ever blackened in service. Perhaps in a later period in a different Army, but of that I am not sure.

Cheers,  SS 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

Thanks a bunch, allways learning new things, hence the post. 
 

I just finished reading that the Americans were re-using the scabbards, but I have indeed missed the leather section at the back that is missing on mine- I’m not very familiar with the US pattern gear. I have found a couple examples of folks saying the “New Made” second iteration of the scabbard was still made from existing left over parts initially made for the British until they ran out.  
 

My understand from reading about the lend lease from various sources are that the Americans took equipment from storage and sent that immediately to the UK where they were inventoried and distributed. The US were at the same time actively refurbishing existing soiled stock from storage of both 1903 (for their own use) and M1917. It references “parkerising”but I wonder if they meant blackening in terms of newly refurbished M1917 blades as this is quite a rough finish on mine. Curious thing is that I assume the grips were completed at the same time or soon after, they have been paired for along time. 
 

more to ponder, thanks SS
 

kind regards

g

 

Edited by navydoc16
Link to comment
Share on other sites

14 minutes ago, shippingsteel said:

Here are a couple of mine to compare with (see below) ... I managed to track down my very old thread.! Both of these examples came out to Australia, most likely during WW2.

Cheers,  SS

https://www.greatwarforum.org/topic/185731-a-nice-little-stash-of-bayonets/

Thanks a bunch for the link, now I do live in Australia so more digging to do. I find the home guard stuff quite a fun subset. 
 

I also have a Home Guard Pike bayonet, I can’t find any good photos online, so might be time to dig it out and get some photos for all to see 

 

kind regards

g

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As I recall, around 20-25 years ago in the UK there were a lot of P1913 and M1917 bayonets for sale - often with a leather P1939 frog attached. I assume they were ex-Home Guard examples that had emerged from the estates of deceased previous owners or their relatives.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A few more photos of my crossover P1913/M1917 examples. Both IN and OUT of storage. Their scabbards are in excellent condition.

Cheers,  SS 

Screenshot_2021-12-22-08-29-52-43.png.65b035a4e0229c5532820d84673566a3.png.e3f98d9ea3d71472b2150f0733e29ab6.png

IMG_20200411_225726.jpg.828c633e79e691ec6334563624ac7f3b.jpg.d413710dd69190f6d38f7fe3d1a18d3d.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My only current example has red paint in the  ribs on the grips.  I had been told it was from Home Guard use, though I have always kept Indian DP use in the back of my mind.  Anyone knowledgeable about such things?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, DisasterDog said:

My only current example has red paint in the  ribs on the grips.  I had been told it was from Home Guard use, though I have always kept Indian DP use in the back of my mind.  Anyone knowledgeable about such things?

I have and Indian DP Pattern 1914 rifle and it has red/white striping, same with SMLEs. Some DP'd SMLEs had single white bands also.

I have a number of DP stamped Indian and Indian used P1907 bayonets s and all the Indian DP bayonets I have seen have had only single white bands on them.

A red band is of course associated with UK Home Guard use of M1917 rifles in 30.06 to avoid confusion with P1914 in .303, but the twin grooves in the handle should have been sufficient to distinguish a P1913/M1917 bayonet from a P1907 without the need for red paint. I have not seen examples of red paint bands on Home Guard bayonets (although I have seen red striped rifles and they are well documented)

All of which is to say apparently I am less knowledgeable on this matter than I thought I was when I started the post!

Chris

Add pics

Indian DP Drilled Chamber P14

DP-pattern-1914.jpg.a2368cec20a1c0e7b2f72ce0a0621176.jpg

Indian DP Drilled Chamber No1Mk3* (1970 manufcature)

DP-indian.jpg.1da06e78679e5001fda2ac042654162b.jpg

Indian DP (no drilled chamber) SMLE MkIII* 

DP-Indian-2.jpg.283413c6f87a3dce9085d0b3fd4ac99f.jpg

Edited by 4thGordons
add pics
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, 4thGordons said:

I have and Indian DP Pattern 1914 rifle and it has red/white striping, same with SMLEs. Some DP'd SMLEs had single white bands also.

I have a number of DP stamped Indian and Indian used P1907 bayonets s and all the Indian DP bayonets I have seen have had only single white bands on them.

A red band is of course associated with UK Home Guard use of M1917 rifles in 30.06 to avoid confusion with P1914 in .303, but the twin grooves in the handle should have been sufficient to distinguish a P1913/M1917 bayonet from a P1907 without the need for red paint. I have not seen examples of red paint bands on Home Guard bayonets (although I have seen red striped rifles and they are well documented)

All of which is to say apparently I am less knowledgeable on this matter than I thought I was when I started the post!

Chris

Add pics

Indian DP Drilled Chamber P14

DP-pattern-1914.jpg.a2368cec20a1c0e7b2f72ce0a0621176.jpg

Indian DP Drilled Chamber No1Mk3* (1970 manufcature)

DP-indian.jpg.1da06e78679e5001fda2ac042654162b.jpg

Indian DP (no drilled chamber) SMLE MkIII* 

DP-Indian-2.jpg.283413c6f87a3dce9085d0b3fd4ac99f.jpg

I wouldent say I know exactly and the Indian system as it was quite “lacking in formality” for a lot of the century, however I can confirm DP bayonets refurbished by India straight from the factory are painted with a white stripe. I have several unissued examples straight from storage. 
 

naturally the rifles were painted Red with white striping. I have examples of Ross, P14 and Lee Enfields as DP arms. Curiously like the SMLE pictured above, they also painted the magazine on my Ross.

For home guard use, I understanding is that initially there was a lot more “fussing” over the rifles and bayonets not being standard pattern arms then they were later. And they are painted a lot more including the bayonets with various White and Red striped and variations. As home guard units were poorly trained and weaponed initially with multitude of small arms of various calibers especially after Dunkirk when anything .303 was handed back in for service to free up SMLEs and No.4s for the front line. In the later period there was enough M1917s and ammunition quantities to arms entire towns HG, so it became a lot less of an issue. but initially there is well documented stories of 3 blokes sharing a M1917 and 20 rounds. 
 

the US exported to Britain approx half a million M1917s with bayonets, a lot were refurbished and in stores from post WW2 and sent out under lend lease. Following that alot were refurbished and sent out to the UK after the US significantly underestimated their domestic capacity to produce weapons. 
 

As stated above by SS, alot of M1903 and M1917 were left behind in Australia post war, ammunition and arms were sent initially to equip US Marine divisions in the Pacific, but was quickly un-necessary with the tide of the war and new arms production. 
 

for along time, a gunsmith in Broken Hill made target rifles and hunting rifles from the strong M1917 actions left behind, I bought a stack of “Unissued” condition stocks from him which were stripped from rifles that got custom stocks. 
 

Kind regards

g

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, DisasterDog said:

My only current example has red paint in the  ribs on the grips.  I had been told it was from Home Guard use, though I have always kept Indian DP use in the back of my mind.  Anyone knowledgeable about such things?

If it is Indian it is normally easy to tell, they are heavily polished, markings almost obliterated. Typical Indian black paint and the grips are often changed to a different type of tropical wood. Plus the DP marks.

Any photos of the markings?

kind regards

g

Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, peregrinvs said:

As I recall, around 20-25 years ago in the UK there were a lot of P1913 and M1917 bayonets for sale - often with a leather P1939 frog attached. I assume they were ex-Home Guard examples that had emerged from the estates of deceased previous owners or their relatives.

Around the late 90s and early 2000’s a lot of cadet, school shorting teams and paramilitary school type organisations finally went out of Vogue with stricter safety regulations and a less interested generation so they closed their doors and they sold their stock off.
 

They were an easy dumping ground for many years for excess equipment from the various Armed forces. A lot of beautiful unissued gear was found in the late 90s in Australia. And I had friends who purchased alot of collectable Parker Hale target rifles and bayonets from various school shooting teams and cadets in the UK and NZ in the last 20 years. 
 

it is not inconceivable to think the 1913 bayonets were held in these type of organisation as they often had no idea what they had stored in their warehouse and were often not allowed to sell anything. 
 

kind regards

g

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Found another photo of my previously discussed P1913/M1917 bayonets. Posting this shot as it better shows the original sandblasted finish of the blade together with the line of bluing over the ricasso.

post-52604-0-61849800-1440563529.jpg.47b088ac91714fb7e8e8cfadda4bddaa.jpg

Regarding the blackening of the blade in the OP, my memory finally triggered and I remember there was mention of some refurbishment of the US inventory coming out of storage during WW2. As I indicated earlier my scabbards have had the tip of the chape drilled out with a small hole, which I believe has something to do with the Tropical conditions that were expected to be encountered in the Pacific war.

Also in my collection I have a pretty rare full-length M1905 bayonet for the M1903 Springfield rifle that has had the blade blackened. It was originally a bright blade with pre WW1 date I think, but has been refurbished with a black coating which has quite a smell to it still. It came out of another long-term collection and had obviously been in storage for quite a period. Came with a green plastic Beckwith USN scabbard IIRC. Just another example of US military equipment sent out to Australia as mentioned.

Cheers,  SS

PS. It is partially shown here in this photo below that I happened to find on my phone. In amongst a mixed pile of other stuff. :unsure:

IMG_20240403_132404.png.5eeceb50fac419d97968388f8965f86b.png

Edited by shippingsteel
Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, shippingsteel said:

Found another photo of my previously discussed P1913/M1917 bayonets. Posting this shot as it better shows the original sandblasted finish of the blade together with the line of bluing over the ricasso.

post-52604-0-61849800-1440563529.jpg.47b088ac91714fb7e8e8cfadda4bddaa.jpg

Regarding the blackening of the blade in the OP, my memory finally triggered and I remember there was mention of some refurbishment of the US inventory coming out of storage during WW2. As I indicated earlier my scabbards have had the tip of the chape drilled out with a small hole, which I believe has something to do with the Tropical conditions that were expected to be encountered in the Pacific war.

Also in my collection I have a pretty rare full-length M1905 bayonet for the M1903 Springfield rifle that has had the blade blackened. It was originally a bright blade with pre WW1 date I think, but has been refurbished with a black coating which has quite a smell to it still. It came out of another long-term collection and had obviously been in storage for quite a period. Came with a green plastic Beckwith USN scabbard IIRC. Just another example of US military equipment sent out to Australia as mentioned.

Cheers,  SS

PS. It is partially shown here in this photo below that I happened to find on my phone. In amongst a mixed pile of other stuff. :unsure:

IMG_20240403_132404.png.5eeceb50fac419d97968388f8965f86b.png

Yes the US like the UK and Australia refurbished and demarcated “reserve” weapons in the years post WW1. The M1917s were graded and packed for storage but they were basically forgotten about during the years of peace. 
 

When they started selling M1917 to the UK and Canada at the beginning of WW2 it was noted that a lot had been soiled from 20 years sometimes improper storage during “The Great Depression”.

During the very early years of the war before the involvement of the US, the US refurbished a lot of M1903s and M1917s for sale their own use as USMC, Militia and National Guard. 

There are many examples of M1917s with WW2 dated replacement barrels with black or parkerised finishes circa 1940 and 1941. My understanding of the program is that very early on several things happened all at once and the US eventually gave up on refurbishing M1917s and simply “lend leased” them out “AS IS”- and despite the fact the US had a lot more 1903s in stores than M1917s. Remembering that the Pattern’14/M1917 production line after WW1 was completely worn out from the Great War- everything was out of spec and the US decided it was going to be their reserve arm so it was not maintained so the tooling was broken up and scrapped.

- in May 1940 British went through Dunkirk and very much needed rifles very quickly and began exploring the US manufacturing base

- as every one knows the British engaged no.4 manufacturers for setting up tooling for the No4 Lee Enfield new production at Savage.  

However by Dec 1940 British engaged Remington for 500,000 1903s “hybrid”rifles in .303 and the UK government paid for the full retooling and restoration of existing 1903 production. For an intended production line to start in 12 months based on the better condition tooling and the significant quantity of existing spares especially aged stock blanks (this was a significant issue for rifle production)

the British thought the 1903 re-tooling would be a cheap and cost effective way to stop gap .303 rifles.

However in 1941 the No.4 rifle production in the US had matured to the point the UK abandoned the 1903 Hybrid project

So the US now had a nearly complete existing production line set up for construction of 1903s and signifiant spares taken from storage and awaiting the production line. So they scrapped all the work done to make the rifle .303 and went back to 30.06 production of the M1903. 

hence after Dec 1941 and Pearl Harbour  the signifiant remainder of various condition remaining M1917s were sent to Canada and the UK in their current state and non-refurbished. Which freed up manpower away from refurbishment work deemed no longer necessary. And the US made the 1903 their reserve arm. 

long winded way of saying - yes M1917 rifles were refurbished in the US but only for a very short period of time. I have a feeling the bayonets were FR for an even shorter time as they were slightly not as essential. I don’t think the M1917s and various older equipment were initially refurbished specifically for the Pacific in 1942 - but actually refurbished over the previous 3 years and then eventually diverted along with existing reserve arms to the US war effort to assist in shortages of the M1 Garand especially in the USMC which was famously under-armed for the initial conflict. 

kind regards

g


 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 hours ago, navydoc16 said:

If it is Indian it is normally easy to tell, they are heavily polished, markings almost obliterated. Typical Indian black paint and the grips are often changed to a different type of tropical wood. Plus the DP marks.

Any photos of the markings?

kind regards

g

 

IMG_2918.jpeg

IMG_2919.jpeg

IMG_2920.jpeg

IMG_2921.jpeg

IMG_2922.jpeg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
7 hours ago, DisasterDog said:

 

IMG_2918.jpeg

IMG_2919.jpeg

IMG_2920.jpeg

IMG_2921.jpeg

IMG_2922.jpeg

I have a feeling this may be a factory refurbishment by children who have found a M1917 :P 

in all seriousness, the red grips are definately non standard, nor is the green paint on the scabbard. Now it is most certainly has not been made DP by the usual suspects as there are no Indian markings at all. 
 

You may be looking at something completed by a less organised country in a jungle climate that received M1917s post WW2 and likely had ammunition 30.06 as a “standard” but also the scabbard and frog appears to be Tropical Australian if it is original- my mind is going to the Phillipines or New Guinea for some reason. Someone also appears to have been trying to clear rust from the cross guard and eating up the scales. 

in summary- might be 3rd world “military” or might be just kids being kids- but is lacking the tell tale sword fighting nicks to the blade common with kids.

kind regards

g

Edited by navydoc16
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here’s one from a friend of mine who was gonna replace the damaged painted grips.

 

IMG_2926.jpeg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, DisasterDog said:

Here’s one from a friend of mine who was gonna replace the damaged painted grips.

 

IMG_2926.jpeg

Interesting, his appears to not have been painted as much as yours has been, hence my comment, his also has no white remnants. 
unfortunately we will probably not be able to distinct them as being from the same origin. 
is his bayonet a P1913 or a M1917?

But certainly not Indian or UK home guard ect. The storage is on the very poor side given the browned look and the grips have the distinct look of those who have been sitting in a rural police station in some backwater with no servicing. But also lack the bad pitting expected of something kept in a wet scabbard in a shed for 50 years and never maintained- if that analogy makes sense.
 

a lot of the times in NG and the Phillipines they are actually used for longer than the rifles had ammunition for the sake of crowd control and the general “look” of being pointy and dangerous. I know in NG they took the ammunition away from all the local police as they kept commuting Coups 

Kind regards

g

Edited by navydoc16
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It should also be noted that of the maybe 50+ odd HG bayonets I have been offered or seen in my life. All have been in rather excellent condition. As a general statement they came from storage, to home guard use for a couple years where they had limited outdoor exposure and were simply never returned.

Kind regards

g

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, navydoc16 said:

in all seriousness, the red grips are definately non standard, nor is the green paint on the scabbard. Now it is most certainly been made DP by the usual suspects as there are no Indian markings at all. 
 

...... but also the scabbard appears to be Tropical Australian or British if it original

Can I ask what about the scabbard makes it TROPICAL?  (are you referring to the frog as opposed to the scabbard?) if so it looks like a p37 frog that has had green blanco applied

The green paint on the scabbard is not hugely uncommon in my experience - painting concealed metal was officially endorsed as a replacement for disassembly and greasing on rifles and other weapons during WWII and appears to have been broadly interpreted as I have a number of scabbards so painted (and most post war used Indian scabbards have the locket and chape painted with heavy black enamel

I will check the references but I believe M1917s were supplied to Philippine coast watchers (etc) during WWII .

 

EDIT THIS LINK SHOWS USE OF THE M1917 in Philippines and elsewhere

 

7 minutes ago, navydoc16 said:

It should also be noted that of the maybe 50+ odd HG bayonets I have been offered or seen in my life. All have been in rather excellent condition. As a general statement they came from storage, to home guard use for a couple years where they had limited outdoor exposure and were simply never returned.

 

When you are referring to HG in these threads are we talking the British LDV/HG or an Australian/NZ variant? I would agree that the ones I have seen in the UK (and I have just one with known HG use) were in excellent condition.

 

Chris

Edited by 4thGordons
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
33 minutes ago, 4thGordons said:

Can I ask what about the scabbard makes it TROPICAL?  (are you referring to the frog as opposed to the scabbard?) if so it looks like a p37 scabbard that has had green blanco applied

The green paint on the scabbard is not hugely uncommon in my experience - painting concealed metal was officially endorsed as a replacement for disassembly and greasing on rifles and other weapons during WWII and appears to have been broadly interpreted as I have a number of scabbards so painted (and most post war used Indian scabbards have the locket and chape painted with heavy black enamel

I will check the references but I believe M1917s were supplied to Phillipine coast watchers (etc) during WWII .

 

When you are referring to HG in these threads are we talking the British LDV/HG or an Australian/NZ variant? I would agree that the ones I have seen in the UK (and I have just one with known HG use) were in excellent condition.

 

Chris

Alot of Australian Green frogs and Green scabbards are referred to as “tropical” as the Australian refurbed them green for use as part of the Army Armourers orders- I believe the title was called “Tropicalising Equipment” or something similar. We arrived in the Pacific campaign with cream coloured everything and required it to be green dyed in the field before the army orders arrived.

When the orders did arrive were to paint weapons below the wood line with Tropical Paint (which was green) for rust protection - although it was never specifically mentioned-  some armourers decided to paint under the grips on bayonets, others decided to paint the entire scabbard metal. Hence my comment perhaps it found its way to someone where where they were given M1917s along with Commonwealth equipment, which was generally around the pacific during WW2 and there after. 
 

paint on scabbards green is not “uncommon” but that particular particular green is almost too similar to the Aussie- I’m wondering if it is indeed an Australian issued scabbard, maybe the practice was picked up my whatever “Military” ended up with it but that seems a stretch in my book.
 

the Red grips may be a red-herring as we are referring to as it is sometimes associated with HG or DP use. but it may have nothing to do with that and may have something to do with signifying “Police” or something like that in whatever country used it post war.

Australia and NZ HG never used P14s or M1917- even in any real quantity, I believe NZ had a a couple thousand P14s and Australia had under a thousand. I’m sure there are some rare photos out there. 

Edited by navydoc16
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 03/04/2024 at 14:17, shippingsteel said:

Found another photo of my previously discussed P1913/M1917 bayonets. Posting this shot as it better shows the original sandblasted finish of the blade together with the line of bluing over the ricasso.

post-52604-0-61849800-1440563529.jpg.47b088ac91714fb7e8e8cfadda4bddaa.jpg

Regarding the blackening of the blade in the OP, my memory finally triggered and I remember there was mention of some refurbishment of the US inventory coming out of storage during WW2. As I indicated earlier my scabbards have had the tip of the chape drilled out with a small hole, which I believe has something to do with the Tropical conditions that were expected to be encountered in the Pacific war.

Also in my collection I have a pretty rare full-length M1905 bayonet for the M1903 Springfield rifle that has had the blade blackened. It was originally a bright blade with pre WW1 date I think, but has been refurbished with a black coating which has quite a smell to it still. It came out of another long-term collection and had obviously been in storage for quite a period. Came with a green plastic Beckwith USN scabbard IIRC. Just another example of US military equipment sent out to Australia as mentioned.

Cheers,  SS

PS. It is partially shown here in this photo below that I happened to find on my phone. In amongst a mixed pile of other stuff. :unsure:

IMG_20240403_132404.png.5eeceb50fac419d97968388f8965f86b.png

I had a chat to my dealer her in AUS, and he still has 5 basically unissued- Parkerised 1917 pattern bayonets. 

There is not much interest in them here, so I might have to pick up a couple just for fun

 

Kind regards,

g

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 03/04/2024 at 14:17, shippingsteel said:

Found another photo of my previously discussed P1913/M1917 bayonets. Posting this shot as it better shows the original sandblasted finish of the blade together with the line of bluing over the ricasso.

post-52604-0-61849800-1440563529.jpg.47b088ac91714fb7e8e8cfadda4bddaa.jpg

Regarding the blackening of the blade in the OP, my memory finally triggered and I remember there was mention of some refurbishment of the US inventory coming out of storage during WW2. As I indicated earlier my scabbards have had the tip of the chape drilled out with a small hole, which I believe has something to do with the Tropical conditions that were expected to be encountered in the Pacific war.

Also in my collection I have a pretty rare full-length M1905 bayonet for the M1903 Springfield rifle that has had the blade blackened. It was originally a bright blade with pre WW1 date I think, but has been refurbished with a black coating which has quite a smell to it still. It came out of another long-term collection and had obviously been in storage for quite a period. Came with a green plastic Beckwith USN scabbard IIRC. Just another example of US military equipment sent out to Australia as mentioned.

Cheers,  SS

PS. It is partially shown here in this photo below that I happened to find on my phone. In amongst a mixed pile of other stuff. :unsure:

IMG_20240403_132404.png.5eeceb50fac419d97968388f8965f86b.png

From Gary Cunningham -Bayonet Points

“Following World War One and again after World War Two, many thousands of the Model 1917 bayonets were cleaned and refinished when necessary. The earlier refinish was a fairly dark and smooth Parkerizing, while later versions tend to be lighter in color and somewhat more granular.”

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...