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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

Anthony Norman Ellis 1896 - 1975


Gains

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I’m interested to find out more about this chap. He joined the west riding regiment then transferred to the royal engineers. Looking at his papers i can see that he was wounded and that he was a prisoner of war. I’ve attached what’s left of his service records in the hope that someone can tell me in more details about his military life

IMAGES OBTAINED FROM WAR RECORDS ARCHIVES 

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Have you had a look at the ICRC records? Not the easiest site  to search due to misspellings and some unusual filing. 
However, this is likely to give you details of his date of capture, whether he was injured when captured or not and which camp/camps he was held at. 
Once you have found his index card you will find one or more reference numbers prefixed by PA, type these into the search box to reveal the detail. If you are lucky there may also be a number prefixed by R, this will provide details of his repatriation. 
The National Archives are currently offering free access to war diaries (after you register which is also free). This will give you the day to day movements of his battalion. Some are quite informative and others only state the bare minimum.
His medal roll index card shows he was awarded the BWM and VM. This indicates that he didn’t  serve in a theatre of war until on or after the 1/1/16 though he could have joined up prior to this date and remained in the UK (training etc). I generally use Ancestry to view MICs as occasionally there are details on the reverse which other sites don’t include. In this case though the reverse is blank. 
Hope this helps.

Simon
 

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The ICRC records shows that he was taken prisoner at St Quentin on the 21st March 1918 (image courtesy of the ICRC)

Ellis.jpg

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@Gains -- are the two images that you posted the only images you have seen? If not, there are more to see in his service record.

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He is named in the Times 24/07/1916 - Official Casualty List -Wounded - RE. I do not have access to the Times Digital Library any more so I can not tell if it is under Wounded, Shock (Shell) or gas but his B 103 records gsw.

@Terry_Reeves might have some info.

Brian

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29 minutes ago, Allan1892 said:

@Gains -- are the two images that you posted the only images you have seen? If not, there are more to see in his service record.

I have a few other documents obtained from the forces war records website but I’ve never heard of ICRC.

here’s some more information I have courtesy of forces war records 

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42 minutes ago, mancpal said:

Have you had a look at the ICRC records? Not the easiest site  to search due to misspellings and some unusual filing. 
However, this is likely to give you details of his date of capture, whether he was injured when captured or not and which camp/camps he was held at. 
Once you have found his index card you will find one or more reference numbers prefixed by PA, type these into the search box to reveal the detail. If you are lucky there may also be a number prefixed by R, this will provide details of his repatriation. 
The National Archives are currently offering free access to war diaries (after you register which is also free). This will give you the day to day movements of his battalion. Some are quite informative and others only state the bare minimum.
His medal roll index card shows he was awarded the BWM and VM. This indicates that he didn’t  serve in a theatre of war until on or after the 1/1/16 though he could have joined up prior to this date and remained in the UK (training etc). I generally use Ancestry to view MICs as occasionally there are details on the reverse which other sites don’t include. In this case though the reverse is blank. 
Hope this helps.

Simon
 

Brilliant thanks. I’ve never heard of ICRC. Is that a subscription website?

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ICRC is the International Commitee of the Red Cross and it’s free to search. The records, being compiled by the Germans, may account  for spelling errors. Imagine being a German clerk trying to understand a strong Scottish or Welsh accent!

Simon

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1 hour ago, Allan1892 said:

The ICRC records shows that he was taken prisoner at St Quentin on the 21st March 1918 (image courtesy of the ICRC)

Ellis.jpg

I’ve had a look at the ICRC and its not very user friendly. Here’s his index card but I can’t find any other documents relating to him on ICRC.

index courtesy of forces war records 

 

IMG_9904.png

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I believe he was with "A"  Special Company, 1st Battalion, Special Brigade.

With regard to his wounding there was a large operation on the night 26 June and early morning on the 27th on III Corp front in which A Coy participated  An annex to the battalion war diary shows that 5 men were killed and 6 died of wounds and a further 66 were wounded , 59 of whom suffered from gas poisoning. 

The battalion war diary for this period can be downloaded from TNA free of charge ref WO95.121/1.

With regard to his capture in 1918, the men of A Coy were in action near St Quentin and had five men missing. The war diary reference is WO95 241/1  1 March 1917 - 21 May 1918.

 

Edited by Terry_Reeves
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44 minutes ago, Terry_Reeves said:

I believe he was with "A"  Special Company, 1st Battalion, Special Brigade.

With regard to his wounding there was a large operation on the night 26 June and early morning on the 27th on III Corp front ion which A Coy participated  An annex to the battalion war diary shows that 5 men were killed and 6 died of wounds. a further 66 were wounded , 59 of whom suffered from gas poisoning. 

The battalion war diary for this period can be downloaded from TNA free of charge ref WO95.121/1.

With regard to his capture in 1918, the men of A Coy were in action near St Quentin and had five men missing. The war diary reference is WO95 241/1  1 March 1917 - 21 May 1918.

 

This is excellent information I appreciate your help. Was it normal to transfer regiments during the war. He started out in the west riding regiment. 

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14 minutes ago, Gains said:

This is excellent information I appreciate your help. Was it normal to transfer regiments during the war. He started out in the west riding regiment. 

Many men in the Special Brigade had been transferred from other units. Initially, the first 4 special companies, who formed in 1915,  were all volunteers. When the Special Companies were expanded into a brigade size organisation there were many transfers from the infantry and the Royal Field Artillery.. The  majority were compulsory transfers.

TR

Edited by Terry_Reeves
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Gains,

His date of capture is significant in that it was the day the German army launched Operation Michael, the Kaisers last major effort to defeat the  allies. 
With regard to men changing regiment during the war it was often after an injury or sickness. When injury occurred, frequently replacements were sent from an IBD to make numbers up to strength. This in turn mean’t that when an injured soldier had recovered, his boots had been filled within his battalion so to speak and he would be sent to whichever unit needed manpower the most at that time. 
There are many examples of men who served with many regiments during the war not through choice but necessity. 
I note that his ICRC card stated he was at Giessen camp. He may well have been there for a time though often the large camps acted as an admin centre (postal address if you like) while the actual prisoners, after assessment, had been sent to work in smaller satellite work camps under the control of the main camp. Giessen was also a POW camp during WW2.
My grandfather was listed at 3 major camps (Dulmen, Limburg and Gustrow) though I’ve never found any proof he was at either of the first 2. I consider you are fortunate in that the initial documents you posted contain his repatriation date, after 30yrs of searching I still don’t know when my Grandad arrived home !

Simon

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