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Brigadier James Stewart - Indian Army


heydey

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Hello.  I'm researching a family member with a common name and little information.  I know that in 1918, he was serving in India, specifically in Grass Farm Department (I can locate him at that time in Bareilly).  He was born around 1891. I know from a descendant's marriage certificate that he had died before 1954, as he was listed as "Brigadier Indian Army".  Nowhere does it mention that he has a middle name.  It's scant information and 'James Stewart" is a common name, but can anyone please help me? Thank you.

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14 hours ago, heydey said:

Hello.  I'm researching a family member with a common name and little information.  I know that in 1918, he was serving in India, specifically in Grass Farm Department (I can locate him at that time in Bareilly).  He was born around 1891. I know from a descendant's marriage certificate that he had died before 1954, as he was listed as "Brigadier Indian Army".  Nowhere does it mention that he has a middle name.  It's scant information and 'James Stewart" is a common name, but can anyone please help me? Thank you.

If you can say more about his origins, such as date of birth and where he was born / home town, then some of the excellent genealogical detectives who frequent here might be able to help.  The Indian Army “Military Farms Department” was unique to the British-Indian Army and had no equivalent at home.  British officers were usually seconded (attached) to it from other corps of the army.

“Military Farms were established by the British Army for production and supply of hygienic, wholesome and fresh cows milk to troops located in various garrisons across the then British-India. The first Military Farm was set up on 01 Feb 1889 with the establishment of Military Farm Allahabad . Thereafter a large number of Military Farms were set up which by 1947 numbered over 100 units mostly in the present Central, Southern and Western Command.” 

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Edited by FROGSMILE
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6 minutes ago, FROGSMILE said:

If you can say more about his origins, such as date of birth and where he was born / home town, then some of the excellent genealogical detectives who frequent here might be able to help.  The Indian Army “Military Farms Department” was unique to the British-Indian Army and had no equivalent at home.  British officers were usually seconded (attached) to it from other corps of the army. 

Thank you for replying. Unfortunately that’s all the information I have. If I knew his place of birth then I might be able to find out how he got into the army but alas, not. 

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5 minutes ago, heydey said:

Thank you for replying. Unfortunately that’s all the information I have. If I knew his place of birth then I might be able to find out how he got into the army but alas, not. 

With just a first name and family name, that are also very common, then it will be quite difficult.  The only good thing is his supposed rank, which if accurate should narrow things down a little.  Any information you can give such as siblings names or wife’s name might also help, but I know nothing personally about genealogy, I just wonder in admiration at those who do. 

Edited by FROGSMILE
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10 hours ago, heydey said:

I know that in 1918, he was serving in India, specifically in Grass Farm Department (I can locate him at that time in Bareilly).  He was born around 1891. I know from a descendant's marriage certificate that he had died before 1954, as he was listed as "Brigadier Indian Army". 

Hi @heydey and welcome to the forum :)

It's going to be really helpful if you can expand a bit more on why \ how you "know" the above bits of information as they clearly don't all come from one source. It will save others from going over old ground and may suggest routes to investigate.

So for example the only reason I can think of that a deceased relative would be mentioned on a marriage certificate would be if he was the father of the bride or groom. If their birth can be traced then that would give a likely place of where James was stationed, and a birth certificate might well give fathers occupation. The General Registrars record of British Army births might also give unit, as might a birth notice in the Times of India - transcriptions available on the FIBIS website. https://www.fibis.org/

From a birth record it might then be possible to track down a marriage from similar sources - again giving location and potentially his rank and unit under grooms location. It would also allow for a focussed search of contemporary newspapers looking for reports of the wedding, which in turn might give biographical details.

Given his age and occupation in 1918 it is unlikely that he had made Brigadier General at that point of his Army career so likely he stayed on into peacetime soldiering.

The 1921 Census of England & Wales included overseas garrisons of the British Army. The 1911 equivalent did include barracks returns for the British Officers of some Indian Army units - unfortunately I don't know if the same is true of the 1921 Census.  I don't subscribe but the free search on the FindMyPast brings up the following individuals whose 1921 location is given as "Army" which would normally indicate they were overseas.

1921CensusPossibles050423.png.3623b2781a284f3471a2267eeedf6887.png

Image courtesy FindMyPast.

Assuming he was a post-war peacetime soldier and already an officer I then tried looking for him in the December 1919 British Army List. https://digital.nls.uk/british-military-lists/archive/109453913
I'm not readily spotting a J. Stewart serving with the Indian Army. Candidates with middle names were:-
J.A. Stewart - but he'd been a Lieutenant Colonel since the 22nd August 1914.
J.H.K. Stewart - but he'd been a Lieutenant Colonel since the 1st June 1916, a Brevet Colonel since the 10th March 1917 and was then a Temporary Brigadier General. He'd also found time to graduate from the staff college and win the D.S.O.
Sir J.M. Stewart - but he'd been a Major General since the 3rd June 1915.(James Marshall Stewart 1861-1943 according to Wikipedia)
J.M.V. Stewart - a Major since the 1st September 1915. (James Montgomery Vansittart Stewart 1877-1956 according to his papers in the National Archive)
J. St.C. D. Stewart - a Major since the 1st September 1915.
There may well be more - several other potential candidates are listed as appearing in columns that have actually been massively contracted down, (over 100 columns reduced to 1) and their names don't appear, so I suspect the index has got out of step with the downsizing of the post-war Army.

Of course James could also have been a middle name.

Cheers,
Peter

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2 minutes ago, PRC said:

Hi @heydey and welcome to the forum :)

It's going to be really helpful if you can expand a bit more on why \ how you "know" the above bits of information as they clearly don't all come from one source. It will save others from going over old ground and may suggest routes to investigate.

So for example the only reason I can think of that a deceased relative would be mentioned on a marriage certificate would be if he was the father of the bride or groom. If their birth can be traced then that would give a likely place of where James was stationed, and a birth certificate might well give fathers occupation. The General Registrars record of British Army births might also give unit, as might a birth notice in the Times of India - transcriptions available on the FIBIS website. https://www.fibis.org/

From a birth record it might then be possible to track down a marriage from similar sources - again giving location and potentially his rank and unit under grooms location. It would also allow for a focussed search of contemporary newspapers looking for reports of the wedding, which in turn might give biographical details.

Given his age and occupation in 1918 it is unlikely that he had made Brigadier General at that point of his Army career so likely he stayed on into peacetime soldiering.

The 1921 Census of England & Wales included overseas garrisons of the British Army. The 1911 equivalent did include barracks returns for the British Officers of some Indian Army units - unfortunately I don't know if the same is true of the 1921 Census.  I don't subscribe but the free search on the FindMyPast brings up the following individuals whose 1921 location is given as "Army" which would normally indicate they were overseas.

1921CensusPossibles050423.png.3623b2781a284f3471a2267eeedf6887.png

Image courtesy FindMyPast.

Assuming he was a post-war peacetime soldier and already an officer I then tried looking for him in the December 1919 British Army List. https://digital.nls.uk/british-military-lists/archive/109453913
I'm not readily spotting a J. Stewart serving with the Indian Army. Candidates with middle names were:-
J.A. Stewart - but he'd been a Lieutenant Colonel since the 22nd August 1914.
J.H.K. Stewart - but he'd been a Lieutenant Colonel since the 1st June 1916, a Brevet Colonel since the 10th March 1917 and was then a Temporary Brigadier General. He'd also found time to graduate from the staff college and win the D.S.O.
Sir J.M. Stewart - but he'd been a Major General since the 3rd June 1915.(James Marshall Stewart 1861-1943 according to Wikipedia)
J.M.V. Stewart - a Major since the 1st September 1915. (James Montgomery Vansittart Stewart 1877-1956 according to his papers in the National Archive)
J. St.C. D. Stewart - a Major since the 1st September 1915.
There may well be more - several other potential candidates are listed as appearing in columns that have actually been massively contracted down, (over 100 columns reduced to 1) and their names don't appear, so I suspect the index has got out of step with the downsizing of the post-war Army.

Of course James could also have been a middle name.

Cheers,
Peter

Thank you Peter for looking. I have used the FIBIS site but didn’t have much luck. The middle name doesn’t appear in the records I have. It is a frustratingly common name!
 

As I said earlier, he was in Bareilly in 1918 - that I have from his marriage certificate to a Violet Keatinge.  Violet later is recorded in England in 1926 (no mention of James) and later established a long-term relationship with a married man. It is unclear if they ever married as I can’t find divorce records or a second marriage certificate for Violet. They had 2 children in 1918 and 1920 and it shows their births were registered in Allahabad; I don’t have birth certificates as these are transcriptions so I don’t know if his rank would have been recorded on these. 

I have been searching this on and off for years. I feel I’ve got to where I can on the genealogical research (looked at find my past and ancestry) but I’m not familiar with British army research particularly in India.  Truly, any help is enormously appreciated. 

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1 hour ago, PRC said:

Hi @heydey and welcome to the forum :)

It's going to be really helpful if you can expand a bit more on why \ how you "know" the above bits of information as they clearly don't all come from one source. It will save others from going over old ground and may suggest routes to investigate.

So for example the only reason I can think of that a deceased relative would be mentioned on a marriage certificate would be if he was the father of the bride or groom. If their birth can be traced then that would give a likely place of where James was stationed, and a birth certificate might well give fathers occupation. The General Registrars record of British Army births might also give unit, as might a birth notice in the Times of India - transcriptions available on the FIBIS website. https://www.fibis.org/

From a birth record it might then be possible to track down a marriage from similar sources - again giving location and potentially his rank and unit under grooms location. It would also allow for a focussed search of contemporary newspapers looking for reports of the wedding, which in turn might give biographical details.

Given his age and occupation in 1918 it is unlikely that he had made Brigadier General at that point of his Army career so likely he stayed on into peacetime soldiering.

The 1921 Census of England & Wales included overseas garrisons of the British Army. The 1911 equivalent did include barracks returns for the British Officers of some Indian Army units - unfortunately I don't know if the same is true of the 1921 Census.  I don't subscribe but the free search on the FindMyPast brings up the following individuals whose 1921 location is given as "Army" which would normally indicate they were overseas.

1921CensusPossibles050423.png.3623b2781a284f3471a2267eeedf6887.png

Image courtesy FindMyPast.

Assuming he was a post-war peacetime soldier and already an officer I then tried looking for him in the December 1919 British Army List. https://digital.nls.uk/british-military-lists/archive/109453913
I'm not readily spotting a J. Stewart serving with the Indian Army. Candidates with middle names were:-
J.A. Stewart - but he'd been a Lieutenant Colonel since the 22nd August 1914.
J.H.K. Stewart - but he'd been a Lieutenant Colonel since the 1st June 1916, a Brevet Colonel since the 10th March 1917 and was then a Temporary Brigadier General. He'd also found time to graduate from the staff college and win the D.S.O.
Sir J.M. Stewart - but he'd been a Major General since the 3rd June 1915.(James Marshall Stewart 1861-1943 according to Wikipedia)
J.M.V. Stewart - a Major since the 1st September 1915. (James Montgomery Vansittart Stewart 1877-1956 according to his papers in the National Archive)
J. St.C. D. Stewart - a Major since the 1st September 1915.
There may well be more - several other potential candidates are listed as appearing in columns that have actually been massively contracted down, (over 100 columns reduced to 1) and their names don't appear, so I suspect the index has got out of step with the downsizing of the post-war Army.

Of course James could also have been a middle name.

Cheers,
Peter

Good point - I hadnt suspected James could be a middle name although I wonder if it would have been permissible to use middle names as first names on marriage and birth records

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It’s interesting that two children were born in Allahabad, that you might have noticed was the first ever Military Farm when the concept was established, which suggests to me that it probably became the headquarters and depot for them all.  I say this because a separate corps was established to run the farms with its own insignia and uniform.  There will have been a church there where the children will almost certainly have been baptised.  I hesitate to draw her in, but forum stalwart @MaureenE  might be able to comment on that aspect.  As a British officer your subject will most likely have been attached from the British Army ‘departmental corps’ as a primary source, but with British-Indian Army ‘combatant corps’ as a secondary source (the latter perhaps men medically downgraded, or sometimes simply older and coming towards the end of their service).  If the former of these two sources, then his likely origin would be with the Army Service Corps seconded to the Supply and Transport Corps of the British-Indian Army (later Royal Indian Army Service Corps).  Alternatively, he might be Army Ordnance Department seconded to the British-Indian Army equivalent, but that is less likely.  In either case he would be attached to the Military Farms from his parent corps.  For the grass farm department his responsibility was to provide fodder to, e.g. facilitate the sustenance of mobile columns, etc.

As a final observation the subsequent relationship of his wife, Violet, might be because he was killed, or died of disease, given that you have no indication what the circumstances were, and so she might have been a widow when she commenced her subsequent relationship with the married man.  As well as the possibility of tropical diseases (that were endemic, e.g. cerebral malaria), there was also heart disease and Cancer of course.  Finally there was a short, but fierce war with Afghanistan in 1919, and it’s not impossible that he became a casualty there, as the British-Indian government was caught out and juggling the demands of WW1 and a famine, at the same time as the situation on the Afghanistan border called for extra troops.  As a result, available men and officers were called in from unexpected sources to make up the numbers.  This included logistics specialists as well as combatant troops.  If he died at Bareilly then there will be Parish burial records where his name should come up.

I’m sure that you will have already thought of some of these aspects and I am really in a sense just speaking my thoughts out loud with these comments.

NB.  There is an interesting magazine article concerning the military farms here: https://openthemagazine.com/features/dispatch/the-last-animal-farm/

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Edited by FROGSMILE
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2 hours ago, heydey said:

As I said earlier, he was in Bareilly in 1918 - that I have from his marriage certificate to a Violet Keatinge.

Do I take it from that that he married into your family line, as you are not sure of his place and date of birth? Presumably fathers' name and occupation on the marriage certificate isn't enough to narrow down the possibilities and so start to build a skeleton family tree? A will following a fathers' death or an unmarried sibling might mention James and so at least extend out the time he was known to be alive, while a newspaper report on those deaths might limit the period when he himself died \ confirm he was still alive.

The National Library of Scotland has Army Lists for the Great War and Second World War period - but it's a bit of a trawl. Even if he served in both there is no guarantee he was serving at the outbreak of either conflict or that he was still serving at the end. Given the slow pace of inter-war promotion however it's more like he made Brigadier General in WW2 even if it meant he was recalled from the Reserve List. https://digital.nls.uk/british-military-lists/archive/97343435

The half yearly and annual lists tend to have more detail and at various points the information extends to date and place of birth.

Archive.org also has the Indian Army Lists for the inter-war period.

2 hours ago, heydey said:

They had 2 children in 1918 and 1920 and it shows their births were registered in Allahabad

I'd forgotten what a pain it is to work out how to order a copy of the overseas certificates - it's something I've never done so have no practical experience of.  I take it you have the year and page number from the Army Returns to the GRO index already?

Did both return to England with Violet, or did either remain living with the father or were educated at his expense?

I believe any service records are likely to be held at the British Library - hopefully Maureen will be along shortly to give you chapter and verse:)

Cheers,
Peter

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The marriage is on Findmypast

He was 27, a bachelor married at Bareilly 8 April 1918 "Grass Farm Department"

The first baptism is on Findmypast, although I couldn't find the second, which however is on Familysearch

The first baptism, for Douglas James Stewart was 2nd December 1918, (birth 29th October) at Allahabad Cantts. He was Lieut. Military Grass Farms

The second baptism I couldn't find in Findmypast. Possibly it may have been mis transcribed and is there under another name, but some records are missing, so it may not be there at all. The transcription from FamilySearch is

NameMargaret Stewart

SexFemale

Christening Date23 Oct 1920

Christening PlaceBengal, India

Christening Place (Original)Calcutta, Bengal, India

Birth Date16 Sep 1920

BirthplaceCalcutta, Bengal, India

Father's NameJames Stewart

Father's SexMale

Mother's NameViolette Irene

Mother's SexFemale

Event TypeChristening

Note this shows the baptism to be in Calcutta. Above a post says the birth was registered in Allahabad? Was this information through the GRO Indexes?

The marriage doesn't mention that he was an officer, so he may have been one then, or perhaps he may have become one during 1918.  You would expect that his appointment would be in the London Gazette. I had a quick look but couldn't see anything obvious. I  would expect him to be on the India Unattached List, see the FIBIS Fibiwiki page https://wiki.fibis.org/w/Unattached_List   If there was a period when he was not an officer, there may be some records at the British Library, but probably not for an officer.

You would expect him to appear in the Indian Army Lists. See the FIBIS Fibiwiki page https://wiki.fibis.org/w/Indian_Army_List_online. I had a quick look in the July 1918 edition, but couldn't see anything obvious, but he may not have been an officer in July 1918.

Maureen

Edit If he became a Brigadier, his Service records probably would be with the Ministry of Defence. See https://wiki.fibis.org/w/British_Army#Army_personnel_serving_after_January_1921 for details.

Edited by MaureenE
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4 hours ago, MaureenE said:

The marriage is on Findmypast

He was 27, a bachelor married at Bareilly 8 April 1918 "Grass Farm Department"

The first baptism is on Findmypast, although I couldn't find the second, which however is on Familysearch

The first baptism, for Douglas James Stewart was 2nd December 1918, (birth 29th October) at Allahabad Cantts. He was Lieut. Military Grass Farms

The second baptism I couldn't find in Findmypast. Possibly it may have been mis transcribed as is there under another name, but some records are missing, so it may not be there at all. The transcription from FamilySearch is

NameMargaret Stewart

SexFemale

Christening Date23 Oct 1920

Christening PlaceBengal, India

Christening Place (Original)Calcutta, Bengal, India

Birth Date16 Sep 1920

BirthplaceCalcutta, Bengal, India

Father's NameJames Stewart

Father's SexMale

Mother's NameViolette Irene

Mother's SexFemale

Event TypeChristening

Note this shows the baptism to be in Calcutta. Above a post says the birth was registered in Allahabad? Was this information through the GRO Indexes?

The marriage doesn't mention that he was an officer, so he may have been one then, or perhaps he may have become one during 1918.  You would expect that his appointment would be in the London Gazette. I had a quick look but couldn't see anything obvious. I  would expect him to be on the India Unattached List, see the FIBIS Fibiwiki page https://wiki.fibis.org/w/Unattached_List   If there was a period when he was not an officer, there may be some records at the British Library, but probably not for an officer.

You would expect him to appear in the Indian Army Lists. See the FIBIS Fibiwiki page https://wiki.fibis.org/w/Indian_Army_List_online. I had a quick look in the July 1918 edition, but couldn't see anything obvious, but he may not have been an officer in July 1918.

Maureen

Edit If he became a Brigadier, his Service records probably would be with the Ministry of Defence. See https://wiki.fibis.org/w/British_Army#Army_personnel_serving_after_January_1921 for details.

Thank you for responding Maureen, the birth and baptism records are really helpful.

Although it’s not impossible, his age at marriage of 27 would make him quite young to be commissioned from the ranks later that year.  I suppose he might have previously been a swiftly promoted warrant officer from the ASC**, and on the Indian Unattached List as you’ve suggested, but it really needs more evidence to be teased out if we’re to be sure.  To have reached Brigadier would also have been quite unusual if he originated in the ranks, although the accelerated promotion opportunities of WW2 did sometimes facilitate that kind of advancement.

The more I look into the Military Farms and his role specifically in a “Grass Farm” the more I think it likely that he was seconded to the Supply and Transport Corps, which in the 1920s became the Royal Indian Army Service Corps and where it’s likely he specialised.  I think that’s where he should be looked for in the Indian Army List.

**a 1st or 2nd Class Staff Sergeant Major (SSM), the equivalent of Ordnance services related Conductor and Sub Conductor.

 

Edited by FROGSMILE
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So James was aged 27 when he married on the 8th April 1918 – so if we accept his age as correct then he could have been born at any time between the 9th April 1890 and the 8th April 1891.

I note that the familysearch transcript for the wedding has his wife as Violetta Irene and those for the two baptisms have her as Violette Irene.

And according to the transcript on familysearch his fathers name was also James Stewart. But the transcript doesn’t stretch towards telling us fathers’ occupation and whether the father was still alive. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FGJS-HPC

A search for James Stewart’s, son of James Stewart, born in India c1890, didn’t bring up any obvious matches.

Changing the search to England brings up a few potential baptisms on familysearch of a James Stewart with no middle name, son of James. But a check of the 1891 census would seem to make them unlikely future Brigadiers, for those James were the sons of Labourers and Iron Moulders.

One however did stand out -  James Stewart, son of James Reid Stewart and Eleanor Stewart, was baptised at Jesmond, Northumberland on the 30th July 1890. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QGTG-67BS

And the birth of a James Stewart, mothers’ maiden name Hedley, was registered with the civil authorities in the Newcastle upon Tyne registration district in the July to September quarter, (Q3), of 1890.

On the 1891 Census of England & Wales the 9 month old “Jas” Stewart, born Newcastle on Tyne, was recorded living at 4 Windsor Crescent, Jesmond. This was the household of his parents James R., (35, born Newcastle on Tyne) and Eleanor, (30 born South Hetton, County Durham). Father James works as a Tea Dealer and is an employer. The couple have three older children – all boys – William, (6), Herbert, (4) and Hedley, (1), who are living with them. The household runs to three live in servants, although two are then shown under occupation as Nurse.

By the time of the 1901 Census of England & Wales the family had moved to Park House, St. Oswalds, Durham. Father James Reid Stewart is still recorded as a Tea Dealer. Of their children only Hedley, (11) and James, (10), were still at home.  The household now runs to four servants – a Groom, Cook and two housemaids.

The Stewart family were to be found on the 1911 Census of England & Wales at Millfield House, Eldon Place, Newcastle On Tyne. James Reid Stewart, (55, Tea Dealer) and Eleanor Stewart, (50), state they have been married 30 years and the union has produced 5 children, of which 4 were then still alive. Still single and living at home were Herbert, (24, Shipping Clerk), Hedley, (21, Insurance Clerk) and James, (20 Apprentice to Building Contractor). There were also three live in servants.

(The marriage of a James Reid Stewart to an Eleanor Hedley was registered in the Darlington District of County Durham in Q3 1881).

I’m not readily spotting James on the 1921 Census of England & Wales. Father James Reid Stewart , a tea dealer, of Millfield House, Eldon Street, Newcastle upon Tyne, died on the 8th September 1919. His wife Eleanor was appointed admistrator of his will.JamesReidStewart1919Probatesourcedprobatesearchgovuk.png.cfc35a5a3aeb98d15f43281d50d19f01.png

Image courtesy https://probatesearch.service.gov.uk/

His death appears to have been reported in many of the regional papers.

FindMyPastscreenshotJamesReidStewart1919.png.d46c434d38bcf12b384b3b26343cc1bf.png

Sample image courtesy of FindMyPast, but will also be on the British Newspaper Archive. I don’t have a subscription so can’t check them out further, but hopefully the contents might help rule in James junior as a possibility or show him to be a complete red herring.

If those articles are unhelpful I believe this piece from 1915 refers to two of his older brothers, one being Hedley Stewart, a 2nd Lieutenant in the Durham Light Infantry who was then wounded. That may also reference what James was up to.

FindMyPastscreenshotHedleyStewart1915.png.db0533a077abac8416b780f5b45b9706.png

Image courtesy FindMyPast.

HedleyStewartMiCsourcedAncestry.jpg.19d61d50fe5233f8f154e6f7ce792102.jpg

Medal Index Card for Hedley Stewart courtesy Ancestry

I believe their mother Eleanor  Stewart died on the 4th May 1930, with probate being granted at the Newcastle upon Tyne Court to William Stewart, retired merchant, and Lancelot Hedley Booth, solicitor. Her estate was valued at £51,654 11s 2d – roughly £2.36 million in 2023, just allowing for inflation.
EleanorStewart1930Probatesourcedprobatesearchgovuk.png.d6b3bef79fd76545174e90e5c3a3b45b.png

Image courtesy https://probatesearch.service.gov.uk/

Of course “your” James Stewart could have been born anywhere and I’ll try widening the net if this Newcastle lad isn’t your man.

Cheers,
Peter

Edited by PRC
1) 05/04 Typos and formatting 2) More typos
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2 hours ago, PRC said:

So James was aged 27 when he married on the 8th April 1918 – so if we accept his age as correct then he could have been born at any time between the 9th April 1890 and the 8th April 1891.

I note that the familysearch transcript for the wedding has his wife as Violetta Irene and those for the two baptisms have her as Violette Irene.

And according to the transcript on familysearch his fathers name was also James Stewart. But the transcript doesn’t stretch towards telling us fathers’ occupation and whether the father was still alive. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FGJS-HPC

A search for James Stewart’s, son of James Stewart, born in India c1890, didn’t bring up any obvious matches.

Changing the search to England brings up a few potential baptisms on familysearch of a James Stewart with no middle name. But a check of the 1891 census would seem to make them unlikely future Brigadiers, for those James were the sons of Labourers and Iron Moulders.

One however did stand out -  James Stewart, son of James Reid Stewart and Eleanor Stewart, was baptised at Jesmond, Northumberland on the 30th July 1890. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QGTG-67BS

And the birth of a James Stewart, mothers’ maiden name Hedley, was registered with the civil authorities in the Newcastle upon Tyne registration district in the July to September quarter, (Q3), of 1890.

On the 1891 Census of England & Wales the 9 month old “Jas” Stewart, born Newcastle on Tyne, was recorded living at 4 Windsor Crescent, Jesmond. This was the household of his parents James R., (35, born Newcastle on Tyne) and Eleanor, (30 born South Hetton, County Durham). Father James works as a Tea Dealer and is an employer. The couple have three older children – all boys – William, (6), Herbert, (4) and Hedley, (1), who are living with them. The household runs to three live in servants, although two are then shown under occupation as Nurse.

By the time of the 1901 Census of England & Wales the family had moved to Park House, St. Oswalds, Durham. Father James Reid Stewart is still recorded as a Tea Dealer. Of their children only Hedley, (11) and James, (10), were still at home.  The household now runs to four servants – a Groom, Cook and two housemaids.

The Stewart family were to be found on the 1911 Census of England & Wales at Millfield House, Eldon Place, Newcastle On Tyne. James Reid Stewart, (55, Tea Dealer) and Eleanor Stewart, (50), state they have been married 30 years and the union has produced 5 children, of which 4 were then still alive. Still single and living at home were Herbert, (24, Shipping Clerk), Hedley, (21, Insurance Clerk) and James, (20 Apprentice to Building Contractor). There were also three live in servants.

(The marriage of a James Reid Stewart to an Eleanor Hedley was registered in the Darlington District of County Durham in Q3 1881).

I’m not readily spotting James on the 1921 Census of England & Wales. Father James Reid Stewart , a tea dealer, of Millfield House, Eldon Street, Newcastle upon Tyne, died on the 8th September 1919. His wife Eleanor was appointed admistrator of his will.JamesReidStewart1919Probatesourcedprobatesearchgovuk.png.cfc35a5a3aeb98d15f43281d50d19f01.png

Image courtesy https://probatesearch.service.gov.uk/

His death appears to have been reported in many of the regional papers.

FindMyPastscreenshotJamesReidStewart1919.png.d46c434d38bcf12b384b3b26343cc1bf.png

Sample image courtesy of FindMyPast, but will also be on the British Newspaper Archive. I don’t have a subscription so can’t check them out further, but hopefully the contents might help rule in James junior as a possibility or show him to be a complete red herring.

If those articles are unhelpful I believe this piece from 1915 refers to two of his older brothers, one being Hedley Stewart, a 2nd Lieutenant in the Durham Light Infantry who was then wounded. That may also reference what James was up to.

FindMyPastscreenshotHedleyStewart1915.png.db0533a077abac8416b780f5b45b9706.png

Image courtesy FindMyPast.

HedleyStewartMiCsourcedAncestry.jpg.19d61d50fe5233f8f154e6f7ce792102.jpg

Medal Index Card for Hedley Stewart courtesy Ancestry

I believe their mother Eleanor  Stewart died on the 4th May 1930, with probate being granted at the Newcastle upon Tyne Court to William Stewart, retired merchant, and Lancelot Hedley Booth, solicitor. Her estate was valuded at £51,654 11s 2d – roughly £2.36 million in 2023, just allowing for inflation.
EleanorStewart1930Probatesourcedprobatesearchgovuk.png.d6b3bef79fd76545174e90e5c3a3b45b.png

Image courtesy https://probatesearch.service.gov.uk/

Of course “your” James Stewart could have been born anywhere and I’ll try widening the net if this Newcastle lad isn’t your man.

Cheers,
Peter

Absolutely brilliant research in your usual style Peter, that family certainly seems to fit within the bounds that we have so far.

 I wonder if anyone can track him down in the Indian Army List and his subsequent promotions in the London Gazette.

Edited by FROGSMILE
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On 05/04/2023 at 15:08, MaureenE said:

The marriage is on Findmypast

He was 27, a bachelor married at Bareilly 8 April 1918 "Grass Farm Department"

The first baptism is on Findmypast, although I couldn't find the second, which however is on Familysearch

The first baptism, for Douglas James Stewart was 2nd December 1918, (birth 29th October) at Allahabad Cantts. He was Lieut. Military Grass Farms

The second baptism I couldn't find in Findmypast. Possibly it may have been mis transcribed and is there under another name, but some records are missing, so it may not be there at all. The transcription from FamilySearch is

NameMargaret Stewart

SexFemale

Christening Date23 Oct 1920

Christening PlaceBengal, India

Christening Place (Original)Calcutta, Bengal, India

Birth Date16 Sep 1920

BirthplaceCalcutta, Bengal, India

Father's NameJames Stewart

Father's SexMale

Mother's NameViolette Irene

Mother's SexFemale

Event TypeChristening

Note this shows the baptism to be in Calcutta. Above a post says the birth was registered in Allahabad? Was this information through the GRO Indexes?

The marriage doesn't mention that he was an officer, so he may have been one then, or perhaps he may have become one during 1918.  You would expect that his appointment would be in the London Gazette. I had a quick look but couldn't see anything obvious. I  would expect him to be on the India Unattached List, see the FIBIS Fibiwiki page https://wiki.fibis.org/w/Unattached_List   If there was a period when he was not an officer, there may be some records at the British Library, but probably not for an officer.

You would expect him to appear in the Indian Army Lists. See the FIBIS Fibiwiki page https://wiki.fibis.org/w/Indian_Army_List_online. I had a quick look in the July 1918 edition, but couldn't see anything obvious, but he may not have been an officer in July 1918.

Maureen

Edit If he became a Brigadier, his Service records probably would be with the Ministry of Defence. See https://wiki.fibis.org/w/British_Army#Army_personnel_serving_after_January_1921 for details.

Thank you for your help Maureen.  I can't recall the information on the location for the second birth.  Violet herself was born in India.  Her father worked at one point as Chief Storekeeper at State Railways for HM Indian Government, and once resided at 62, Cantonments, Bareilly. I don't know if that's helpful or not.  I can't find any link between her family name and 'Stewart' to see if there was a connection.  As you say it doesn't say on the marriage that James was an officer or not.  One thought I had was that maybe James Stewart was the son of an army officer 'James Stewart' - perhaps, like Violet, born in India - but i can't find any records to support that.  What is strange is that he's listed as the late Brigadier james stewart on a later marriage certificate (for his second child) but I haven't so far found anything about him.  I presume his death is between 1920 and 1954.  I got the impression through another line in my family tree that Violet and James were separated when Violet left India and travelled with the children under her partners' surname.  They never married apparently but went on to have children (birth certificates have 'Keatinge' as mother's maiden name - she wasn't using Stewart).  

I've looked at the wiki.fibis link you have given.  It looks as though I have to provide information I don't have - like the death certificate copy - for service records.  Am I reading that correctly?

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On 05/04/2023 at 21:41, PRC said:

So James was aged 27 when he married on the 8th April 1918 – so if we accept his age as correct then he could have been born at any time between the 9th April 1890 and the 8th April 1891.

I note that the familysearch transcript for the wedding has his wife as Violetta Irene and those for the two baptisms have her as Violette Irene.

And according to the transcript on familysearch his fathers name was also James Stewart. But the transcript doesn’t stretch towards telling us fathers’ occupation and whether the father was still alive. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FGJS-HPC

A search for James Stewart’s, son of James Stewart, born in India c1890, didn’t bring up any obvious matches.

Changing the search to England brings up a few potential baptisms on familysearch of a James Stewart with no middle name, son of James. But a check of the 1891 census would seem to make them unlikely future Brigadiers, for those James were the sons of Labourers and Iron Moulders.

One however did stand out -  James Stewart, son of James Reid Stewart and Eleanor Stewart, was baptised at Jesmond, Northumberland on the 30th July 1890. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QGTG-67BS

And the birth of a James Stewart, mothers’ maiden name Hedley, was registered with the civil authorities in the Newcastle upon Tyne registration district in the July to September quarter, (Q3), of 1890.

On the 1891 Census of England & Wales the 9 month old “Jas” Stewart, born Newcastle on Tyne, was recorded living at 4 Windsor Crescent, Jesmond. This was the household of his parents James R., (35, born Newcastle on Tyne) and Eleanor, (30 born South Hetton, County Durham). Father James works as a Tea Dealer and is an employer. The couple have three older children – all boys – William, (6), Herbert, (4) and Hedley, (1), who are living with them. The household runs to three live in servants, although two are then shown under occupation as Nurse.

By the time of the 1901 Census of England & Wales the family had moved to Park House, St. Oswalds, Durham. Father James Reid Stewart is still recorded as a Tea Dealer. Of their children only Hedley, (11) and James, (10), were still at home.  The household now runs to four servants – a Groom, Cook and two housemaids.

The Stewart family were to be found on the 1911 Census of England & Wales at Millfield House, Eldon Place, Newcastle On Tyne. James Reid Stewart, (55, Tea Dealer) and Eleanor Stewart, (50), state they have been married 30 years and the union has produced 5 children, of which 4 were then still alive. Still single and living at home were Herbert, (24, Shipping Clerk), Hedley, (21, Insurance Clerk) and James, (20 Apprentice to Building Contractor). There were also three live in servants.

(The marriage of a James Reid Stewart to an Eleanor Hedley was registered in the Darlington District of County Durham in Q3 1881).

I’m not readily spotting James on the 1921 Census of England & Wales. Father James Reid Stewart , a tea dealer, of Millfield House, Eldon Street, Newcastle upon Tyne, died on the 8th September 1919. His wife Eleanor was appointed admistrator of his will.JamesReidStewart1919Probatesourcedprobatesearchgovuk.png.cfc35a5a3aeb98d15f43281d50d19f01.png

Image courtesy https://probatesearch.service.gov.uk/

His death appears to have been reported in many of the regional papers.

FindMyPastscreenshotJamesReidStewart1919.png.d46c434d38bcf12b384b3b26343cc1bf.png

Sample image courtesy of FindMyPast, but will also be on the British Newspaper Archive. I don’t have a subscription so can’t check them out further, but hopefully the contents might help rule in James junior as a possibility or show him to be a complete red herring.

If those articles are unhelpful I believe this piece from 1915 refers to two of his older brothers, one being Hedley Stewart, a 2nd Lieutenant in the Durham Light Infantry who was then wounded. That may also reference what James was up to.

FindMyPastscreenshotHedleyStewart1915.png.db0533a077abac8416b780f5b45b9706.png

Image courtesy FindMyPast.

HedleyStewartMiCsourcedAncestry.jpg.19d61d50fe5233f8f154e6f7ce792102.jpg

Medal Index Card for Hedley Stewart courtesy Ancestry

I believe their mother Eleanor  Stewart died on the 4th May 1930, with probate being granted at the Newcastle upon Tyne Court to William Stewart, retired merchant, and Lancelot Hedley Booth, solicitor. Her estate was valued at £51,654 11s 2d – roughly £2.36 million in 2023, just allowing for inflation.
EleanorStewart1930Probatesourcedprobatesearchgovuk.png.d6b3bef79fd76545174e90e5c3a3b45b.png

Image courtesy https://probatesearch.service.gov.uk/

Of course “your” James Stewart could have been born anywhere and I’ll try widening the net if this Newcastle lad isn’t your man.

Cheers,

Peter

Gosh Peter - what a lot to digest.  I appreciate your logic on the type of person that may go on to become a Brigadier.  The irish marriage caught my eye - only because Violet Keatinge's grandparents (on both sides) were born in Dublin - so maybe there was some link there.  If we presume this James Reid is the father of our James Stewart, I wonder why the father's middle name was not put in the James / Violet marriage certificate?  I know that the middle name of the father of the bride was included and wondered if it would have added some status / accuracy for the groom's father to have his middle name in there.  It's also a strange one as these are the only individuals I know of in my family tree who have no middle names assigned to them.  There was a suggestion above that James might be a middle name.  One thought I had was around James and Violet naming their first born Douglas, and whether Douglas was a family name linked to the Stewarts (as it doesn't feature in the Keatinge family).  I have looked for Douglas James and James Douglas Stewart's but haven't much luck on my first attempt.  I'd appreciate whether you think this is an avenue worth exploring further. 

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On 05/04/2023 at 14:21, PRC said:

Do I take it from that that he married into your family line, as you are not sure of his place and date of birth? Presumably fathers' name and occupation on the marriage certificate isn't enough to narrow down the possibilities and so start to build a skeleton family tree? A will following a fathers' death or an unmarried sibling might mention James and so at least extend out the time he was known to be alive, while a newspaper report on those deaths might limit the period when he himself died \ confirm he was still alive.

The National Library of Scotland has Army Lists for the Great War and Second World War period - but it's a bit of a trawl. Even if he served in both there is no guarantee he was serving at the outbreak of either conflict or that he was still serving at the end. Given the slow pace of inter-war promotion however it's more like he made Brigadier General in WW2 even if it meant he was recalled from the Reserve List. https://digital.nls.uk/british-military-lists/archive/97343435

The half yearly and annual lists tend to have more detail and at various points the information extends to date and place of birth.

Archive.org also has the Indian Army Lists for the inter-war period.

I'd forgotten what a pain it is to work out how to order a copy of the overseas certificates - it's something I've never done so have no practical experience of.  I take it you have the year and page number from the Army Returns to the GRO index already?

Did both return to England with Violet, or did either remain living with the father or were educated at his expense?

I believe any service records are likely to be held at the British Library - hopefully Maureen will be along shortly to give you chapter and verse:)

Cheers,
Peter

Hello again Peter (I'm replying in to posts in an illogical fashion!).  He's actually a great grandparent.  We've no idea on the actual date of birth (only what has been given on the marriage cert) and of course there is nothing about where he was born .  I tried searching whether he was born in India but didn't have any joy there.  Both James' children are deceased - there is no record at all about him.  James wasn't discussed apparently.  Violet's other children have no information about him - only the notion that they were separated before Violet moved herself and her children to England (with her partner and all travelling under his name) in 1926,  Violet and her new partner didn't marry but went on to have other children.  Thank you for the links.  I will have a look through - some long evenings ahead!   

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On 05/04/2023 at 12:41, FROGSMILE said:

It’s interesting that two children were born in Allahabad, that you might have noticed was the first ever Military Farm when the concept was established, which suggests to me that it probably became the headquarters and depot for them all.  I say this because a separate corps was established to run the farms with its own insignia and uniform.  There will have been a church there where the children will almost certainly have been baptised.  I hesitate to draw her in, but forum stalwart @MaureenE  might be able to comment on that aspect.  As a British officer your subject will most likely have been attached from the British Army ‘departmental corps’ as a primary source, but with British-Indian Army ‘combatant corps’ as a secondary source (the latter perhaps men medically downgraded, or sometimes simply older and coming towards the end of their service).  If the former of these two sources, then his likely origin would be with the Army Service Corps seconded to the Supply and Transport Corps of the British-Indian Army (later Royal Indian Army Service Corps).  Alternatively, he might be Army Ordnance Department seconded to the British-Indian Army equivalent, but that is less likely.  In either case he would be attached to the Military Farms from his parent corps.  For the grass farm department his responsibility was to provide fodder to, e.g. facilitate the sustenance of mobile columns, etc.

As a final observation the subsequent relationship of his wife, Violet, might be because he was killed, or died of disease, given that you have no indication what the circumstances were, and so she might have been a widow when she commenced her subsequent relationship with the married man.  As well as the possibility of tropical diseases (that were endemic, e.g. cerebral malaria), there was also heart disease and Cancer of course.  Finally there was a short, but fierce war with Afghanistan in 1919, and it’s not impossible that he became a casualty there, as the British-Indian government was caught out and juggling the demands of WW1 and a famine, at the same time as the situation on the Afghanistan border called for extra troops.  As a result, available men and officers were called in from unexpected sources to make up the numbers.  This included logistics specialists as well as combatant troops.  If he died at Bareilly then there will be Parish burial records where his name should come up.

I’m sure that you will have already thought of some of these aspects and I am really in a sense just speaking my thoughts out loud with these comments.

NB.  There is an interesting magazine article concerning the military farms here: https://openthemagazine.com/features/dispatch/the-last-animal-farm/

D1D0126A-199F-4EE7-9DF4-EEE3E881BB26.jpeg

C6767300-BC20-4965-86B7-5B3B83767921.jpeg

6403A52C-CE0A-4745-AB2D-644D268E0E8E.jpeg

3483FF93-73EE-453B-85E4-DCDE3C3B9573.jpeg

790EC1A8-0D17-4E5C-8E9F-E1051164BA9A.jpeg

8DF56EEC-919E-4028-837B-D91F229AC26A.jpeg

Thank you for these pictures and the extra information.  I actually don't know much about the Grass Farms Department and how it was established.   I have looked for death records for James Stewart in India but haven't found anything.  Of course, he may have gone to another country.  Information from a relative suggests that they separated at the time - some time between 1920 and 1926 (when Violet came to England).  

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Thank you everyone for your efforts and responses.  It is much appreciated.  I haven't been able to log in and reply for a few days and appreciate my specific replies to you all might not be consistent but hopefully I've answered any questons.  A thought had popped into my mind ... the mention of James Stewart as 'the late brigadier' is on his daughter's marriage certificate at St Paul's to someone who worked for HM Foreign Office.  Is it possible that for a person to be given a higher rank after death?... to elevate the status of this bride?  To confirm by the way, this marriage certificate reads as "the late Brigadier and Mrs James Stewart" showing they were still legally married at the time of James' death and Violet hadn't remarried at this point.  

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44 minutes ago, heydey said:

A thought had popped into my mind ... the mention of James Stewart as 'the late brigadier' is on his daughter's marriage certificate at St Paul's to someone who worked for HM Foreign Office.  Is it possible that for a person to be given a higher rank after death?... to elevate the status of this bride?  To confirm by the way, this marriage certificate reads as "the late Brigadier and Mrs James Stewart" showing they were still legally married at the time of James' death and Violet hadn't remarried at this point.

You have to bear in mind that none of the information given by the bride and groom to the person officiating at the ceremony was subject to any form of verification at that time. If they were then there would have been a lot less bigamy for a start! So names, including spelling, ages and details like fathers occupation were all whatever the individual concerned wanted them to be. Fortunately most of the time the information stands up to scrutiny but that shouldn't be taken as a given.

James Stewart could have been a lesser officer rank who acted temporarily as a Brigadier General before reverting, (although most likely to be at least a Lieutenant Colonel), or could have been promoted to that rank just before retiring in order to receive a higher pension.

I wouldn't normally clutch an individual out of the air, but the Newcastle born man certainly seems worth investigating. His father was Justice of the Peace as well as a Tea Merchant. Pure speculation on my part, but a Tea Merchant suggests he may have had contacts in India , while as a J.P. he undoubtedly had contacts in the UK, not least in recruitment into the armed forces.

From the newspaper reports posted above it looks like possibly Hedley Stewart, an officer in the Durham Light Infantry, had been wounded in action in 1915. And a check of the Commonwealth War Graves Commission website shows a Lieutenant Herbert Stewart, "son of James Reid Stewart and Eleanor Stewart, of 6, Kingsland, Newcastle-on-Tyne" who died on the 23rd April 1915. Herbert is remembered on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial so most likely killed in action. He was on the establishment of the 3rd Battalion Durham Light Infantry but attached to the 2nd Battalion Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry. https://www.cwgc.org/find-records/find-war-dead/casualty-details/915003/herbert-stewart/

Did the father pulls strings to get his youngest son James commissioned and stationed somewhere out of harms way having lost one son and with another wounded - we will probably never know, although if his officer file ever turns up for your James Stewart and it does turn out he was the Newcastle born man it will be interesting to see who recommended him and vouched for him, and the route his Army Career took.

Hopefully there will be enough information in those newspaper reports to either rule this particular James Stewart out or confirm him as the prime suspect:)

Cheers,
Peter

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50 minutes ago, Terry_Reeves said:

Would this be the man?  

 

I don't think so. That one was James Marshall Stewart, born 1861, married 1897 to a Barbara Marion and was a Major General by the end of his military career, dieing in 1943 - the man being looked for here was born c1890/91, is not known to have a middle name, married 1918 to a Violet\Violette\Violetta Irene, the marriage producing two children, one of whom, a daughter, claiming that her deceased father was a Brigadier when she married in the 1950's. Unfortunately it seems we have no shortage of James Stewart's serving as officers in the India Army. I suspect given his age there may well be a possibility that he didn't reach the rank of Brigadier until WW2.

Cheers,
Peter

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The Military Farms Department is listed as a separate entity in the Indian Army List, so in theory this considerably simplifies the task of looking for a James Stewart attached to the department in 1918, especially as the associated list of officers only runs to a single page. The problem is that a trawl through all the available Indian Army Lists from 1917 to 1921 listed on the FIBIS website doesn't produce a single individual with that name serving with the department in that time frame.

https://wiki.fibis.org/w/Indian_Army_List_online

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5 hours ago, Tawhiri said:

The Military Farms Department is listed as a separate entity in the Indian Army List, so in theory this considerably simplifies the task of looking for a James Stewart attached to the department in 1918, especially as the associated list of officers only runs to a single page. The problem is that a trawl through all the available Indian Army Lists from 1917 to 1921 listed on the FIBIS website doesn't produce a single individual with that name serving with the department in that time frame.

https://wiki.fibis.org/w/Indian_Army_List_online

Hello. I’m not sure if I’m finding the right list from the link. I’ve clicked one of the years on that page and found a James Stewart as a lieutenant but I don’t know if I’m in the right area. https://archive.org/stream/in.ernet.dli.2015.284991/2015.284991.Indian-Army_djvu.txt

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9 hours ago, PRC said:

You have to bear in mind that none of the information given by the bride and groom to the person officiating at the ceremony was subject to any form of verification at that time. If they were then there would have been a lot less bigamy for a start! So names, including spelling, ages and details like fathers occupation were all whatever the individual concerned wanted them to be. Fortunately most of the time the information stands up to scrutiny but that shouldn't be taken as a given.

James Stewart could have been a lesser officer rank who acted temporarily as a Brigadier General before reverting, (although most likely to be at least a Lieutenant Colonel), or could have been promoted to that rank just before retiring in order to receive a higher pension.

I wouldn't normally clutch an individual out of the air, but the Newcastle born man certainly seems worth investigating. His father was Justice of the Peace as well as a Tea Merchant. Pure speculation on my part, but a Tea Merchant suggests he may have had contacts in India , while as a J.P. he undoubtedly had contacts in the UK, not least in recruitment into the armed forces.

From the newspaper reports posted above it looks like possibly Hedley Stewart, an officer in the Durham Light Infantry, had been wounded in action in 1915. And a check of the Commonwealth War Graves Commission website shows a Lieutenant Herbert Stewart, "son of James Reid Stewart and Eleanor Stewart, of 6, Kingsland, Newcastle-on-Tyne" who died on the 23rd April 1915. Herbert is remembered on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial so most likely killed in action. He was on the establishment of the 3rd Battalion Durham Light Infantry but attached to the 2nd Battalion Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry. https://www.cwgc.org/find-records/find-war-dead/casualty-details/915003/herbert-stewart/

Did the father pulls strings to get his youngest son James commissioned and stationed somewhere out of harms way having lost one son and with another wounded - we will probably never know, although if his officer file ever turns up for your James Stewart and it does turn out he was the Newcastle born man it will be interesting to see who recommended him and vouched for him, and the route his Army Career took.

Hopefully there will be enough information in those newspaper reports to either rule this particular James Stewart out or confirm him as the prime suspect:)

Cheers,
Peter

I hadn’t thought of that - interesting point. I’d like to think the information given was as accurate as they knew. If I investigate the possibility it is this James R Stewart son, is there a way of finding his record, and see if he was stationed in India? 

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The link quoted above https://archive.org/stream/in.ernet.dli.2015.284991/2015.284991.Indian-Army_djvu.txt is a link to the text version of the whole book, so not very informative.

 

I did find https://archive.org/details/in.ernet.dli.2015.284991/page/n326/mode/1up but this James Stewart was a Lieutenant in the Cavalry, so probably not him.

The baptism for the 2nd child born in 1920 seems to have taken place in Calcutta. This is a speculative suggestion, but I wonder with the possible father's occupation in the tea trade, whether the son James Stewart could have also gone into the tea trade, in Calcutta. I would suggest trying to get a copy of the 1920 baptismal record, to see whether what occupation is stated. As the image for this record does not seem to be on Findmypast (when you would expect it to be- perhaps this could be clarified) this means either paying for a record from the British Library, or looking at the record at at a FamilySearch Centre or FamilySearch Affiliate Library. The latter would generally be free, unless you chose an Affiliate Library such as a genealogy Society, where a visitor research fee would typically apply.

From the FamilySearch record for the baptism  https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:HGJ1-93T2, the record comes from 

Digital Folder Number

005138472 or 

Microfilm Number

527922

and it is on page 4 of the catalogue record https://www.familysearch.org/search/catalog/143280

To read how to view at a FamilySearch Centre, see the FIBIS Fibiwiki page https://wiki.fibis.org/w/FamilySearch_Centres

heyday, you ask whether you would need to supply a copy of the death certificate to obtain a service record from the Ministry of Defence. As he  was born 1890-1891 according to the marriage details, he died long enough ago not to require a death certificate.

There is a record on the Ancestry database concerning the Ministry of Defence database https://www.ancestry.co.uk/discoveryui-content/view/28771:61448?_phsrc=Iof3&_phstart=successSource&gsfn=J*&gsln=stewart&ml_rpos=84&queryId=2cf41b05dd03f81a72f93885713a4ca4 which you would only be able to access directly if you are signed in to Ancestry (pay website) which is consistent with the details provided by PRC above, and consistent with the dob from the age on the marriage certificate.

 UK, Military Discharge Indexes, 1920-1971

Name J Stewart
Birth Date 21 Jun 1890
Service Number P97283
Rank Army Officers
Reference Number AOP000473817

Maureen

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