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What type of ship did each rank command in the Kaiserliche Marine? And what ranks lead Flotilla, Squadrons etc?


tricksor

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I know it is obvious that a Fregattenkapitan commanded a Frigate, and etc for the other officer ranks, but what ships exactly did each of the Admiral ranks command? And what about Kapitanleutnant? 

As for the other question, I'm wondering whether you would have someone like the rank of Kapitanleutnant commanding a squadron, but in that squadron there may be a Konteradmiral? Love if someone cleared this up please, thanks

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What seems obvious to you, may in fact be an over-simplification, so better off to avoid falling into the trap of equating naval ranks with naval appointments, as the correlation isn’t always as exact as you might otherwise  be imagining.

Generally speaking all  IGN Capital Ships were commanded by a ‘Kapitän zur See’,  but not every Kapt.z.S. in the Kaiser’s navy was a Capitain of a Battleship or a Battlecruiser (there were plenty of other positions both at sea and on land requiring a naval officer of that particular rank to fulfill the duties associated with specific roles).

Different grades of Flag Officers (Admirals) tended to hold senior command positions, they wouldn’t have been commanding officers of individual units of the fleet.

It might help your understanding of things to consider the organisation of the High Seas Fleet which in January 1916 was commanded by Vizeadmiral Reinhard Scheer. He’d taken over the job from Admiral Hugo von Pohl (Scheer was subsequently promoted full Admiral in June 1916). Earlier in his naval career as a Konteradmiral (Rear-Admiral) Sheer had served as commander of the Second Battle Squadron of the HSF (although for the most part, BS commanders tended to be Vice-Admirals, with a Rear Admiral serving as Second-in-command). The Chief-of-Staff of the HSF was also a position normally filled by someone with the rank of a Rear-Admiral.

At Jutland Sheer flew his flag from SMS Frederich der Grosse, whose commanding officer was Kaptitän zur See Theodor Fuchs. As previously mentioned, pretty much all battleship and battlecruiser commanding officers were Kapt.z.S. rank.

Below Kapt.z.S. came Fregattenkapitän (an officer rank that wasn’t necessarily the sole domain of a commanding officer of a frigate), and one step below that was Korvettenkapitän (this again being a naval rank not exclusively held by commanding officers of Corvettes). In USN & RN terms F.Kapt.and K.Kapt. would simply correspond to anyone holding the rank of Commander and Lieutenant-Commander, regardless of what job they were appointed to.
 

MB


 

 

Edited by KizmeRD
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4 minutes ago, KizmeRD said:

What seems obvious to you, may in fact be an over-simplification, so best not to try to equate naval ranks with naval appointments, as the correlation isn’t always as exact as you imagine.

Generally speaking all  IGN Capital Ships were commanded by a ‘Kapitän zur See’,  but not every Kapt.z.S. in the Kaiser’s navy was a Capitain of a Battleship or a Battlecruisers (there were plenty of other positions both at sea and on land requiring a naval officer of that particular rank to fulfill the duties associated with particular roles).

Different grades of Flag Officers (Admirals) tended to hold senior command positions, they wouldn’t have been commanding officers of individual units of the fleet.

It might help your understanding of things to consider the organisation of the High Seas Fleet which in January 1916 was commanded by Vizeadmiral Reinhard Scheer. He’d taken over the job from Admiral Hugo von Pohl (Scheer was subsequently promoted full Admiral in June 1916). Earlier in his naval career as a Konteradmiral (Rear-Admiral) Sheer had served as commander of the Second Battle Squadron of the HSF (although for the most part, BS commanders tended to be Vice-Admirals, with a Rear Admiral serving as Second-in-command). The Chief-of-Staff of the HSF was also a position normally filled by someone with the rank of a Rear-Admiral.

At Jutland Sheer flew his flag from SMS Frederich der Grosse, whose commanding officer was Kaptitän zur See Theodor Fuchs. Generally speaking, pretty much all battleship and battlecruiser commanding officers were Kapt.z.S. rank.

Below Kapt.z.S. came Fregattenkapitän (an officer rank that wasn’t necessarily the sole domain of a commanding officer of a frigate), and one step below that was Korvettenkapitän (this again being a naval rank not exclusively held by commanding officers of Corvettes). In the USN & RN terms F.Kapt.and K.Kapt. would simply correspond to anyone holding the rank of Commander and Lieutenant-Commander, regardless of what job they were appointed to.

MB


 

 

I see, thank you! This did clear up some things

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The rank equivalencies are actually not so straight forward! Frigates in the Royal Navy in the 18th and 19th centuries were commanded by, well, captains, though generally more junior captains. Thus a Fregattenkapitän was regarded in Britain at this time as the equivalent of a junior captain while a Korvettenkapitän was seen as equaling a commander. A Kapitänleutnant equaled a lieutenant commander while a Oberleutnant zur See was seen as equal to a lieutenant. (Sources: Jane's Fighting Ships and various entries in the Naval Staff Monograph.)

To oversimplify, admirals didn’t command a ship, but rather a squadron of ships (or senior staff position or shore instillation).  

Battleships and battlecruisers were generally commanded by a Kapitän zur See.

Modern cruisers (armored or light) were under the command of a Kapitän zur See or Fregattenkapitän.

A Korvettenkapitän might command an older cruiser or a raider of some sort or a (half) flotilla of destroyers. The executive officer or maybe the chief gunnery or navigation officer of a larger vessel also might well be a Korvettenkapitän.

Destroyers (large torpedo boats) and submarines were typically under the command of a Kapitänleutnant or a more senior Oberleutnant zur See.

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