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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Former Drill Hall 23rd London Regt on Lavender Hill


Medaler

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Firstly, sorry about this. I have not been here for weeks and when I do show up I am on the scrounge.

I am currently writing my 3rd book on the Great War memorials of the Chesterfield district. Having found a commemoration of an early casualty of the 23rd London Regt., I would love to use a copyright free image of the above drill hall where he is known to have enlisted. 

If anyone has taken or can take such an image I will gladly credit them in my completed publication. It's just a shot of the exterior that I require, so if anyone passes this building regularly it should hopefully not be too inconvenient. This is the building in question, pretty much opposite Clapham Junction railway station....

St John's Hill Drill Hall - Wikipedia

Warmest regards,

Mike

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24 minutes ago, travers61 said:

My reading of the copyright on the image on the wikipedia page you link to is that you can reuse it in a publication if the source is acknowledged.

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Territorial_Army_Centre,_Lavender_Hill_SW11_-_geograph.org.uk_-_2560323.jpg

Hello travers61,

I am not sure that this applies here, as I would need to modify the image into B&W. In addition, it does not show the whole frontage of the building and the resolution is not really good enough.

 

Warmest regards,

Mike

Edited by Medaler
More added
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I live pretty close and can go round and take an iPhone snap over the weekend if it's any help. Please tell me exactly what you need - there won't be any problem with copyright.

John

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1 hour ago, johntaylor said:

I live pretty close and can go round and take an iPhone snap over the weekend if it's any help. Please tell me exactly what you need - there won't be any problem with copyright.

John

Hello John,

That is very kind of you.

I think it could be quite a tricky building to photograph, though I am only basing that on what I have seen of it from Google Street View. Being both long and tall, it will likely need to be taken from the railway station side of the road, a little distance either up or down street from the drill hall, to get the whole of its frontage into the shot. 

I don't mind adjacent buildings in the shot, as I can always crop those out. The crucial bit is that it needs to show the whole frontage, width and height.

Warmest regards,

Mike

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Hi Mike, the main problem is that this is an extremely busy road - there are buses, lorries, and normally a queue of vehicles in both directions up and down the hill. The only way you might find it traffic-free is in the small hours of the morning, when no-one's up and about (unfortunately including me!)  However I'm happy to give it my best shot - if you can use it then all well and good, if not it's no big deal. Could you give me an idea when you need this by please?

All the best, John

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That is the good news, I am absolutely in no rush. My publication date is likely to be several months down the track from here, so pick the day and time that is least inconvenient for you.

I understand what you say about cars and buses etc. I find it quite odd that I have found no images of this place anywhere on the internet other than in that wiki. The thing that I find most interesting is that the outside of this building seems to have survived virtually unchanged since the day my man walked into it. Even the railway station across the road still has its stone inscription for the London Brighton and South Coast Railway that would have been there in his day. I just love being able to evoke the world that they knew with modern images of things that they would have seen.

If you are curious, the attached is my 23rd London man. 2233, Eric Vaughan Lewis. One of many from that unit killed near Givenchy on the 26th of March 1915.

Warmest regards,

Mike

Lewis Portrait.jpg

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I'll do my best and see what I can come up with. I had no idea about the history of the Drill Hall and was interested in the information you've provided. Incidentally the building next door is also substantially unchanged since the 1900s, from the outside at least - this is Clapham Grand, which was opened by Dan Leno (among others) as a music hall and is still used as a concert venue: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clapham_Grand

There are sure to be old photos of the drill hall though I've been through various local history books and couldn't find any. The borough archives are further up the same road and it may be worth asking them: https://www.better.org.uk/library/london/wandsworth/wandsworth-heritage-service?utm_source=google&utm_medium=organic&utm_campaign=google_my_business 

I'll keep in touch and will send a photo as soon as I can.

All the best, John

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Hi, I was passing today and there wasn't much traffic - this is a shot of the front (with perspective adjusted) which may well do the job. I also took one of the main entrance and the crest above, which is apparently the coat of arms of Lord Wandsworth.

I can always try again in a few weeks, when the weather may be better and the vandalised bus stop will hopefully have been repaired. Please drop me a PM if you have any further requests!

All the best,

John

 

IMG_1715.jpg

IMG_1717.jpg

IMG_1718.jpg

Edited by johntaylor
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Those are superb shots John, exactly what I was looking for. My sincere thanks for your kindness in doing this for me. The first of them, the full view of the frontage, is absolutely splendid. 

Having attempted to edit that 1st image myself (downloaded from here), I seem to have run into issues with the resolution. These are probably connect with how the image has been processed to be displayed on this website. I will send you a PM with my email address so that you can let me have it that way. I think that should iron everything out.

Warmest regards,

Mike

 

Edited by Medaler
Updated after experimenting with image
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It's a pleasure, and I've sent you the original jpeg via email.

All the best, John

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  • 10 months later...

hi i may be late in replying i was a member of the 23 london cadets in 1950s the drill hall was pretty much has it was in ww1 their is a 23 london history in a glass cabinet the men who had fallen in ww1the page of the book is turned each day also the 42 48 tank rgt are remberd on a large frame with gilt letter to the names g the london guards are their now it his their head quarters i have researched the 23  london for many years clandon museum which   had lots to the surreys burnt down alot was lost in the fire but the queens surrey museum has all of the war diaries on line hope this is of interest anorak

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4 hours ago, Anorak said:

hi i may be late in replying i was a member of the 23 london cadets in 1950s the drill hall was pretty much has it was in ww1 their is a 23 london history in a glass cabinet the men who had fallen in ww1the page of the book is turned each day also the 42 48 tank rgt are remberd on a large frame with gilt letter to the names g the london guards are their now it his their head quarters i have researched the 23  london for many years clandon museum which   had lots to the surreys burnt down alot was lost in the fire but the queens surrey museum has all of the war diaries on line hope this is of interest anorak

Yes, very much of interest. Looking on Google "Street View" quite a few of the other buildings near the drill hall have survived to the present day too. Perhaps surprisingly, my bloke Lewis was a Solicitor in my native Chesterfield before the war. The story goes that he enlisted in the rank and file as he didn't want to wait for a commission. He apparently tried to enlist very early on after the declaration of war in our local Sherwood Foresters (Notts & Derby) Regiment, but was told that they were "full." He had history in the London area, as he had previously been a Solicitor there with one of the Railway companies. It seems that, unable to enlist locally, he simply caught a train and then just walked the very few yards into the 23rd London drill hall. 

 

 

Edited by Medaler
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hi they dont make them like that any more a friend of the family came with me on a walking the somme no interest in ww1 he was bitten by the bug got a mobile home him and is wife went round the battle fields looking for men from new whittington cheshire he wrote a book and it was published the book called new whittingtons fallen heroes 1914 1918 by kieth white i know he gave copies to local libraries 2007 it was published  if this is of interest for your research anorak 

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After spending many years as a medal collector, I got involved in local memorials research just before the centenary. When I did, it rapidly became apparent that medals research (particularly with medals attributed to local casualties) and memorial research use exactly the same skill set. Since then, I have published books on 2 of our local memorials with this research being for a 3rd. I have been a bit lazy with it over the last year, but I will be back working on it again soon. Funny you mention New Whittington, we have a New Whittington in Chesterfield too!

 

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I would dearly like to try and get hold of a copy of that, if he has any left?

 

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hi kieth had 150 copies printed i flogged some on my war walks for him and he sold some i know he gave copies to local libraries in new whit and chesterfield i have my copy  try the libraries if not successful i could lend you my copy anorak 

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That is very kind spirited of you, but I would be looking for a copy to add to my own reference library on local memorials research.

 

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