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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

A few questions regarding wiring parties.


Felix C

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Hello Everyone,

Reading on the frequency of wiring parties and asking what was the typical composition of a WP? One man with wire spool, One to hammer wire peg, One man to hold wire peg, any security or other? How much wire was expected to be strung/restrung at night and how often was this done? Did own wire have to be removed b4 a big push so infantry could more easily pass through? Is there a difference between laying new wire and repair breaks in existing strands?

How many horizontal strands were used? I see 3 loop pegs in some photos. 

Thanks in advance.

 

 

Edited by Felix C
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Mate,

Sorry no direct on WWI, but I have been on wiring parties in later years.

The spool is carried by two men with a star picket 

The party can be any number of men depending on what work you have to do

most I have been on were groups of five (nco and 4 men), but we did small lengths of wiring.

We had no security, other then the fighting posts covering us

Mostly its to do a certain lenght of wire, mostly small lenghts, as it takes time with reduce noise

Wire came in a number of forms, single strand or concatina, at lest in my day.

either way single strand is easyer, while concatina has to be staked out with a number of posts with anti lifting

Single strand has to be staked with star pickets and the number of strands between them, is given by who sent us out, mostly it was three or four, some times with a cross brace, but types and number veried to much.

Hopefully someone with a field manuel will know more. as in practice is some times different then the books.

S.B

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Thanks as always for good info. 

I just read up on concertina wire and did not realize it was developed during the GW. Never seen it in photos. Thought interwar as do see it in SWW.

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Mate,

The problem with concertina is not to stretch it to far, as its easy to step through if to wide apart.

Wiring to me was very scarey, being stuck out side the wire, that when the poo hits the fan, you were stuck, as trying to find the patrol gaps in the dark is not much fun

Wiring can be quick or slow depending on how long your staying in that position, and how much you can get done during the day.

The gaps were opened before you went out, as the so called gaps were never left open, if I remember right, as these can be found by the enemy to be used by them or booby trapped.

I would think most of these expirences could be the same as WWI, as wiring has not changed much in 100 years.

S.B

 

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This extract is from the Field Service Pocket Book (Ammended 1916) comes from the section regarding the table of time, men and tools required for the execution of certain field work.

It details planning metrics for the construction of wire obstacles.

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Steel screw pickets for running the wire were used later in the war, Much quieter than hammering stakes and pickets in.

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