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Remembered Today:

"2nd Battalion Leinster Regiment "26- 27 March 1918"


2li
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hello

Can anyone with a interest or knowledge with the goings on on the 26-27 March 1918 and the "2nd Battalion Leinster Regiment 

I am trying to find anything that will help me understand the leading up to the death of Alfred Clift Private, (15323), 2nd Battalion Leinster Regiment

any help or links to this action much appriciated

kind regards

Philip

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Thanks Mitchelle

I have just downloaded the two war diaries but nothing on these dates found am i missing something?

thanks Philip

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Michelle

A big thank you for your help and advise

kind regards PHILIP

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Mea Culpa, I’ve sold you a mickey on Brigade, bear with me. I know they ended up in 29 Div but at the time of the March Offensive they were in the 16th Division. The OH says they were around Epehy on 21/3/18. Should be the correct brigade diary in the link. 

https://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/C14053715

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3 hours ago, 2li said:

hello

Can anyone with a interest or knowledge with the goings on on the 26-27 March 1918 and the "2nd Battalion Leinster Regiment 

I am trying to find anything that will help me understand the leading up to the death of Alfred Clift Private, (15323), 2nd Battalion Leinster Regiment

any help or links to this action much appriciated

kind regards

Philip

As part of the 47th Brigade, of 16th Irish Division, which had been completely decimated during the opening days of Operation Michael 21/23 March, the 2nd Leinster’s (who had joined from 73rd Brigade, 24th Division in February 1918) had only just been moved from VII Corps to XIX Corps of 5th Army** on 25 March 1918. The battalion remained with that formation and, whilst positioned in fluid and hasty defence lines, fought at the Battle of Rosières (26/27 March 1918), where many more casualties were suffered.

The battalion had not long absorbed the surviving rump of 7th Battalion Leinster’s plus a 250 strong reinforcement from a ‘training cadre’ remnant of 6th Connaught Rangers, in order to bring them up to a fighting strength, so many of the men had little time to feel part of their new battalion.  Movement was constant as part of a fighting withdrawal to try and establish a new line along the River Somme.

”At Rosiéres, the III Corps of the German Eighteenth Army sent wave after wave of field-gray troops against the battered XIX Corps. Machine-gun fire bloodied the German assault troops, as did artillery support. Foch ordered that Rosières be held at all costs, but this was proving difficult, as the British Fifth Army’s left flank along the Somme was open. In mid-afternoon, the Germans pushed south to a point a few miles north of the village of Harbonnières. Their goal was to roll up the British line. To halt the advance of the German 208th Division, British Brig. Gen. E.P. Riddell mounted an artillery horse and led the remnants of his 149th Brigade of the British XIX Corps in a determined counterattack that bought adjacent British units badly needed time to consolidate their positions.”

“The British XIX Corps’ section of the line held, but the Rosières position had become a salient, and the troops defending the salient were in danger of being cut off by the Germans. Foch gave permission for the XIX Corps to withdraw, which they did, barely escaping. [It was during this withdrawal in contact with the enemy that the 2nd Leinster’s suffered most of their casualties].  At the close of 27th March the Fifth Army line was now even closer to Amiens.”

To get an idea of casualties see: https://astreetnearyou.org/date/1918/03/27

**after 4-days intense and continuous combat, against the brunt of the German assault, 5th Army’s effective strength was in reality just a weakened XIX Corps.

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Edited by FROGSMILE
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A big thank you for the interesting read on the events of the 25-26-27 March I now have a good idear on the last hours of Alfreds life with the Leinsters

kind regards Philip

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48 minutes ago, 2li said:

A big thank you for the interesting read on the events of the 25-26-27 March I now have a good idear on the last hours of Alfreds life with the Leinsters

kind regards Philip

I’m glad to help Philip, but I cannot really convey sufficiently just how much 16th (Irish) Division suffered at that time, during which the survivors of the intense opening bombardments conducted a 5-day fighting withdrawal as part of the remaining rump of 5th Army.  Once the line had eventually fully stabilised the Division was evacuated back to the U.K. to be wholly reconstituted.  Due to problems with recruiting, when 16th Division did eventually return to France, it contained just a single Irish battalion, from the Royal Irish Fusiliers.

Edited by FROGSMILE
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