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Remembered Today:

Army schools


Kevin Mears
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The College - 1 Church Street, Stratford on Avon
Headmaster, and seemingly the only master/teacher and owner etc from at least 1901 until 1910
Edward George Ambrose Beckwith, MA Hons Oxford

1910 Electoral Roll for Berkshire:
Edward George Ambrose Beckwith - The Army School, Holyport Maidenhead.

1912 to 1935 Headmaster at the Imperial Service College, Windsor
Author of the book: The Soldiers Manual: Military Expressions in English, German and French.

Many of the 27 boarders later joined the military, however that is to be expected due to WW1
The oldest boarder was 30 and the youngest 12 with an average age of 17.

I think this may well be the elusive Army School in Stratford.

Still looking for the 1911 census but I think it may well have closed as there is not sign of it in the census or of Edward Beckwith

 

1901 census front.jpg

1901 page 1.jpg

Edited by ianshuter
consolidating posts
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Sorry further update and more evidence to support the The College being a Military School...
1910 Electoral Roll for Berkshire:
Edward George Ambrose Beckwith - The Army School, Holyport Maidenhead.
I am stopping there

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24 minutes ago, ianshuter said:

Sorry further update and more evidence to support the The College being a Military School...
1910 Electoral Roll for Berkshire:
Edward George Ambrose Beckwith - The Army School, Holyport Maidenhead.
I am stopping there

Brilliant research and well done indeed!  I believe that that is incontrovertible evidence that you have identified the Army crammer concerned.  It does not surprise me that it seems to have closed before the war as the small number of boarders and their varied age must have made it difficult to remain a profitable concern.  I’m sure that @Kevin Mears will be pleased.

Edited by FROGSMILE
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Thank you, I have been researching War Memorials in Warwickshire for a few years now and the one in the Cemetery at Stratford was a rare one where many of the names had no apparant connection to Stratford - which made me start to look for reason. My South Warwickshire (well south of the M6 excluding Coventry & Birmingham) database
https://www.swfhs.org.uk/index.php/war-memorial-transcriptions/new-master-index-of-the-fallen-of-ww1

From this we will build a website with photographs etc

 

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4 minutes ago, ianshuter said:

Thank you, I have been researching War Memorials in Warwickshire for a few years now and the one in the Cemetery at Stratford was a rare one where many of the names had no apparant connection to Stratford - which made me start to look for reason. My South Warwickshire (well south of the M6 excluding Coventry & Birmingham) database
https://www.swfhs.org.uk/index.php/war-memorial-transcriptions/new-master-index-of-the-fallen-of-ww1

From this we will build a website with photographs etc

 

It’s excellent work and brings the story/existence of these men into public consciousness, so what you do is admirable.  We must never lose sight of how terrible a repeat of industrialised warfare in Europe would be. 

Edited by FROGSMILE
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  • 3 weeks later...

Queen Victoria School or 'QV' and Duke of York's are still in existence today, and still supported by the Ministry of Defence. QV is my old Alma mater!

The idea of the school was originally proposed to Queen Victoria as a memorial to the Scottish dead of the Boer Wars because of her fondness for the Scots (John Brown etc) , and after her death it was thought fit to name it in her memory.  I believe the school was established by an act of Parliament as a public institution and the money to build the school was raised from Scottish servicemen and the people of Scotland to complete the project. Queen Victoria School was opened on 28 September 1908 by King Edward the seventh. The chapel was completed in 1910 and is Scotland's memorial to Queen Victoria.

The school, with its 250 orphans was run like a mini-regiment, with a School Commandant, Admin Officer and all the teachers being ex-Army officers, and a smattering of NCOs - The School Sergeant Major and the Pipe and Drum Majors today are retired Warrant officers. The school also has its own Colours, presented by the Monarch every 25 years. Its still essentially available as an orphanage with places made available for any service orphans, many of my friends were sons of Scottish Servicemen who had been killed, often on operations. Many of the boys have gone on to serve the Colours throughout the armed forces with 17 of the original boys being killed in the First World War..., some of them would then have only just been old enough to join up before the war's end. This included three brothers. The youngest boy to die was a lad called Young Watt who had joined up in 1914, at the age of 14 as a drummer-boy - he was killed in 1916. Another boy, William Tinlin, of the Scots Guards and on his way to join his unit at Gallipoli, was killed in the Gretna Green train crash (which killed 500). James Stevenson rose to the rank of sergeant before he was killed in 1917. Of the 4 boys who formed the Colour Party and received the first colours from the King at a ceremony in Balmoral in 1908, only one survived the war. All of the boys are remembered on a plaque in the School's Memorial Chapel. 

Right up until the 90's the School only had an obligation to teach the boys up until 'O Grades' (16yrs) and thereafter you were out on yer todd!...except a few (about 15 from a year of 40) who got invited back to attempt Highers. This meant many of the lads would head off on the recruiting bus to Glencourse after the last exam in 4th year to sit the Army Entrance exams...predominantly going into the regular Army as junior soldiers...with the odd few of the 5th and 6th years going for commissions and/or university degrees. Forty years ago, my year was unusual with six of us actually getting commissioned as direct entry officers. Its a little more advanced these days. 

Girls were eventually admitted in 1996.

QVS mag FINAL.inddDunblane. Queen Victoria School. | eBay

Edited by Lee Smart
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An interesting rundown of QVS, Lee.  I love the photo of the boys cheering whilst flourishing their glengarries.  Very evocative.

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3 hours ago, Lee Smart said:

Queen Victoria School or 'QV' and Duke of York's are still in existence today, and still supported by the Ministry of Defence. QV is my old Alma mater!

The idea of the school was originally proposed to Queen Victoria as a memorial to the Scottish dead of the Boer Wars because of her fondness for the Scots (John Brown etc) , and after her death it was thought fit to name it in her memory.  I believe the school was established by an act of Parliament as a public institution and the money to build the school was raised from Scottish servicemen and the people of Scotland to complete the project. Queen Victoria School was opened on 28 September 1908 by King Edward the seventh. The chapel was completed in 1910 and is Scotland's memorial to Queen Victoria.

The school, with its 250 orphans was run like a mini-regiment, with a School Commandant, Admin Officer and all the teachers being ex-Army officers, and a smattering of NCOs - The School Sergeant Major and the Pipe and Drum Majors today are retired Warrant officers. The school also has its own Colours, presented by the Monarch every 25 years. Its still essentially available as an orphanage with places made available for any service orphans, many of my friends were sons of Scottish Servicemen who had been killed, often on operations. Many of the boys have gone on to serve the Colours throughout the armed forces with 17 of the original boys being killed in the First World War..., some of them would then have only just been old enough to join up before the war's end. This included three brothers. The youngest boy to die was a lad called Young Watt who had joined up in 1914, at the age of 14 as a drummer-boy - he was killed in 1916. Another boy, William Tinlin, of the Scots Guards and on his way to join his unit at Gallipoli, was killed in the Gretna Green train crash (which killed 500). James Stevenson rose to the rank of sergeant before he was killed in 1917. Of the 4 boys who formed the Colour Party and received the first colours from the King at a ceremony in Balmoral in 1908, only one survived the war. All of the boys are remembered on a plaque in the School's Memorial Chapel. 

Right up until the 90's the School only had an obligation to teach the boys up until 'O Grades' (16yrs) and thereafter you were out on yer todd!...except a few (about 15 from a year of 40) who got invited back to attempt Highers. This meant many of the lads would head off on the recruiting bus to Glencourse after the last exam in 4th year to sit the Army Entrance exams...predominantly going into the regular Army as junior soldiers...with the odd few of the 5th and 6th years going for commissions and/or university degrees. Forty years ago, my year was unusual with six of us actually getting commissioned as direct entry officers. Its a little more advanced these days. 

Girls were eventually admitted in 1996.

QVS mag FINAL.inddDunblane. Queen Victoria School. | eBay

Thanks for all the information about QVS.

The eldest son of one of the men I researched was a boy sergeant at QVS when he was  sent his father's medals.

RM

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20 hours ago, Lee Smart said:

Queen Victoria School or 'QV' and Duke of York's are still in existence today, and still supported by the Ministry of Defence. QV is my old Alma mater!

The idea of the school was originally proposed to Queen Victoria as a memorial to the Scottish dead of the Boer Wars because of her fondness for the Scots (John Brown etc) , and after her death it was thought fit to name it in her memory.  I believe the school was established by an act of Parliament as a public institution and the money to build the school was raised from Scottish servicemen and the people of Scotland to complete the project. Queen Victoria School was opened on 28 September 1908 by King Edward the seventh. The chapel was completed in 1910 and is Scotland's memorial to Queen Victoria.

The school, with its 250 orphans was run like a mini-regiment, with a School Commandant, Admin Officer and all the teachers being ex-Army officers, and a smattering of NCOs - The School Sergeant Major and the Pipe and Drum Majors today are retired Warrant officers. The school also has its own Colours, presented by the Monarch every 25 years. Its still essentially available as an orphanage with places made available for any service orphans, many of my friends were sons of Scottish Servicemen who had been killed, often on operations. Many of the boys have gone on to serve the Colours throughout the armed forces with 17 of the original boys being killed in the First World War..., some of them would then have only just been old enough to join up before the war's end. This included three brothers. The youngest boy to die was a lad called Young Watt who had joined up in 1914, at the age of 14 as a drummer-boy - he was killed in 1916. Another boy, William Tinlin, of the Scots Guards and on his way to join his unit at Gallipoli, was killed in the Gretna Green train crash (which killed 500). James Stevenson rose to the rank of sergeant before he was killed in 1917. Of the 4 boys who formed the Colour Party and received the first colours from the King at a ceremony in Balmoral in 1908, only one survived the war. All of the boys are remembered on a plaque in the School's Memorial Chapel. 

Right up until the 90's the School only had an obligation to teach the boys up until 'O Grades' (16yrs) and thereafter you were out on yer todd!...except a few (about 15 from a year of 40) who got invited back to attempt Highers. This meant many of the lads would head off on the recruiting bus to Glencourse after the last exam in 4th year to sit the Army Entrance exams...predominantly going into the regular Army as junior soldiers...with the odd few of the 5th and 6th years going for commissions and/or university degrees. Forty years ago, my year was unusual with six of us actually getting commissioned as direct entry officers. Its a little more advanced these days. 

Girls were eventually admitted in 1996.

QVS mag FINAL.inddDunblane. Queen Victoria School. | eBay

Sounds very similar setup to Gordon’s school that I went to, right down to the year girls were allowed to attend!

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