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Remembered Today:

W. J. Gladney DCM, R. Newfoundland Regt.


michaeldr

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417 William Joseph Gladney DCM., R. Newfoundland Regt. 
Thanks to the web I have his 169 page file and I am now looking for further background information and clarification
1) His record shows a number of disciplinary offences given as “Absent from tattoo” - what exactly does this mean? Is it simply AWOL?
2) I have a general idea of his Gallipoli service, but would welcome info on his time on the WF.
He was wounded (right leg/thigh) in September 1917 – where was he serving at that time? 

Thanks in advance for any help here

Michael

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2 hours ago, michaeldr said:

417 William Joseph Gladney DCM., R. Newfoundland Regt. 
Thanks to the web I have his 169 page file and I am now looking for further background information and clarification
1) His record shows a number of disciplinary offences given as “Absent from tattoo” - what exactly does this mean? Is it simply AWOL?
2) I have a general idea of his Gallipoli service, but would welcome info on his time on the WF.
He was wounded (right leg/thigh) in September 1917 – where was he serving at that time? 

Thanks in advance for any help here

Michael

Retreat was the hour when the unit flag(s) were lowered to the sound of the duty drummer’s** sounding of ‘first post’.  It was routinely set at 6pm, but varied according to the time zones in which the garrison concerned was located.  It could often be the same hour as Guard Mount and the defaulters parade (when men undergoing punishment reported for inspection and any evening chores).  

It was followed by Tattoo at 10pm when ‘last post’ was sounded, by which time soldiers were required to have returned to barracks Michael.  So all men granted day passes had to have booked back in to the guardroom before that hour chimed.  If not there name was taken as ‘absent from tattoo’.

**in light infantry and rifles regiments the appointment was ‘bugler’.  In Scottish regiments there was also piping incorporated into these events marking the day’s routine.

NB.  Tattoo coincided with the staff parade when the guard was inspected ready for silent hours and the defaulters were checked too. It was followed one hour later by the sounding of ‘lights out’ at 11pm.

Edited by FROGSMILE
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1 hour ago, michaeldr said:

Many thanks for that clarification

I have edited the above to explain the full evening routine.

The word Tattoo is thought to have originated from the period of ‘The Glorious Revolution’ circa 1690 when a Dutch Army accompanied King William to Britain and stayed with him alongside the rump of the British Army (that had not stayed with King James II) with the two coordinating in securing garrisons across Britain.  It relates to the Dutch words Taptoe (meaning [beer] taps off), a standing order for Inn landlords to cease serving beer so that soldiers would naturally return to camp/barracks. For years afterwards during the Marlborough campaigns the British and Dutch fought as allies in the Low Countries and the military routine described became embedded in army culture. 

Edited by FROGSMILE
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Thanks again Frogsmile - really fascinating

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2 hours ago, michaeldr said:

He was wounded (right leg/thigh) in September 1917 – where was he serving at that time? 

The wounding occurred on 28  27th Sept 1917 and looking at the 88th Inf Brigade diary they (the Brigade) were at Saules Farm, with the Newfoundlanders holding the left sub-sector

Edited by michaeldr
correction to date
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14 hours ago, michaeldr said:

at Saules Farm, with the Newfoundlanders holding the left sub-sector

Can some kind Western-Fronter please oblige and indicate for me on a map the location of Saules Farm?

(It seems I easily get lost when away from the eastern-Med :()

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Time to do some tidying-up here.

Having previously only seen the Brigade WD, I have now found my way to the Battalion WD at https://www.therooms.ca/sites/default/files/war_diary_-_complete_-_sept_1915_-_feb_1919.pdf
The entry covering the period of interest here reads as follows:
25 September 1917
Battalion moved up into the line for 4 days and relieved the 4 Worcester Regt. 
In left sub-sector. Battalion Hqrs. at Wijdendrift. 
No casualties during relief but from midnight enemy shelled battalion area very heavily until noon next day. 
During tour in line there were 34 casualties 
viz; 7 killed and 27 wounded – all other ranks. 
Enemy aircraft were very active all the time and flew very low. 
Gas shells were used by the enemy frequently and on the morning of the 29th he shelled the back area heavily, as a result of which the whole personnel of the 88th Brigade was gassed. 
Fine weather and bright moonlight nights.

The position of Wijdendrift (Batt. Hqrs.) can be seen here 

image.png.91554cc54dab5f74368c4da1f72bcee1.png

Edited by michaeldr
poor spelling
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