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Remembered Today:

How did women and their families cope after the loss of their men?


Ellee
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I am researching a book, and am writing to ask your readers for any assistance they might be able to give.

 

The book  will be set in 1919 and focus on the aftermath of WW1 and Gallipoli. How did families living in the King’s Lynn and Sandringham area cope afterwards, particularly those who worked on the royal estate? Were they able to pick up the pieces of their previous lives? Were they haunted by what they saw and returned as broken men? What about the widows? Were woman and children left destitute and forced to live in workhouses? Can anyone tell me about workhouses during this time?

I like to be as true as I can to life during this period, and I very much welcome hearing from others who are able to share their ancestors’ stories. I can keep any names anonymous, I am merely seeking to establish how families in this tight knit community coped after Gallipoli, as well as the impact it had on the men who survived. Many men who signed up with the Sandringham Company would have had tied cottages. Were bereaved families able to continue living there, or were they evicted to make way for new employees?

 

The book is inspired by Harry Saward, a real royal station master who worked at Wolferton Station between 1884-1924, and his family of three daughters, Jessie, Beatrice and Ada. 

I can be contacted on (removed by moderator team) 

 

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I don't know any specific sources for King's Lynn and Sandringham but Andrea Hetherington has done research on war widows in general. I've enjoyed her talks a lot, and IIRC she also has at least one book on the subject.

 

Edited by knittinganddeath
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1 hour ago, knittinganddeath said:

I don't know any specific sources for King's Lynn and Sandringham but Andrea Hetherington has done research on war widows in general. I've enjoyed her talks a lot, and IIRC she also has at least one book on the subject.

 

 

Thank you, this looks great. I appreciate your reply. Ellee

1 hour ago, FROGSMILE said:

 

1 hour ago, FROGSMILE said:

 

Thank you Frogsmile, I can't wait to read these links! Much appreciated, Ellee

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3 minutes ago, Ellee said:

 

Thank you, this looks great. I appreciate your reply. Ellee

 

 

The 2nd and 4th links appear to me to be particularly pertinent, but the others are relevant too.

Edited by FROGSMILE
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1 hour ago, knittinganddeath said:

I don't know any specific sources for King's Lynn and Sandringham but Andrea Hetherington has done research on war widows in general. I've enjoyed her talks a lot, and IIRC she also has at least one book on the subject.

 

 

Thank you knittinganddeath, I have ordered this book. I can't wait to read it! Ellee

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I started the Andrea Hetherington book but found the style really difficult to read, made it really dull and I didn’t enjoy it. (That’s the same with most academic writing for me) I recommend The Quick And The Dead by Richard Van Emden. A much  more approachable style. 

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29 minutes ago, Michelle Young said:

I started the Andrea Hetherington book but found the style really difficult to read, made it really dull and I didn’t enjoy it. (That’s the same with most academic writing for me) I recommend The Quick And The Dead by Richard Van Emden. Amuxh more approachable style. 

Thank you Michael. I shall buy this. Ellee

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On 25/07/2022 at 16:41, Michelle Young said:

I started the Andrea Hetherington book but found the style really difficult to read, made it really dull and I didn’t enjoy it. (That’s the same with most academic writing for me) I recommend The Quick And The Dead by Richard Van Emden. A much  more approachable style. 

in addition to that I also recommend "Singled out' by Virginia Nicholson. 

Thanks to all for the references and the topic... very interesting!! 

M.

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That's a great suggestion Marilyne. Singled Out has just arrived on my door mat this morning following a recommendation elsewhere. How those poor women suffered. It makes me feel so humble.

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7 hours ago, Ellee said:

That's a great suggestion Marilyne. Singled Out has just arrived on my door mat this morning following a recommendation elsewhere. How those poor women suffered. It makes me feel so humble.

Both my parents lost their fathers during WW1, to say that they and their children’s (both had six children) lives were difficult (impoverished) would be an understatement.

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11 hours ago, derekb said:

Both my parents lost their fathers during WW1, to say that they and their children’s (both had six children) lives were difficult (impoverished) would be an understatement.

How heartbreaking and beyond our comprehension. These are the stories I want to write about derekb. Is there any chance I could speak to you about this please?

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10 hours ago, Ellee said:

How heartbreaking and beyond our comprehension. These are the stories I want to write about derekb. Is there any chance I could speak to you about this please?

Elle, yes I would be glad to help if I can.

Derek.

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On 30/07/2022 at 18:32, derekb said:

Elle, yes I would be glad to help if I can.

Derek.

Are you free to speak to me tomorrow Derek? I sent you a message with my contact details. I so look forward to speaking. Thank you so much for agreeing to this.

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