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Remembered Today:

Looking for Sergeant Walter Ramensky, German POW who spent time in Norway


knittinganddeath

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Hi all, I have drawn a blank so far and was hoping that you might be able to help.

I'm looking for Sergeant Walter Ramensky of Berlin, who spent time in Løken, Norway, during 1917/18 as a convalescent POW.

In a Norwegian newspaper announcement from 1920, Ramensky is named as the father of the child Oddvar born to Ragna Rebne in November 1918. Oddvar's baptism records give Ramensky's year of birth as 1891, his domicile as Berlin, and his rank as sergeant.

I can't find Ramensky in the Verlustlisten or the ICRC cards; have tried variations like Kamensky, Kamenski, Raminsky, Raminski, Kaminski, Kaminsky, Kasinski, etc. to no avail.

In case it's relevant, Norway only took in German POWs who had been held in Russia.

Thanks for any help!

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Can't find any Ramenskys in the Berlin directories of 1891, or 1914/1915, or 1919/1920

https://digital.zlb.de/viewer/berliner-adressbuecher/

There is a Max Ramensky in 1922, and he's an electrician.

The surname Ramensky seems to be of Russian origin (see e.g.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ramensky_family_hoax  ), in Austria-Hungary it's Ramenszky

Could Walter have been of a different nationality than German, from one of the former kingdoms e.g., and he had no country to go home to so he settled in Germany?

 

Edited by JWK
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4 hours ago, knittinganddeath said:

In case it's relevant, Norway only took in German POWs who had been held in Russia.

It is relevant to the ICRC files, as they do not contain German PoWs who were captured on the eastern front.

Charlie

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24 minutes ago, JWK said:

Could Walter have been of a different nationality than German, from one of the former kingdoms e.g., and he had no country to go home to so he settled in Germany?

That's a good idea, and it would explain why he can't be found in the German Verlustlisten... although it is somewhat complicated by the fact that all POWs left Norway by the summer of 1918, so if he had been Austro-Hungarian he would have returned to the empire before the formation of the new countries.

The newspaper article strongly suggests there was not much contact, if any, between Walter and Ragna (the mother of his child) so my other thought was that she didn't actually know where he came from in Germany and just said Berlin in order to save face. Or maybe his regiment was garrisoned there.

Thank you for checking the address directories (and also for the link, very useful for other research)!

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21 minutes ago, charlie2 said:

It is relevant to the ICRC files, as they do not contain German PoWs who were captured on the eastern front.

Well, this is embarrassing and somehow totally par for the course...that's an afternoon of my life that I won't get back. Thanks for the explanation ;-)

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12 hours ago, knittinganddeath said:

Thanks for the explanation ;-)

Sorry to have been the bearer of bad news! As far as I am aware (others may know better) German PoWs from the Russian front were registered with the Danish RC in Kopenhagen. I have been unable to ascertain if they still hold any records regarding individuals. 
It probably won’t help you in your quest but you may find this dissertation of interest.

https://publikationen.uni-tuebingen.de/xmlui/bitstream/handle/10900/46156/pdf/diss_wurzer.pdf?sequence=1

Charlie

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8 hours ago, charlie2 said:

Thank you -- even if it won't necessarily help find this POW, I think it will help me to establish what kinds of expectations one can have when researching the men held in Russia.

 

8 hours ago, JWK said:

No luck in the Austria-Hungary Verlustlisten either

 

Thank you for checking!

 

Anyway, I may have a candidate for the mystery man. I went back to the baptismal record and thought that the surname actually looked a bit like Rominski. Luckily it's not too common -- just 68 entries in Verlustlisten, so it was actually feasible to check all of them. Bolislaus Rominski, Unteroffizier from Bromberg, was at Løken. He served with the Garde-Grenadier Regiment Nr. 1 whose peacetime garrison was Berlin; by September 1918 he was back in Berlin, having been exchanged.

But why would he be called Walter? Does the name mutate from Boleslaus-->Boleslav-->Vojislav-->Walter?

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A Boleslav Rominski was back in Bromberg/Bydgoszcz in 1922, profession stolarz (carpenter)

rominski.jpg.d44b387e2550b6ac4ea6228006ebf1c1.jpg

 

https://genwiki.genealogy.net/Kategorie:Adressbuch_für_Bromberg

lubelska9.jpg.6cf5f93def096bc70cc20aedf92be2c0.jpg

But how you get from Boleslav to Walter? No idea. Maybe Ragan knew Boleslav and a Walter, and got the names mixed up?

 

Anyway: congratulations on finding him!

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The card confirms he was born in 1891! And the date of capture roughly matches when he was reported missing in the Verlustlisten (even if the location doesn't make sense).

I wonder if he was indeed the carpenter in Bromberg after the war. There was quite a little woodworking shop at Løken where they made all kinds of things for the hotel. After they went home, the hotel sold the tools that they left behind.

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Although only a "Gefr. oder Uffz.", he appears in the Regimentsgeschichte! He must have been very badly wounded in this incident to be able to come to Norway.

751270385_Screenshot2022-05-31at08_53_02.png.3067f1ba24f14b0bd0ea92327f52c9be.png

Edited by knittinganddeath
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Well, but the unit was nowhere near Flanders in september 1917...

And according to the internet, Boleslaus could be translated into Walter.

Jan

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8 hours ago, AOK4 said:

Boleslaus could be translated into Walter.

Thank you! I suspected as much but couldn't find anything to confirm.

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