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Remembered Today:

Captain Henry Jump : Royal Dragoons


John K
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I have asked for help once before from the GWF , and was overwhelmed by the advice and support so freely given .

I maintain ( cut the grass ! ) a graveyard in Crawley ( St Francis and St Anthony ) Sussex and am trying to compile brief biographies on some of its residents . During the summer i conduct tours around the graveyard and discuss some of the graves .

One of the graves is a large slab with a simple inscription :

Henry Jump

Captain Royal Dragoons

1882        1937

Using advice/tips i picked up on my previous request for advice here i have gleaned a little information on Henry from the National Archives , date of birth ( 02/11/1882 in Essex ) , commisioned 1906 , promoted to Captain in 1914 and that he was 5'11 1/2" tall !! . But otherwise i am drawing a blank . It seems strange to me that a career soldier , just promoted to Captain before the war began , seems to have so little background information recorded , or more likely that i am just looking in the wrong places . 

I would be very grateful if anyone has any information on the life and military career of Henry Jump  , or can give me pointers where to look myself . Where did he serve ,  medals , when did he leave the army etc .  As i say i have accessed the National Archive records for the Royal Dragoons ( Blues and Royals ) , but have only found sparse details on Henry's promotions etc . 

I have researched the background/lives of a number of military men buried at St Francis & St Anthony , but have largely drawn a blank with Captain Jump .

Thanks

John K      

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1 hour ago, John K said:

i am just looking in the wrong places

Quite possibly a bit of no and yes.

TNA only show the front of MIC [in b/w] - Ancestry and Fold3 show both sides [and in colour!].

The PoW lead came from the reverse.

image.png.ee39a4d1bbaca2cb53cca13672ce2227.png

Image courtesy of Fold3 [also accessible through Western Front Association membership]

Ancestry do have a free MIC viewing option if you sign up for it.

[However it has been so long ago since I signed up I have forotten how to do it!!! = But think this link will work https://www.ancestry.co.uk/account/create?rtype=1&fname=henry&lname=Jump&dbid=1262&pid=&flowId=dbid1262&returnurl=https%3a%2f%2fwww.ancestry.co.uk%2fsearch%2fcollections%2f1262%2f%3fname%3dhenry_Jump%26name_x%3ds_1%26count%3d20%26nreg%3d1 ]

M

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ICRC cards shows him as 1st Royal Dragoons, (and MiC just posted while I was typing:).

Long Long Trail adds:-

1st (Royal) Dragoons
August 1914 : at Potchefstroom in South Africa.
Recalled to England, arrived 19 September 1914.
Moved to Ludgershall and placed under command of 6th Cavalry Brigade in 3rd Cavalry Division.
8 October 1914 : landed at Ostende.
https://www.longlongtrail.co.uk/army/regiments-and-corps/cavalry-regiments/the-dragoons/

War Diary for the period can be found in the National Archive catalogue here https://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/C7351529

It can currently be downloaded for free, although you do need to sign in with your account. If you don't have one then even that can be set up as part of placing your first order. Just click on sign in and follow the instructions - no financial details are required.

Given the date of commissioning he is very likely to be the 28 year old Lieutenant "Harry"Jump, 1st Royal Dragoons, who was recorded in barrack at Muttra, India with the 1st Royal Dragoons on the night of the 2nd of April 1911 when the 1911 Census of England & Wales was taken. His birthplace is shown as Ongar, Essex. Overseas Army garrisons were also in scope for that Census.

Cheers,
Peter

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From 'History of the 6th Cavalry Brigade 1914-1918' by J. B. Bickersteth M.C.

IMG_20220427_175432.jpg

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From 'History of The Royal Dragoons 1661-1934' by C. T. Atkinson.

IMG_20220427_175201.jpg

IMG_20220427_175206.jpg

IMG_20220427_175300.jpg

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Thanks very much for the info , never knew he had become a POW in 1914 , this explains the lack of any details re service during the war .

As a POW I assume he was held in Germany , the info from Matlock refers to him as the “ o/c of interned officers in Switzerland “ would this have been at the end of the war when he was being repatriated ?

During my largely fruitless search to find details of Henry on the net I remember seeing a photo of the German Crown Prince and a Royal Dragoons officer posing in each other’s uniform ( I think in 1913 , in India ?

) . The British officer ( not Henry Jump ) is in a white Prussian Cuirasseier uniform . You would of thought that as the Royal Dragoons had links to the German royal family any POWs like Captain Jump would have received favourable treatment , it seems from the Extract of the 6th Brigade history posted by Andrew that he was roughed up by his German captors !! 
The records displayed by Andrew show Henry left the army in March 1921 , I wonder what happened to him after that , he died in 1937 at the relatively young age of 55 . Did he marry , have children ?

John K

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53 minutes ago, John K said:

the info from Matlock refers to him as the “ o/c of interned officers in Switzerland “

Not as the O/C - but it appears the info/nominal roll was forwarded by the O/C, c.1920

M

Edited by Matlock1418
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It would be interesting to learn more of the “so-called period of reprisals”, and of what it consisted in a little more detail, which presumably must have been recorded.  Also the Swiss internment and whether Jump married after the war.  The implication so-far is that he led a life of some solitude given his period as a captive, etc.

NB.  I wonder if in the photo of the Kaiser in Royal Dragoons uniform, the other fellow is King George V in Garde-Kürassier-Regiment uniform.  I seem to recall seeing that before (photos below refer).  There are quite a number of such paired portraits in uniforms of each other’s regiments reflecting the close familial relationship between Europe’s crowned head’s, partly as a result of Queen Victoria’s progeny intermarrying.  The Kaiser was a colonel in the 1st (Royal) Dragoons and the Czar was colonel in the 2nd (Royal Scots) Dragoons. 

499E84C6-73E6-4FF6-903A-527977424481.jpeg

9F4E8F76-AD5E-4E80-A306-D317BE5F32AE.jpeg

Edited by FROGSMILE
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Which explain the Swiss connection.

https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=yWPNDwAAQBAJ&pg=PT73&lpg=PT73&dq="henry+jump",+"dragoons"&source=bl&ots=opALO_V1iy&sig=ACfU3U2b8hj0_HWzWjLwjo6oRpS6v41RSA&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjz48zyybb3AhUlolwKHW4SDToQ6AF6BAgJEAM#v=onepage&q&f=false

Cut off the bottom. "your application for compensation inrespect of your wound of the 30th October 1914 cannot now be considered."

 

jump.JPG

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A quick run through his life – others with subscription access may well be able to flesh it out.

You’ve already given a date of birth of the 2nd November 1882.

The birth of Henry Jump, mothers’ maiden name Reynolds was registered with the civil authorities in the Ongar District of Essex in the October to November quarter, (Q4), of 1882.

There is a note on his FindaGrave website entry that his parents, James Jump and Annie Jump, nee Reynolds, were married in the Liverpool Roman Catholic Cathedral in 1880 – although no source is given for this. https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/211766450/henry-jump

On the 1891 Census of England & Wales the 8 year old Henry Jump, born Bobbingworth, Ongar, Essex, was recorded living at Blake Hall, West Greenstead Green, Bobbingworth, Ongar, Essex. This was the household of his parents James. (aged 36, Living on Own Means, born Liverpool), and Annie M., (aged 34, born Southport, Lancashire). As well as Henry their other children living with them are Annie M, (10, born Gateacre, Lancashire) and Maud M, (6), Roger J., (4), and Ralph L., (2) – all born Bobbingworth. The household runs to 8 Domestic Servants.

On the 1901 Census of England & Wales the 18 year old Henry Jump, born Ongar “Sussex”, was recorded as a Boarding Student at Stonyhurst College, Aighton, Clitheroe, Lancashire. This was a Roman Catholic Boarding School.

The Stonyhurst War Record unfortunately only gives him two very brief mentions – once as wounded, and once as a wounded prisoner of war. It may be worth contacting the school as they may have images of him in his school days – it’s likely he was a member of the OTC and probably sporty as well. http://www.worldwar1schoolarchives.org/stonyhurst-college/

There doesn’t appear to be a match for his parents on the 1901 Census of England & Wales. There are no obvious candidates in the civil death records for England & Wales in the period 1891-1901.

Since the previous census Henry may have gained at least three additional siblings – all registered in the Ongar District with mothers’ maiden name Reynolds.
Elaine Mary Jump, Q3 1891
Mary Jump Q4 1894
Annette Lucy Jump Q1 1898.

Looking for the siblings on the 1901 Census of England & Wales.
Annie M born c1881 Southport – no likely match.
Roger J born C1886 Bobbingworth – no likely match
Ralph L born c1888 Bobbingworth – the 12 year old Ralph, born Ongar, Essex, was recorded as a Boarding School Student at Beaumont College, St Johns, Priest Hill, Egham, Windsor. This was also a Roman Catholic boarding school judging from the teaching staff. The institutional return is noted that due to illness most of the students had left a few days prior to the date of the census. Wouldn’t want to read too much into it but that may imply that either Ralph was one of the ill students or that there was no home for him to return to.
Elaine Mary born Ongar District 1891 – the 9 year old Elaine, born Ongar is recorded as the oldest child in the household at Hardwick House, Hardwick, Thingoe, Essex. Also in the household are her sisters Mary, (6, born Ongar), Clare, (4, born Scotland) and Annette (3, born Ongar) – but their parents were absent on the night of the census. There are just the 9 domestic servants to run the household.

The death of a James Jump, aged 50, was recorded in the Thingoe District in Q3 1905. The 1905 Probate Calendar records that James Jump, of Horringer Court, Bury St Edmunds died on the 30th August 1905. Administration of his estate was granted at the London Court on the 17th October 1905 to John Sutherland Harmmod Banner, chartered accountant, Philip Colley, gentleman, and James Philip Reynolds, Cotton Merchant His estate was valued at £269,854 15s 8d – subsequently re-stated as £268,791-16-8. Even just allowing for inflation that would be the equivalent of about £23 million today.

An announcement in The Times of 20th October 1905 recorded that Mr James Jump, of Horringer-court, Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, formerly of Woodlands, Gateacre, Lancashire, who died on 30 August inst, left estate valued at £269,854 16s 8d gross, of which £261,543, 18s 8d is net personalty.

The following comes from a piece on his sister Mary.  After the death of James “the following year his wife Annie Mary purchased the Chantry Estate, Ipswich bringing her family of three sons and seven daughters to live there. Mary was a member of the Ipswich Fine Art Club 1919-1920 and exhibited from the Chantry in 1919, two watercolours 'At Murren, Switzerland' and 'River in Scotland' and also had on show a needlework picture. She married at Kensington, London in 1920, Francis [Frank] Newham Gilbey (19 December 1896-5 February 1973), son of Newham Gilbey, wine merchant” https://suffolkartists.co.uk/index.cgi?choice=painter&pid=1563

Possible references to Henry’s commissioning reflects that he had been serving in the Cambridge University Volunteer Rifle Corps. (Looks like @Allan1892 has now posted one of them while I was typing :)

1689879954_1907FMPnewspapersscreenshot.png.4046a84202347d83674263573f360ce0.png

Image courtesy FindMyPast.

Henry, (“Harry”)’s whereabouts at Muttra on the 1911 Census of England & Wales has already been detailed.

His family are again fairly elusive on the 1911 Census of England & Wales. He may have gained an additional sibling since the 1901 Census – a Decema Mary Jump, mothers’ maiden name Reynolds, was registered with the civil authorities in the Easthampstead district of Berkshire in Q1 1903.

This report on I suspect Henry’s capture may add a little bit more about the Lancashire origins of his family.

418181918_1915FMPnewspapersscreenshot.png.7856e8e777461d9412a7eb9a191a43c0.png

Image courtesy FindMyPast

A high level, (i.e. free) search of the 1921 Census of England & Wales – taken 4th June 1921, so after Henry stopped working in Switzerland, shows a Henry Jump, born c1883 Essex, England, as recorded at Sproughton, Burstall, in the Samford District of Suffolk. Other Jump’s recorded at Sproughton – but not necessarily in the same household, are:-

Annie M. Jump, born c1857, Southport, Lancashire. That would seem a good match for his mother.
Annette J. Jump, born c1897, Essex. A likely, barring the typo, match for his sister Annette Lucy.
Decuma M.Jump. born c1903, Bracknell, Berkshire, seemes a likely match for his Berkshire born sister Decema Mary.

The death of an Anne M. Jump, aged 68, was recorded in the Samford District in Q3 1926. The 1926 Probate Calendar records that Annie Mary Jump of The Chantry, Ipswich, died on the 9th July 1926. Probate was granted at the Ipswich court on the 13th September 1926 to Henry Jump, retired captain, H.M. Army, and Ralph Lyon Jump esquire.

The death of a Henry Jump, aged 54, was recorded in the Marylebone District of London in Q1 1937.  The 1937 Probate Calendar records that a Henry Jump, of Three Chimneys, Heytesbury, Wiltshire, died 9 January 1937 at 8-10 Beaumont-street, London, W1. Probate was granted at the Ipswich court on the 1st March 1937 to Ralph Lyon Jump, esquire, and Francis Newman Gilbey, company director. His estate was valued at £173,704 2s 6d. Allowing just for inflation that would now be about £825,000. (Francis was the husband of his sister Mary).

There are two marriages in the civil records from the late 1920’s for a Henry Jump, (no middle names), both in the West Derby District of Lancashire, but nothing as yet to suggest either relates to Captain Henry Jump. I don’t know if copies of civil wills cost as little as the pdf’s of soldiers wills, (believe those are about £1.50), but that would be likely to give a definative on whether he was married, and, if so, whether the marriage had produced children

There is a newspaper report from 1937 that might be worth exploring – its on FindMyPast and the British Newspaper Archive. It looks like the funeral took place at Crawley Monastery.

1773833355_1937FMPnewspapersscreenshot.png.bd59925efa4bb3ad912a1839d8779426.png

Image courtesy FindMyPast.

I suspect this is the Benedictines at Worth Abbey rather that the CofE Monastery at Crawley Down. However could start to provide a reason as to why he is buried where he is.

He gets a mention as the owner of this picture by Tissott which had passed to him via his father and and grandfather – who is described as a wealthy Justice of the Peace and Corn Merchant living at Gateacre, Lancashire. https://thehammocknovel.wordpress.com/2014/06/
It was sold after his death and is now at the Tate Galley, although not on display. https://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/tissot-portsmouth-dockyard-n05302

8 hours ago, John K said:

As a POW I assume he was held in Germany , the info from Matlock refers to him as the “ o/c of interned officers in Switzerland “ would this have been at the end of the war when he was being repatriated ?

We’ve had several references to Henry being captured severely wounded. It is likely he may well have needed long term medical care and certainly wouldn’t have been considered a combat effective. The tendency was to dump such prisoners on the Swiss, making them a burden on the Swiss medical system rather than the German one.

Hope some of that helps.

Peter

Edited by PRC
1)Typo's 2) More typos
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2 hours ago, busterfield said:

Which explain the Swiss connection.

https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=yWPNDwAAQBAJ&pg=PT73&lpg=PT73&dq="henry+jump",+"dragoons"&source=bl&ots=opALO_V1iy&sig=ACfU3U2b8hj0_HWzWjLwjo6oRpS6v41RSA&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjz48zyybb3AhUlolwKHW4SDToQ6AF6BAgJEAM#v=onepage&q&f=false

Cut off the bottom. "your application for compensation inrespect of your wound of the 30th October 1914 cannot now be considered."

 

jump.JPG

Very interesting Busterfield, thank you, how typically bureaucratic (and British) that his service for his country with one institution should have impeded him benefiting from his service (in wartime) with another.  That said he seems to have inherited well, so perhaps it did not affect him as detrimentally as it would have done for others less fortunate.

NB.  It seems to me likely that he laid the ground for his usefulness in “Eastern matters” during his presumably lengthy service prewar in India.  It’s difficult to see what other explanation there might be.

Edited by FROGSMILE
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1 hour ago, PRC said:

A quick run through his life – others with subscription access may well be able to flesh it out.

You’ve already given a date of birth of the 2nd November 1882.

The birth of Henry Jump, mothers’ maiden name Reynolds was registered with the civil authorities in the Ongar District of Essex in the October to November quarter, (Q4), of 1882.

There is a note on his FindaGrave website entry that his parents, James Jump and Annie Jump, nee Reynolds, were married in the Liverpool Roman Catholic Cathedral in 1880 – although no source is given for this. https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/211766450/henry-jump

On the 1891 Census of England & Wales the 8 year old Henry Jump, born Bobbingworth, Ongar, Essex, was recorded living at Blake Hall, West Greenstead Green, Bobbingworth, Ongar, Essex. This was the household of his parents James. (aged 36, Living on Own Means, born Liverpool), and Annie M., (aged 34, born Southport, Lancashire). As well as Henry their other children living with them are Annie M, (10, born Gateacre, Lancashire) and Maud M, (6), Roger J., (4), and Ralph L., (2) – all born Bobbingworth. The household runs to 8 Domestic Servants.

On the 1901 Census of England & Wales the 18 year old Henry Jump, born Ongar “Sussex”, was recorded as a Boarding Student at Stonyhurst College, Aighton, Clitheroe, Lancashire. This was a Roman Catholic Boarding School.

The Stonyhurst War Record unfortunately only gives him two very brief mentions – once as wounded, and once as a wounded prisoner of war. It may be worth contacting the school as they may have images of him in his school days – it’s likely he was a member of the OTC and probably sporty as well. http://www.worldwar1schoolarchives.org/stonyhurst-college/

There doesn’t appear to be a match for his parents on the 1901 Census of England & Wales. There are no obvious candidates in the civil death records for England & Wales in the period 1891-1901.

Since the previous census Henry may have gained at least three additional siblings – all registered in the Ongar District with mothers’ maiden name Reynolds.
Elaine Mary Jump, Q3 1891
Mary Jump Q4 1894
Annette Lucy Jump Q1 1898.

Looking for the siblings on the 1901 Census of England & Wales.
Annie M born c1881 Southport – no likely match.
Roger J born C1886 Bobbingworth – no likely match
Ralph L born c1888 Bobbingworth – the 12 year old Ralph, born Ongar, Essex, was recorded as a Boarding School Student at Beaumont College, St Johns, Priest Hill, Egham, Windsor. This was also a Roman Catholic boarding school judging from the teaching staff. The institutional return is noted that due to illness most of the students had left a few days prior to the date of the census. Wouldn’t want to read too much into it but that may imply that either Ralph was one of the ill students or that there was no home for him to return to.
Elaine Mary born Ongar District 1891 – the 9 year old Elaine, born Ongar is recorded as the oldest child in the household at Hardwick House, Hardwick, Thingoe, Essex. Also in the household are her sisters Mary, (6, born Ongar), Clare, (4, born Scotland) and Annette (3, born Ongar) – but their parents were absent on the night of the census. There are just the 9 domestic servants to run the household.

The death of a James Jump, aged 50, was recorded in the Thingoe District in Q3 1905. The 1905 Probate Calendar records that James Jump, of Horringer Court, Bury St Ednunds died on the 30th August 1905. Administration of his estate was granted at the London Court on the 17th October 1905 to John Sutherland Harmmod Banner, chartered accountant, Philip Colley, gentleman, and James Philip Reynolds, Cotton Merchant His estate was valued at £269,854 15s 8d – subsequently re-stated as £268,791-16-8. Even just allowing for inflation that would be the equivalent of about £23 million today.

An announcement in The Times of 20th October 1905 recorded that Mr James Jump, of Horringer-court, Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, formerly of Woodlands, Gateacre, Lancashire, who died on 30 August inst, left estate valued at £269,854 16s 8d gross, of which £261,543, 18s 8d is net personalty.

The following comes from a piece on his sister Mary.  After the death of James “the following year his wife Annie Mary purchased the Chantry Estate, Ipswich bringing her family of three sons and seven daughters to live there. Mary was a member of the Ipswich Fine Art Club 1919-1920 and exhibited from the Chantry in 1919, two watercolours 'At Murren, Switzerland' and 'River in Scotland' and also had on show a needlework picture. She married at Kensington, London in 1920, Francis [Frank] Newham Gilbey (19 December 1896-5 February 1973), son of Newham Gilbey, wine merchant” https://suffolkartists.co.uk/index.cgi?choice=painter&pid=1563

Possible references to Henry’s commissioning reflects that he had been serving in the Cambridge University Volunteer Rifle Corps. (Looks like @Allan1892 has now posted one of them while I was typing :)

Image courtesy FindMyPast.

Henry, (“Harry”)’s whereabouts at Muttra on the 1911 Census of England & Wales has already been detailed.

His family are again fairly elusive on the 1911 Census of England & Wales. He may have gained an additional sibling since the 1901 Census – a Decema Mary Jump, mothers’ maiden name Reynolds, was registered with the civil authorities in the Easthampstead district of Berkshire in Q1 1903.

This report on I suspect Henry’s capture may add a little bit more about the Lancashire origins of his family.

Image courtesy FindMyPast

A high level, (i.e. free) search of the 1921 Census of England & Wales – taken 4th June 1921, so after Henry stopped working in Switzerland, shows a Henry Jump, born c1883 Essex, England, as recorded at Sproughton, Burstall, in the Samford District of Suffolk. Other Jump’s recorded at Sproughton – but not necessarily in the same household, are:-

Annie M. Jump, born c1857, Southport, Lancashire. That would seem a good match for his mother.
Annette J. Jump, born c1897, Essex. A likely, barring the typo, match for his sister Annette Lucy.
Decuma M.Jump. born c1903, Bracknell, Berkshire, seemes a likely match for his Berkshire born sister Decema Mary.

The death of an Anne M. Jump, aged 68, was recorded in the Samford District in Q3 1926. The 1926 Probate Calndar records that Annie Mary Jump of The Chantry, Ipswich, died on the 9th July 1926. Probate was granted at the Ipswich court on the 13th September 1926 to Henry Jump, retired captain, H.M. Army, and Ralph Lyon Jump esquire.

The death of a Henry Jump, aged 54, was recorded in the Marylebone District of London in Q1 1937.  The 1937 Probate Calendar records that a Henry Jump, of Three Chimneys, Heytesbury, Wiltshire, died 9 January 1937 at 8-10 Beaumont-street, London, W1. Probate was granted at the Ipswich court on the 1st March 1937 to Ralph Lyon Jump, esquire, and Francis Newman Gilbey, company director. His estate was valued at £173,704 2s 6d. Allowing just for inflation that would now be about £825,000. (Francis was the husband of his sister Mary).

There are two marriages in the civil records from the late 1920’s for a Henry Jump, (no middle names), both in the West Derby District of Lancashire, but nothing as yet to suggest either relates to Captain Henry Jump. I don’t know if copies of civil wills cost as little as the pdf’s of soldiers wills, (believe those are about £1.50), but that would be likely to give a definative on whether he was married, and, if so, whether the marriage had produced children

There is a newspaper report from 1937 that might be worth exploring – its on FindMyPast and the British Newspaper Archive. It looks like the funeral took place at Crawley Monastery.

Image courtesy FindMyPast.

I suspect this is the Benedictines at Worth Abbey rather that the CofE Monastery at Crawley Down. However could start to provide a reason as to why he is buried where he is.

He gets a mention as the owner of this picture by Tissott which had passed to him via his father and and grandfather – who is described as a wealthy Justice of the Peace and Corn Merchant living at Gateacre, Lancashire. https://thehammocknovel.wordpress.com/2014/06/
It was sold after his death and is now at the Tate Galley, although not on display. https://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/tissot-portsmouth-dockyard-n05302

We’ve had several references to Henry being captured severly wounded. It is likely he may well have needed long term medical care and certainly wouldn’t have been considered a combat effective. The tendency was to dump such prisoners on the Swiss, making them a burden on the Swiss medical system rather than the German one.

Hope some of that helps.

Peter

Thank you Peter, fascinating stuff all told and I was intrigued that after a lengthy period in Suffolk he ended up seemingly rather suddenly at Heytesbury in Wiltshire (see enclosed images of Three Chimneys - Heytesbury).  
It’s made me curious as to whether he might’ve been a Friend of Dorothy, because Siegfried Sassoon also lived in that village and his residence, Heytesbury House, became a regular meeting place at weekends for visitors of that persuasion, including one of his great loves, Stephen Tennant (plus many others).  Of course it might be nothing more than a coincidence, but ostensibly seems an odd move. 

E944921E-95A1-4CD4-9F33-9BA81DF610B2.jpeg

7E6D6ED4-D239-42BF-B52E-EEF03DB51F1D.jpeg

9EA1A378-5B31-45F4-8003-0CA185AE9A66.jpeg

Edited by FROGSMILE
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There is always one more search :)

The Suffolk Artists website entry for mother Annie Mary adds - "Her husband died at at Horringer Court, Bury St Edmund's on 30 August 1905, aged 50 and the following year Annie purchased the Chantry Estate, Sproughton, Ipswich which had been empty since 1902 and, after extensive repairs and with the gardens completely landscaped, in 1906 she moved in with her children and where she employed a staff on 15 indoor servants and 12 outdoors. A member of the Ipswich Fine Art Club from 1912 until her death and exhibited from the Chantry in 1919 two watercolours, 'Lake in Chantry Park' and illuminated pages from a 'Book of Hours'. Annie Mary Jump died at The Chantry, Ipswich on 9 July 1926. All of her daughters married but her three sons remained bachelors, sons Henry and Ralph Lyon, sold the mansion by auction in 1927 for £15,000, when it was purchased for development into a housing estate, but the following year Sir Arthur Charles Churchman purchased the Chantry and most of the estate as a gift to the town of Ipswich." https://suffolkartists.co.uk/index.cgi?choice=painter&pid=1562
(My highlights to tie in with the 1921 census and that Henry did not marry).

865092389_ChantryHouseSproughtonIpswichsourcedWikipedia.jpg.380b1cf16d6ad210a70c9ba28d68888a.jpg

Chantry House from 2019 - it is now used as a Sue Ryder care centre. By Keith Evans, CC BY-SA 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=13870864

And checking FMP newspapers to see if there was any mention of what use The Chantry was put to in the Great War I came across references instead to the marriages of some of Henrys’ sister – in at least once case Henry gave his sister away at the altar.

Annie Mary Jump married Edwin Miller McFerran in 1905. By the time a child was born in 1912 he was referred to in the birth announcement as Captain E.M.G. McFerran. Edwin Miller Gilliand Miller started the war as Lieutenant Colonel, 4th Battalion Royal Irish Regiment. https://livesofthefirstworldwar.iwm.org.uk/lifestory/2791134

Maud Mary Jump married a Captain Montague Wace, 14th Sikhs in August 1914. See also https://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/trees/104223/I22599/-/individual

Elaine Mary Jump married a Henry P.J. Cowell on August 13th, 1914. His obituary references him as a Colonel. CWGC records that Major Henry Pulleine John Cowell, “A” Battery, 59th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery, would die on the 9th August 1915, aged 34. He is now remembered on the Helles Memorial. He is recorded as formerly Captain, “O” Battery, Royal Horse Artillery and had been Mentioned in Despatches. Additional information is that he was the Son of Maj. Gen. the Rt. Hon. Sir John Clayton Cowell, K.C.B., P.C., and Lady Cowell, of Clifton Castle, Bedale, Yorks; husband of Elaine Mary Cowell, of 22, Alexander Square, London, S.W.1, and The Chantry, Ipswich. Served in the South African War. https://www.cwgc.org/find-records/find-war-dead/casualty-details/680925/henry-pulleine-john-cowell/

A family member remembers her great aunt, the widow Mrs Cowell here https://www.pressreader.com/uk/kent-messenger-maidstone/20160115/282926679392156

The circumstances of his wounding and subsequent death were previously covered on the forum in this thread.

Cheers,
Peter

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1 hour ago, PRC said:

There is always one more search :)

The Suffolk Artists website entry for mother Annie Mary adds - "Her husband died at at Horringer Court, Bury St Edmund's on 30 August 1905, aged 50 and the following year Annie purchased the Chantry Estate, Sproughton, Ipswich which had been empty since 1902 and, after extensive repairs and with the gardens completely landscaped, in 1906 she moved in with her children and where she employed a staff on 15 indoor servants and 12 outdoors. A member of the Ipswich Fine Art Club from 1912 until her death and exhibited from the Chantry in 1919 two watercolours, 'Lake in Chantry Park' and illuminated pages from a 'Book of Hours'. Annie Mary Jump died at The Chantry, Ipswich on 9 July 1926. All of her daughters married but her three sons remained bachelors, sons Henry and Ralph Lyon, sold the mansion by auction in 1927 for £15,000, when it was purchased for development into a housing estate, but the following year Sir Arthur Charles Churchman purchased the Chantry and most of the estate as a gift to the town of Ipswich." https://suffolkartists.co.uk/index.cgi?choice=painter&pid=1562
(My highlights to tie in with the 1921 census and that Henry did not marry).

865092389_ChantryHouseSproughtonIpswichsourcedWikipedia.jpg.380b1cf16d6ad210a70c9ba28d68888a.jpg

Chantry House from 2019 - it is now used as a Sue Ryder care centre. By Keith Evans, CC BY-SA 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=13870864

And checking FMP newspapers to see if there was any mention of what use The Chantry was put to in the Great War I came across references instead to the marriages of some of Henrys’ sister – in at least once case Henry gave his sister away at the altar.

Annie Mary Jump married Edwin Miller McFerran in 1905. By the time a child was born in 1912 he was referred to in the birth announcement as Captain E.M.G. McFerran. Edwin Miller Gilliand Miller started the war as Lieutenant Colonel, 4th Battalion Royal Irish Regiment. https://livesofthefirstworldwar.iwm.org.uk/lifestory/2791134

Maud Mary Jump married a Captain Montague Wace, 14th Sikhs in August 1914. See also https://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/trees/104223/I22599/-/individual

Elaine Mary Jump married a Henry P.J. Cowell on August 13th, 1914. His obituary references him as a Colonel. CWGC records that Major Henry Pulleine John Cowell, “A” Battery, 59th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery, would die on the 9th August 1915, aged 34. He is now remembered on the Helles Memorial. He is recorded as formerly Captain, “O” Battery, Royal Horse Artillery and had been Mentioned in Despatches. Additional information is that he was the Son of Maj. Gen. the Rt. Hon. Sir John Clayton Cowell, K.C.B., P.C., and Lady Cowell, of Clifton Castle, Bedale, Yorks; husband of Elaine Mary Cowell, of 22, Alexander Square, London, S.W.1, and The Chantry, Ipswich. Served in the South African War. https://www.cwgc.org/find-records/find-war-dead/casualty-details/680925/henry-pulleine-john-cowell/

A family member remembers her great aunt, the widow Mrs Cowell here https://www.pressreader.com/uk/kent-messenger-maidstone/20160115/282926679392156

The circumstances of his wounding and subsequent death were previously covered on the forum in this thread.

Cheers,
Peter

Thank you Peter, all this is certainly bringing the OPs solitary headstone to life.  Odd that all three brothers did not marry.  More to learn about the details of his treatment by the Germans it seems. 

NB.  The Three Chimney’s residence at Heytesbury must have seemed very modest after living at Chantry and puts into perspective his fruitless attempts to gain financial recompense for his wounds, given that the value of the Chantry estate was divided amongst his siblings.

Edited by FROGSMILE
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Once again thank you very much for all the information on Henry Jump . When i sent the original post all i knew was his birthday , year of death and military ranks . Now i have a much better picture of the man , so much information . Thanks Frogsmile , Busterfield , Matlock , PRC , Andrew and Allan . I am conscious of not abusing the knowledge of all the people on this site , and in most cases do my own ( limited research ) , but Henry Jump and my previous enquiry on Ian Gunnis had run out of steam and i am so grateful for your help .

I shall be sending a small donation to the GWF in Wells .

Here is a  photo of Henry Jumps grave in Crawley , as you can see quite stark , but he was obviously proud of being in the Royal Dragoons as this is the only inscription apart from his name and dates of birth and death .

The Catholic church of St Francis and St Anthony in Crawley has a large and interesting Graveyard attached . Between 1860 and 1980 it was a Franciscan Friary and Seminary ( it is now a parish church run by Augustinians )  , and a number of well known people were buried there  , quite unusual for what in those days was a small village in Sussex , now a huge new town .

Regards

John K

 

 

      

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