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Remembered Today:

Pte Samuel Dearsley 22315 1st Garrison Btn Essex Rgt


adrian 1008
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I think this is a small project.........

The above is not recorded on a local war memorial, and I am making the case for him to be added.

Samuel Dearsley was born in Stradishall Suffolk in 1873. to parents William and Ann. On Dec 11th 1894 he joins the colours in Bury St Edmunds and is posted to 1st Btn. He served in india and Egypt, looking on FMP his record shows good conduct but in Nov 1907 he forfits pay for "physical Inefficiency" this is appealed and the pay is reinstated in March 1908.

He leaves the Army in 1913 having completed 18 yrs 49 days and is granted a pension, one of the forms states he has no medal entitlement, yet served 18 yrs + with the colours. He re enlists and is given No 22315 but ? due to age is posted to a Garrison Btn ?? Manchester area

He died on 23/06/1916 But I dont know why

Questions

1 Why no LSGC Medal

2 Would he qualify for BWM & VM

3 What did he die from

Your assistance as always appreciated

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35 minutes ago, adrian 1008 said:

3 What did he die from

Cause of death is given on his Pension Card .... (can't read it - no doubt other will be able)

Regards

Russ

 

Dearsley, Samuel (22315).jpg

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38 minutes ago, adrian 1008 said:

2 Would he qualify for BWM & VM

He qualified for the 1914/15 Star, BWM & VM - he is on both Medal Rolls

Regards

Russ

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Thank you I ve not seen that .... Carcinoma of stomach is cancer of the stomach

?? Comm on active service commenced on active service or comensurate with active service

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19 minutes ago, adrian 1008 said:

comensurate with active service

.... I think it means that (although I usually see attrib. i.e. attributable when that is the case)

By the way his Soldiers' Effects Record states he died in No 2 Western General Hospital, Manchester.

Russ

 

 

22315 SER.jpg

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another learning point,thank you I thought a Garrison Battalion meant staying at home made up of older experienced soldiers involved in training

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Garrison Battalions were made up of soldiers unfit for front line duty. This decision was made at time of enlistment or after previous front line service where the soldier had suffered wounds or sickness. They were sent to various parts of the empire on garrison duties to release fit soldiers for front line duty

From http://www.longlongtrail.co.uk/army/regiments-and-corps/the-british-infantry-regiments-of-1914-1918/essex-regiment/

Essex Regiment

1st Garrison Battalion
Formed at Denham, Buckinghamshire on 21 July 1915.
Left Devonport, arriving Mudros 3 September 1915. Served on Gallipoli before moving to Egypt in February 1916, where it then remained.

Maureen

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Thank you Maureen, I assume he served abroad until he became symptomatic when he was shipped home presumably arriving in Manchester where he was admitted

 

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Thank you all, yesterday I met with a member of the Church where the memorial cross is located, He has agreed that the name of Pte Samuel Dearsley will be added to the names of the fallen from WW1. It is hoped to have it added on 23rd June the anniversary of his passing.

A soldier who having served for 18 yrs went back to help his country

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On 19/04/2022 at 16:33, adrian 1008 said:

?? Comm on active service commenced on active service or comensurate with active service

From PIC above - transcribes as: Commg on A/S = Commencing on Active Service.  For me, Comm. always means commencing [I have never heard of it as commensurate]

Pension was paid after a fairly standard six months of continuation of standard Separation Allowances, during which the pension will have been calculated.

The DoB recorded is the widow's - as her pension could, then or later, be age-related/dependant [more if 35-44 and 45 & over]

The PIC is annotated N/N which is thought to mean 'Noted for Novel' [i.e. special treatment/calculation] however it only shows 18/6 pw = this was a standard 10/- for a widow under 35yo plus 5/- for first child plus 3/6 for second child.

M

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Thank you Matlock,  this a standard pension for his service after 1914, his previous pension for his service 1894/1913 would have died with him or would that be a separate widows pension

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30 minutes ago, adrian 1008 said:

this a standard pension for his service after 1914, his previous pension for his service 1894/1913 would have died with him or would that be a separate widows pension

The PIC, above, reflects his Dependant's/s' pension and allowances because of his wartime death - 10/- was the standard widow's rate pertaining to his rank as a Pte., The children's rates were flat rate.

I am not familiar with Service pensions - perhaps @ss002d6252 can address matters relating to any service pension that might have accrued. This mention should bring your enquiry to his attention.

Of course the N/N [Noted for Novel] could mean that further calculation was undertaken, but unfortunately the main MoP pension file will be long lost as they were deliberately destroyed after their use was ended.

M

Edited by Matlock1418
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19 minutes ago, Matlock1418 said:

I am not familiar with Service pensions - perhaps @ss002d6252 can address matters relating to any service pension that might have accrued. This mention should bring your enquiry to his attention.

Already looking.

43 minutes ago, adrian 1008 said:

Thank you Matlock,  this a standard pension for his service after 1914, his previous pension for his service 1894/1913 would have died with him or would that be a separate widows pension


In the 1917 RW a disabled man received a lower was pension where he was getting a service pension, so they were paid alongside.

In respect of widows, the RW 1917 is silent on service pensions. Parts of the 1914 Royal Pay Warrant were retained, but not Article 1245, which covered widow's pensions. I would say, at the moment, that the widow's pension under the RW would have entirely replaced the widow's pension paid on the death of a service pensioner (the MoP rate was higher anyway).

Craig

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