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Remembered Today:

Tracing a TA Artillery trooper


asdarley
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As far as I can ascertain this chap with bandolier and spurs is Royal Artillery probably RFA?  He wears an Imperial Service badge so is likely a Territorial.

On the reverse of the photo is written Leighton Buzzard but it is thought that his home town was Bradford. Also faintly discernable is RA 7 .  His name was Richard Hudson but not I believe KIA.

Any info on the likelihood of a TA artillery unit in Bradford would be welcome.

I apologise for the photo as I can't remember or work out how to orientate it!

 

Bryden soldier2.jpg

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quote -  I can't remember or work out how to orientate it! That's just about within my technological capabilities - but only just ;)

825323816_Brydensoldier2.jpg.8fd17c809b7455f6955f44a3cbaed7e5.jpg.10c52364d533efbd1dfe38523acf0e04.jpg

Edited by michaeldr
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I concur with your observations but please do post an image of the reverse. The likely unit for a Bradford TF RFA man would be 2nd Bde West Riding RFA TF which I believe was renumbered as 246th Bde RFA during 1916, I cannot see any obvious MIC's for him at present but will have a better look later.

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45 minutes ago, asdarley said:

As far as I can ascertain this chap with bandolier and spurs is Royal Artillery probably RFA?  He wears an Imperial Service badge so is likely a Territorial.

On the reverse of the photo is written Leighton Buzzard but it is thought that his home town was Bradford. Also faintly discernable is RA 7 .  His name was Richard Hudson but not I believe KIA.

Amongst the pension cards at the WFA/Fold3 are two for John Richard HUDSON, 7th Res Battery, Royal Field Artillery, 7/19669, 9669 - Discharged 23/3/16

He claimed for a disability [not specified] and gave his address as: Daw Green Avenue, Crigglestone, Wakefield and 4 Chancery Lane, Wakefield = so not a millinon miles from Bradford

Edit: he has a MIC, as L/19669 - for just a SWB I reckon.

Edited by Matlock1418
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9 minutes ago, Matlock1418 said:

Amongst the pension cards at the WFA/Fold3 is one for John Richard HUDSON, 7th Res Battery, Royal Field Artillery, 7/19669, 9669 - Discharged 23/3/16

He claimed for a disability [not specified] and gave his address as: Daw Green Avenue, Crigglestone, Wakefield and 4 Chancery Lane, Wakefield = so not a millinon miles from Bradford

Awarded SWB No. 476890, discharged due to wounds or sickness (KR 392 XVI) Enlisted 23rd April 1915 and no overseas service noted.

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Just now, jay dubaya said:

Awarded SWB No. 476890, discharged due to wounds or sickness (KR 392 XVI) Enlisted 23rd April 1915 and no overseas service noted.

You posted just as I edited - good to get the confirmation of no O/S

M

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FWIW I’m not sure an Imperial Service badge fits with this man

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33 minutes ago, jay dubaya said:

FWIW I’m not sure an Imperial Service badge fits with this man

That's alright - As the only Richard HUDSON, RFA, that I could see with pension cards I just put him up for consideration [though those addresses may be perhaps be attractive :-/].

Looking further for MIC for Richard HUDSON, RFA (TF) and I've turned up :

3092 / 687369 = BWM & VM

3268 / 960956 = BWM & VM

2801 / 771047 = BWM & VM

Those with more access than me may be able to check these chaps out.

??? 

M

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2801 / 771047 May be a good candidate as the 6 digit number was part of the block allocated to the 245th Bde RFA (previously 1st West Riding Bde RFA TF)

My bad... the number was allocated to 63rd DAC

Edited by jay dubaya
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Thanks to you all for your help.  Especially orientating the photo!  The chap in question is my daughter in laws great grandfather. A previously unknown photo that has come to light as she sorted her mothers effects out.  Am awaiting copy of the reverse side of the photo.   As is often the case as the generations pass the information is lost with them. And how many digital images will be around in a 100 years time?

A further question .. do the lanyard and swagger stick denote a particular role? 

Edited by asdarley
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55 minutes ago, asdarley said:

Thanks to you all for your help.  Especially orientating the photo!  The chap in question is my daughter in laws great grandfather. A previously unknown photo that has come to light as she sorted her mothers effects out.  Am awaiting copy of the reverse side of the photo.   As is often the case as the generations pass the information is lost with them. And how many digital images will be around in a 100 years time?

A further question .. do the lanyard and swagger stick denote a particular role? 

The swagger stick is actually a whip (riding) as carried by men of the mounted duties corps in place of a stick/cane.  It was a requirement for soldiers to carry these when ‘walking-out’ from barracks (which like leave was a privilege and not a right).  It was intended to keep the soldiers hands busy, give him a certain air, and inculcate pride in his personal appearance (smartness).  The lanyard was attached to the army issue clasp knife which soldiers often shortened via plaiting.  A number of mounted corps encouraged its whitening to brighten up the drab uniform, but it was not regulated to be mandatory until after the war in the early 1920s.  The spurs together with whip suggests duty as a driver but actually all gunners of the mounted duty corps, RHA and RFA were required to dress in that manner outside barracks.

Edited by FROGSMILE
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Thanks FROGSMILE facts to file away there!

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13 minutes ago, asdarley said:

Thanks FROGSMILE facts to file away there!

It was all associated with a sub conscious desire for quasi officer appearance.  In the soldier’s mind was the fact that many officers rode horses and wore spurs, so the gunner saw himself as superior to the footslogger in the infantry, and loved to jingle his spurs as he walked the town with his whip in hand, hoping to attract the eye of a pretty local girl.  

Edited by FROGSMILE
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