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Remembered Today:

'Flying Old Boots' - Imperial German Air Service


Gunner 87
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Hello. Have any of our members heard of the phrase 'Flying Old Boots' in reference to the Imperial German Air Service. it was possibly used by Woodrow Wilson in a speech though I cannot find any trace of this. The attached 'Trench Art' lighter was sold with this information... many thanks in advance Gunner 87

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Edited by Gunner 87
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Hi,

all the Germans who acquired a flying license prior to the outbreak of WW1 were called "Alte Adler", but only since 1927, as far as I know. Maybe this is similar to what W. Wilson meant with his expression.

GreyC

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26 minutes ago, GreyC said:

Hi,

all the Germans who acquired a flying license prior to the outbreak of WW1 were called "Alte Adler", but only since 1927, as far as I know. Maybe this is similar to what W. Wilson meant with his expression.

GreyC

Thank you GreyC. That's appreciated.

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  • Gunner 87 changed the title to 'Flying Old Boots' - Imperial German Air Service

Wilson died in 1924 in case that's relevant. Sorry that I can't help further. I did run a newspaper search (https://hwk1.hebis.de/) and "alte Stiefel" turned up only literal hits (used clothing collection, etc.) although of course that doesn't mean that the expression wasn't ever used in relation to pilots.

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Posted (edited)
11 minutes ago, knittinganddeath said:

Wilson died in 1924 in case that's relevant. Sorry that I can't help further. I did run a newspaper search (https://hwk1.hebis.de/) and "alte Stiefel" turned up only literal hits (used clothing collection, etc.) although of course that doesn't mean that the expression wasn't ever used in relation to pilots.

 

15 hours ago, GreyC said:

Hi,

all the Germans who acquired a flying license prior to the outbreak of WW1 were called "Alte Adler", but only since 1927, as far as I know. Maybe this is similar to what W. Wilson meant with his expression.

GreyC

Thank you both for your help and suggestions. It has been suggested that it could be word play at the expense of the Germans as the lighters were French made. The word 'Staffel' could be replaced by 'Stiefel' thus mocking the German Air Service. 

Edited by Gunner 87
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