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Background reading on Irish Command


ddycher
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Crozier dropped the Black and Tans like a hot brick when he saw that they were thugs, murderers and villains, not soldiers. He went off to command the newly liberated Lithuanian army after.

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7 minutes ago, KGB said:

Crozier dropped the Black and Tans like a hot brick when he saw that they were thugs, murderers and villains, not soldiers. He went off to command the newly liberated Lithuanian army after.

 

I should warn forum readers that this is "false news"

1. Crozier was in Lithuania BEFORE he went to Ireland

2. He had nothing to do with the Black and Tans, he was in command of the ADRIC. A cursory reading of the background will tell you the difference

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On the theme of unreliable memoirs I'd recommend Robert Raymond Money's 'Flying and Soldiering'. He was shot down and taken POW when flying with the RFC in WWI.

He doesn't obtain a commission with the RAF and returns to the army, serving with the East Yorkshire Regiment. His time in Ireland is basically as a despatch rider/intelligence officer, though he talks up the latter role considerably. His Battalion trundles around in two slow, noisy, unreliable Peerless armoured cars, perhaps a scarecrow effect in announcing their presence. He drove an old Douglas motorcycle around Mullingar and its environs, well away from the Munster hotspots. He then gets the Brigade Intelligence Officer appointment, and is based in Athlone. 

Irish Command is very much in the background, though at one point he suggests to his Brigadier that it's as likely than not that the reports he and Gardiner (the other Intelligence Officer) were filing for typing were being furnished to both Fifth Divisional HQ (at the Curragh) and IRA HQ. He enjoys the use of a Triumph motorcycle with sidecar but much of his memoir is concerned with visits to local RIC personnel but one notable incident was the death of General Lambert.

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On 10/08/2022 at 17:30, corisande said:

 

I should warn forum readers that this is "false news"

1. Crozier was in Lithuania BEFORE he went to Ireland

2. He had nothing to do with the Black and Tans, he was in command of the ADRIC. A cursory reading of the background will tell you the difference

Did Lithuania exist in 1919? As to the Auxies, they were as bad as the Tans if not worse.

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19 hours ago, Airshipped said:

On the theme of unreliable memoirs I'd recommend Robert Raymond Money's 'Flying and Soldiering'. He was shot down and taken POW when flying with the RFC in WWI.

He doesn't obtain a commission with the RAF and returns to the army, serving with the East Yorkshire Regiment. His time in Ireland is basically as a despatch rider/intelligence officer, though he talks up the latter role considerably. His Battalion trundles around in two slow, noisy, unreliable Peerless armoured cars, perhaps a scarecrow effect in announcing their presence. He drove an old Douglas motorcycle around Mullingar and its environs, well away from the Munster hotspots. He then gets the Brigade Intelligence Officer appointment, and is based in Athlone. 

Irish Command is very much in the background, though at one point he suggests to his Brigadier that it's as likely than not that the reports he and Gardiner (the other Intelligence Officer) were filing for typing were being furnished to both Fifth Divisional HQ (at the Curragh) and IRA HQ. He enjoys the use of a Triumph motorcycle with sidecar but much of his memoir is concerned with visits to local RIC personnel but one notable incident was the death of General Lambert.

Off the top of my head, who wrote "The men I killed" ? Must look it up now. 

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20 hours ago, KGB said:

Off the top of my head, who wrote "The men I killed" ? Must look it up now. 

Brigadier General Frank Crozier.

Edited by FROGSMILE
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20 hours ago, FROGSMILE said:

Brigadier General Frank Crozier.

I recalled it a few mins after, senility. 

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