Jump to content
The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

19th officer cadet I’d love if any one recognised any names


arantxa
 Share

Recommended Posts

Blimey how do you get all that info and you present it so well.  It’s super !!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 hours ago, arantxa said:

Blimey how do you get all that info and you present it so well.  It’s super !!!

All the work of the Leeds Pals Volunteer Researchers, so kudo's to them.

McDonald.jpg.1f9b8d9cc8c325d87684b78e7fe28497.jpg

I originally guessed C. McDonald.

13 hours ago, esco said:

C. McDonald  - A. G. Donald ( Abercromby Gordon Donald ) H.L.I.  https://www.thegazette.co.uk/London/issue/30187/supplement/7201/data.pdf

Abercromby Gordon Donald  - Cadet gazetted Second Lieutenant in the supplement dated 17th July 1917, Page 7201 Highland Light Infantry.

I may be fooling myself but I think I can see the A and the G in the signature now :)

No obvious MiC in the National Archive catalogue.

The October 1917 Army List records him on the establishment of the Regular Army Battalions of the Highland Light Infantry as a Second Lieutenant with seniority from the 27th June 1917. https://digital.nls.uk/british-military-lists/archive/106332184

By the time of the November 1918 Army List he no longer appears in the index.

No likely match on CWGC. No additional entry in the London Gazette to show that he had resigned his commission, or had been dismissed from the service.

I took another look on Ancestry and I believe I’ve found him. The MiC shows him as commissioned 27th June 1917 prior to which he had been Lance Corporal 2276 then 6776, Scottish Horse. He went on to be a Lieutenant in the Royal Flying Corps and transferring to the Royal Air Force when it came into being on April 1918.

313725296_AbercrombyGordonDonaldMiCsourcedAncestry.jpg.319af6488a6163b17ad2706009e368aa.jpg

Image courtesy Ancestry

The National Archive have Great War era RAF records for him. The catalogue entry shows his date of birth as the 22nd December 1893.

The record itself shows him as Highland Light Infantry attached RAF.

His permanent address was 75 Abergeldie Road, Aberdeen, and his next of kin was mother, Mrs. M.L. Donald of the same address. Prior to enlisting he had been a Veterinary Student at Aberdeen from August 1913 to August 1914.

He joined the R.F.C.from the Highland Light Infantry at Reading on the 20th August 1917, having passed a medical on the 13th . From there he was posted to C.F.F.(?) on the 25th September 1917.

On the 19th November 1917 he was posted to 94 Squadron.

On the 1917 Census he was serving with 94 Squadron. It is noted that since joing the R.F.C. he had flown Caudron, Avro and Sopwith Scout.

As some point early in 1918 it looks like he is posted to 2 S. of T.G. but the handwriting is far from clear.

On the 13th March 1918 he was appointed Flying Officer. He was promoted Lieutenant effective 1st April 1918.

On the 25th June 1918 he was posted to 64 Squadron. There is a note beside it saying S.E.5 – so possibly the type of aircraft being flown.

By the 13th July 1919 he was at 92 Squadron (AR), again noted S.E. 5 and a “Lt. Fly. A.”. There is then a confusing few enries relating to units including 70 Squadon  and possibly “H. Est”, over the next few weeks.

He was transferred to the unemployed list on the 17th August 1919. https://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/D8254879

94 Squadron.

The squadron was formed at Harling Road on 1 August 1917 as a training unit for the Sopwith Camel. Mobilised in May 1918, the Squadron moved to France at the end of October with S.E.5A's https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/No._94_Squadron_RAF

64 Squadron.

.. move to France on 14 October 1917.

The DH.5s were replaced by SE.5As in March 1918 and conducted both fighter and ground-attack operations for the remainder of the First World War. It returned to Narborough in February 1919, where it was disbanded on 31 December 1919. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/No._64_Squadron_RAF

A Pilot Office Abercromby Gordon Donald, born 22nd December 1893, was captured by the Japanese in 1942. There are various sources, and he was either attached to the RAF Headquarters, Singapore or serving with the Navigation Flight. He was either captured at Singapore, or more likely Java, (where most of the RAF was evacuated too when the Japanese rapidly achieved total control of the air over the Malaya and Singapore).

9650449_AbercombieGordonDonaldJapanesePoWcardsourcedFMP.jpg.759ba1a4d27eaf2d99846e51f14bf833.jpg

Image courtesy of FindMyPast

1696881678_DONALD_ABERCROMBIEGORDON_144363_20648.jpg.7fb5b4523e971ae07bb9b23539b0c6a1.jpg

https://gallery.its.unimelb.edu.au/imu/imu.php?request=multimedia&irn=46036

Cheers,
Peter

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thats really interesting.....its the signatures .....I was always told your signature should not be easy to copy...do you think thats why they are so hard to read

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, arantxa said:

I was always told your signature should not be easy to copy...do you think thats why they are so hard to read

It's good practice to make you signature hard to forge - but makes it hard for us a century later:)

This next one is a bit more straightforward.

Waite.jpg.0b0e799e559be9577b4f7586b4ecf984.jpg

C. Waite

The October 1917 Army List shows a 2nd Lieutenant C. Waite on the strength of the 4th Battalion (Extra Reserve), West Yorkshire Regiment, with seniority from the 1st August 1917.

There is a medal index card for a 2nd Lieutenant Charles Waite, West Yorkshire Regiment, who had previously been Lance Corporal 13975 West Yorkshire Regiment. He first landed in France on the 26th August 1915. He was discharged to a commission on the 31st July 1917.

The MiC shows he died of wounds on the 28th March 1918.

CWGC records him as 4th Battalion, attached 2/8th Battalion West Yorkshire Regiment when he died on the 28th March 1918. He is buried at St. Hilaire Cemetery, Frevent, France. https://www.cwgc.org/find-records/find-war-dead/casualty-details/528079/C WAITE/

His father, J. Waite Esq., of 129 The Avenue, Starbeck. Yorkshire, applied for his medals.

May be a co-incidence, but on the 1911 Census of England and Wales therr is a 20 year old Charles Waite, a Grocers Assistant, born Starbeck, who was recorded living at 115, The Avenue, Starbeck, Harrogate, Yorkshire. This was the household of his parents John, a Railway Engine Driver, and Edith.

No joy with tracking down the London Gazette entry. Quite why he should be gazetted a month or so after the others identified so far is unknown. So for now more of a possible rather than a probable.

Cheers,
Peter

Edited by PRC
Typo
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 05/09/2021 at 16:50, PRC said:

 

Taking a further look:-

2073046033_JBParks.jpeg.e7363f4e093d341eb43b0402199449a8.jpeg

J.B. Parks. Identified by @arantxa as an Essex Regiment man.

Unfortunately unless he was one of the instructors, J.B. Parks according to the October 1917 British Army Monthly list had been a Second Lieutenant since the 2nd December 1915 and had been a temporary Captain since the 1st March 1916. The October 1917 list has a second entry showing him attached to the New Zealand Contingent.

There is a MiC for a James Balfour Parks, originally Rifleman 1441 6th Bn Liverpool Regiment and subsequently Second Lieutenant and Acting Captain Kings Own (Royal Lancaster) Regiment. However his MiC shows him commissioned 24th October 1916.

There are no other J.B. Parkes in the Index to the October 1917 list.

The index shows a J.B. Parke – but he was a Lieutenant in our old favourite, the 18th (Reserve) Battalion, Royal Irish Regiment with seniority from the 1st March 1916.:)

There is also a J.B. Park. But he was 5th Cameronians attached 6th Battalion as Transport Officer, and although a Second-Lieutenant, his seniority was from the 5th February 1915.

 

I think it is  James Balfour Parks of the Liverpool Regiment you identified above . 

Although the M.I.C. gives the commission date as 24 . 10 . 16 , the medal roll shows him to commission 26 .6 .17 .

Image courtesy of Ancestry .185828091_jamesbalfourparks.png.6ef19eafa6088cdea231906022528311.png

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Regarding Peters thought regarding Hall/Hill. Not convinced re. the signature, however Walter Henry Hill, S/968 was at Pirbright, commissioned into the 6th RB on 27/6/17 going onto the 10th RB and was killed in action on 20/11/17. He was originally 8th RB, wounded by GSW thigh at Hooge on 31/7/15 and returned to the UK again in March 1916 with Pyrexia. Eventually sent to the 4th RB in September 1916, returned home as candidate for commission on 12/1/17 going to 19th OCB on 16/3/17, to commission with 6th RB on 27/6/17.

Fits regarding Peters great work date wise 

 

Andy 

Screenshot 2021-09-06 at 22.07.44.png

Screenshot 2021-09-06 at 22.25.44.png

Screenshot 2021-09-06 at 22.26.15.png

Screenshot 2021-09-06 at 22.11.23.png

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1973309767_RBrough.jpg.717fe6d9304f788fc4c6607568b91eb5.jpg

Does this man look suitably Orcadian:)

 R. Brough  - Supplement to the London Gazette 20 July 1917 page 7420 as per @esco. Cadet Robert Sibbald Calderwood Brough to be a 2nd Lt in the Territorial Force w.e.f. 27th June 1917.

 The October 1917 Army List records him on the establishment of the 1st Lovat’s Scouts, Territorial Yeomanry. He is not shown with either the 1/1st or 2/1st.  https://digital.nls.uk/british-military-lists/archive/106324132

There are Territorial Force enlistment papers for a Robert Stibbald Calderwood Brough. Aged 19 years and 5 months when he enlisted for four years in the 1st Highland Field Company, Royal Engineers at Glasgow on the 25th May 1909.

Robert was born Rosneath near Helensburgh in the county of Dumbarton. By now a warehouseman for Barrte & Dick, he was living a 14 West End Park Street, (presumably in Glasgow).

A single man, he had no previous military experience. He was described as 5 feet 11 and a half inches tall.  He was given service number 8453.

But this was his signature on his attestation.

1881964642_RobertSCBroughTFenlistment1909sourcedFMPsignaturecrop.jpg.c3838cd1be04cbcc38c3da5f7319fcb9.jpg

Image courtesy of FindMyPast.

Perhaps some similarity with the “Brough” part. Remember these two signatures were only about 8 years apart.

His trade and special qualifications are shown as Warehouseman at which he was rated “Very Good”. He attended the annual camps in 1909, 1910, 1911 and 1912. He was discharged on the 24th May 1913, having completed his four year term.

His Medal Index Card simply records him as a 2nd Lieutenant, Lovats Scouts. He went to France, landing on the 25th December 1917. He received the Military Cross.

He applied for his medals in May 1920, giving his correspondence address as c\o Ellis, 14 West End Park Street, Glasgow.

The card is noted “No record of Mention in Dispatches”, so I assume Robert believed there had been one.

The Brough One Name Study website has this for him.

Born c1890
1891 Census of Scotland.  Lochside Cottage, Rosneath, Dumbartonshire, Scotland.
1901 Census of Scotland. Rosebank, Row, Dumbartonshire, Scotland.
1911 Census of Scotland. West End Park Street, Hillhead, Glasgow, Lanarkshire, Scotland.
1914-1918. Second Lieutenant, Lovat's Scouts attached to 15 Batt HLI; Awarded the Military Cross.
1926 – 20th May, at 81 Scott Street, Glasgow, Lanarkshire, Scotland.
Robert Brough shot and killed his landlady’s fiancé, Robert Hamilton, following an evening of heavy drinking. With a defence of shell shock and heavy drinking as mitigating factors, he was found not guilty allowing him to walk free.

Parents were James Brough (1851-1905) and Christina McMillan. (c1851-1919).
 https://brough.one-name.net/getperson.php?personID=I29391&tree=Brough

His Military Cross citation from the Supplement to the Edinburgh Gazette dated October 8, 1919, Page 3246.

2111981625_RobertBroughMilitaryCrosscitationfromtheSupplementtotheEdinburghGazettedatedOctober81919Page3246.jpg.2ec325b73c0a1a2bf272ab2516cdc590.jpg

https://www.thegazette.co.uk/Edinburgh/issue/13510/page/3246/data.pdf

The Glasgow 1920 List of Absent Voters records a Sibbald C. Brough against 14 West End Park Street – but unfortunately the transcribers have not shown his unit. https://www.glasgowfamilyhistory.org.uk/blog/Documents/Absent Voters - Spring 1920 - Alphabetical.pdf

From The Dundee Courier dated 7 July 1926, page 5 -  “Brough found not guilty”

854199555_DundeeCourier07July1926p5BroughfoundnotguiltysourcedFMP.jpg.4d9cd5dc37fa0dadcbad144833a948e9.jpg

Image courtesy FindMyPast.

His subsequent fate seems to be a mystery.

Cheers,
Peter

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, stiletto_33853 said:

Regarding Peters thought regarding Hall/Hill. Not convinced re. the signature, however Walter Henry Hill, S/968 was at Pirbright, commissioned into the 6th RB on 27/6/17 going onto the 10th RB and was killed in action on 20/11/17. He was originally 8th RB, wounded by GSW thigh at Hooge on 31/7/15 and returned to the UK again in March 1916 with Pyrexia. Eventually sent to the 4th RB in September 1916, returned home as candidate for commission on 12/1/17 going to 19th OCB on 16/3/17, to commission with 6th RB on 27/6/17.

Fits regarding Peters great work date wise 

 

Andy 

Screenshot 2021-09-06 at 22.07.44.png

Screenshot 2021-09-06 at 22.25.44.png

Screenshot 2021-09-06 at 22.26.15.png

Screenshot 2021-09-06 at 22.11.23.png

I think it is actually W. Neill - William Neill william neill.pdf

Formerly   51 South Irish Horse . Commissioned 28.6 .17 .

Edited by esco
Link to comment
Share on other sites

as some of the men seem to have been watering down the ink in their pens I've run a crude contrast boost and colour change on the large photo to see if that helps make them more readable.

Suggestions for some f the names along the bottom 

GJ (or Y) Mears-  G Mears school record for 1902 Norfolk FMP, George James two army ref- 1915 and 1919 both for born 1888 Leytonstone Essex, A George James b 1888 died in Wanstead ESX in 1933, Cann Hall West Ham in 1911. GJ has National Roll and MIC . George J married 1919 west Ham, also George James married 1919 Leytonstone (I haven;t checked yet to see if this is one and the same) several MIC under George J. Tentatively I would suggest George James of West Ham/ Leytonstone as a possible here but I haven't gone further than index entries on FMP.

P Young

AH Barr

?N Henderson

A Robinson

J Isack

EC Thompson

GE Stanley- 1887 , Ary medical records in 1918, George E stanley b 1887 Eston, Middlesborough YRK in 1911 census. George Ernest b 1891 - long service and gallantry awrds,

(Hank) Candles - I don't think it is Hank but can;t make much sens of the letteres there- looks like Han K then surname.

R Peiland? (the chap sitting on the ground in the middle)

AR Moore

? Pearce

JA ?Grates? Coates? Crates?

JG Ballard

NC Stark

(Can) S Clements

H Twigg- Royal Engineers (1900 -1949) 1929 electoral register for Norfolk and an H 1939 people in the news both on FMP. 1917 and 1918 London Gazette FMP only gives tyear and RAF roll, several memorials and 2 MICs. all FMP

EB /EE Joyce? Lynn?Lyons?

JWH Rees?

G O ' Reilly

R J O Greenwood/ Greenworth

Old??? Wells

 

1040928050_GWF(2).jpg.e73b9e80505ca8229e4302976f54f986.jpg

Edited by Madmeg
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Possibles for names along the bottom approximately from left to right. Remember these are best guesses at this stage :)

? R R?????

G.F. Muir

C Young – Possibly Cadet gazetted Second Lieutenant in the supplement dated 17th July 1917, Page 7200 Kings Own Scottish Borderers John Young.

A H Barr - Supplement to the London Gazette 20 July 1917 page 7420 as per @esco. Cadet Harry Alexander Barr to be a 2nd Lt in the Territorial Force w.e.f. 27th June 1917.

M ?????? (Albon?)

A Rol????

J.Todd

?????? (F. Cossey?)

E C Thompson

G E Casley (or Stanley?)

F Ian Candle or Frank Candle – Possibly Cadet gazetted Second Lieutenant in the supplement dated 17th July 1917, Page 7200 Gloucestershire Regiment Ernest John Rundle.

D P Da????

J.H. Gales or Gates -  Possibly Cadet gazetted Second Lieutenant in the supplement dated 17th July 1917, Page 7199 Lincolnshire Regiment Henry James Gale or Page 7200 Middlesex Regiment Henry Alfred Gates.

A R Moore

H. Pearce – the October 1917 Army List shows a W.E Pearce, a Second Lieutenant with seniority from the 27th June 1917. On the establishment of  the Regular Army Battalions of the Middlesex Regiment. https://digital.nls.uk/british-military-lists/archive/106331436

J G Ballard?

???????

Frank S. Clements

N. C. Starks – Cadet gazetted Second Lieutenant in the supplement dated 17th July 1917, Page 7200 Duke of Cornwall Light Infantry Norman Charles Starks.

H.Twigg – Cadet gazetted Second Lieutenant in the supplement dated 17th July 1917, Page 7201 Manchester Regiment Harry Twigg.

E.E. Lyon

Jno H Rees  - Supplement to the London Gazette 20 July 1917 page 7420 as per @esco. Cadet John Harry Rees to be a 2nd Lt in the Territorial Force w.e.f. 27th June 1917.

Old Wells

Geo. O. Perry, or Penny or Purdy

B J.O. Greenwood – Supplement to the London Gazette 20 July 1917 page 7420 as per @esco. Cadet Blake John Greenwood to be a 2nd Lt in the Territorial Force w.e.f. 27th June 1917.

W.Simpson –  Cadet gazetted Second Lieutenant in the supplement dated 17th July 1917, Page 7201 York and Lancaster Regiment William Simpson.

Alg. Andrews

J. Evans Yreorci – Probably Cadet gazetted Second Lieutenant in the supplement dated 17th July 1917, Page 7200 Welsh Regiment John Evans.

Cheers.
Peter

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I’m amazed by everyone’s replies that’s super !!!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Day.jpg.af5a1e5cc507e4002680f4dcefa4c7de.jpg

My original thought was D L Day, but now I’ve cropped the signature I’m thinking something more like W.L. J????? or D.L.Johns.

Perhaps a better image would help @arantxa – that was one of the few I had to crop from the full picture.

1164105025_Hallcrop.jpg.5c0ad961b0db345aac1413e18b2560d1.jpg

 

On 06/09/2021 at 22:27, stiletto_33853 said:

Regarding Peters thought regarding Hall/Hill. Not convinced re. the signature, however Walter Henry Hill, S/968 was at Pirbright, commissioned into the 6th RB on 27/6/17 going onto the 10th RB and was killed in action on 20/11/17. He was originally 8th RB, wounded by GSW thigh at Hooge on 31/7/15 and returned to the UK again in March 1916 with Pyrexia. Eventually sent to the 4th RB in September 1916, returned home as candidate for commission on 12/1/17 going to 19th OCB on 16/3/17, to commission with 6th RB on 27/6/17.

Andy - I would so like that to be the man who autographed the picture  - but looks like there is also another candidate.

22 hours ago, esco said:

I think it is actually W. Neill - William Neill william neill.pdf

Formerly   51 South Irish Horse . Commissioned 28.6 .17 .

@esco - that does look like it could be a better fit.  (Btw - I'm not very good at deciphering signatures - I'm just prepared to put my hand up and have a guess in the hope that someone will come along and correct me :)

MiC shows that man as Serjeant \(Squadron Quarter Master Serjeant)  51 William Simpson Neill, South Irish Horse, subsequently 2nd Lieutenant  2nd Reserve Cavalry. A pre-war special reservist, he had landed in France on the 17th August 1914. He is shown as commissioned on the 28th June 1917.

He applied for his medals in May 1920 giving a contact address of Fox Hill,  Athy, County Kildare. His medals were issued by the the South Irish Horse, so possibly he had reverted to them by the time the medals were to be authorised.

There is no W. Neill listed on the strength of the 2nd Reserve Regiment of Cavalry in the October 1917 Army List – in fact I struggled to track him at all.

The South Irish Horse website records him as William S. Neill  - 2nd Lt,29th June 1917. Lieut, 29th December 1919. Attached Nottinghamshire Yeomanry. http://www.southirishhorse.com/documents/officers_siy_sih.htm

South Irish Horse.

August 1914 : based in Dublin, the regiment was strictly a unit of the Special Reserve. No Territorial Force regiments of the Yeomanry were established in Ireland and the South Irish Horse provided a mounted form of part-time soldiering. It was mobilised on declaration of war but very soon split up. The squadrons served mainly attached to Divisions until 1916, and then attached to a Corps. After September 1917, the original regiment served as infantry and three new squadrons were formed.

A Special Service Squadron (possibly formed from B Squadron and soon referred to as S Squadron) moved to France as GHQ Troops on 17 August 1914, one of the very few non-regular units to form part of the original BEF. Joined 2nd Division on 4 May 1915. On 15 May 1916 it left and went to form part of I Corps Cavalry Regiment. Source: https://www.longlongtrail.co.uk/army/regiments-and-corps/cavalry-regiments/the-south-irish-horse/

Nottinghamshire Yeomanry.

1/1st Nottinghamshire Yeomanry

February 1916 : moved to Salonika, with brigade retitled as 7th Mounted Brigade.
June 1917 : brigade began to return to Egypt but ship carrying troops was torpedoed and the men returned to Mudros.
4 July 1917 : arrived in Egypt and brigade placed under orders of Desert Mounted Corps.
May 1918 : brigade placed under new 2nd Mounted Division.
July 1918 : brigade renamed as 14th Cavalry Brigade and division became 5th Cavalry Division.

2/1st

July 1916 : division changed title again to 1st Mounted Division. Regiment now in 1st Mounted Brigade and had moved to Thorndon Park near Brentwood (Essex).
August 1917 : converted to a cyclist unit and under orders of 11th Cyclist Brigade in Cyclist Division in Canterbury (Kent) area. https://www.longlongtrail.co.uk/army/regiments-and-corps/the-british-yeomanry-regiments-of-1914-1918/nottinghamshire-yeomanry-sherwood-rangers/

The birth of a William Simpson Neill was registered with the civil authorities in the Athy District of Ireland in the April to June quarter, (Q2), of 1887. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FBZH-YZZ

The marriage of a William Simpson Neill was recorded in the Athy District in the April to June quarter, (Q2), of 1920. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FYF2-1TL

From the Leinster  Leader for Saturday, 3rd April 1948.

Esteemed Farmer’s Death.

The death occurred in a Dublin hospital on Thursday of Mr. William S. Neill, Foxhill, Athy, one of the most highly esteemed men in the district. An extensive farmer, he served with distinction in the first Great War in the South Irish Horse. A keen and enthusiastic sportsman, he was for many years a prominent playing member of Athy Hockey Club.

Deceased was popular with all classes, and the sympathy of the people in the area is extended to the widow and his daughter and two sons in bereavement. He was interred in St. Michael’s Cemetery, Athy, after a Burial Service conducted by Rev. A.M. Dodds, Presbyterian Minister, Athy.

Cheers,
Peter

Link to comment
Share on other sites

176134560_LowCrop.jpg.3c3e8b91cec0b090a214ba81666c1d95.jpg

G.A. Low

Cadet gazetted Second Lieutenant in the supplement dated 17th July 1917, Page 7200, Royal Scots Fusiliers, George Alexander Low.

The Medal Index Card for George Alexander  Low shows he had originally been Lance Corporal 1796 Royal Highlanders when he first landed in France on the 2nd May 1915. This may well have been a Territorial Force Battalion he was to serve with, as it appears he was renumbered at the start of 1917 as 265396.
(LLT has the 1/6th (Perthshire)Battalion and the 1/7th (Fife) Battalion landing at Boulogme on the 2nd May 1915. 265396 comes from the number block, 265001 to 290000, allocated to the 6th Battalions of the Royal Highlanders (Black Watch))

The MiC says he was commissioned on the 26th June 1916, but I suspect this may be an error - particularly because of the 1917 TF renumbering.

In the October 1917 Army List, Second Lieutenant G.A Low appears on the strength of the Regular Army Battalions  of the Royals Scots Fusiliers with seniority of the 27th June 1917,  (Column 1096d) https://digital.nls.uk/british-military-lists/archive/106328884

According to the MiC George was killed in action on the 28th September 1918. There is no name or contact address shown for whoever claimed his medals.

Second Lieutenant George Alexander Low, was serving with the 2nd Battalion Royal Scots Fusiliers when he was killed in action on the 28th September 1918.  It looks like his body was recovered from an isolated battlefield grave at map reference I.11.b..8.5 in February 1919 and moved to Hooge Crater Cemetery, (map reference Sheet 28  I.18.a.9.5).

There is no additional family details or age shown on his CWGC webpage. https://www.cwgc.org/find-records/find-war-dead/casualty-details/458588/G A LOW/

The 2nd Battalion were then part of the 28th Brigade, 9th (Scottish) Division. https://www.longlongtrail.co.uk/army/regiments-and-corps/the-british-infantry-regiments-of-1914-1918/the-royal-scots-fusiliers-in-1914-1918/

Battalion War Diary simply reads:-

27th September 1918. Battn. moved up to behind YPRES by train.Moved into assembly positions.
IN THE FIELD. In position 4 A.M. Bombardment on left opened at 3.30 A.M.

28th September 1918. Barrage came down 5.30 AM. – objective reached 11.45 A.M. Casualties  - 10 Officers – 132 OR – Captures 300 prisoners approx. – 3 Field Guns – numerous machine guns.

29th September 1918. Formed up on line of ZONNEBEKE – POLYGON BUTT. 2/R.S.F. in Brigade Reserve. Brigade advanced with very little opposition until they encountered the WATERDAMHOUK – DADIZEELE Redge – when all three Btns were held up for a time owing to the 36th Division being slow in progressing.

There are no appendices to that months diary included in the version available from the National Archive.

Battle of Ypres 1918 28-Sep-1918— 02-Oct-1918

This battle was also known as the Advance in Flanders or the Battle of the Peaks of Flanders. Unofficially it is sometimes known as the Fifth Battle of Ypres. On 28 September 1918 the Allied Army Group of Flanders attacked and broke through the German Front to the north, east and south of the city of Ypres. This Allied Army Group comprised British, French and Belgian divisions and was under the command of King Albert I of Belgium. Casualties were over 4,500 for both the British and the Belgian forces. The progress of the advance was significant, with the recapture of the Kemmelberg and several miles of territory lost to the German advance in April earlier that year.

    28-Sep-1918 Messines is retaken by British forces.

   29-Sep-1918 Passchendaele is retaken by Allied forces. 

The Allied advance to the west, pushing the German Army further away from Ypres and the destruction left in the area from four years of fighting, continued with the Battle of Courtrai. http://www.greatwar.co.uk/battles/ypres-salient/1918-battles-ypres-salient.htm

The Groupe d'Armées des Flandres (GAF, Flanders Army Group, King of the Belgians) attacked at 5:30 a.m. on 28 September, after a three hour artillery preparation. The GAF attacked with 12 Belgian divisions, 10 British divisions of the Second Army and 6 French divisions of the Sixth Army. The British attacked on a 4.5 mi (7.2 km) front up to the Ypres–Zonnebeke road, from where the Belgian army attacked on a line north to Dixmude. The Allied attacks quickly penetrated the German defences and advanced up to 6 mi (9.7 km). Much of the ground west of Passchendaele, abandoned during the withdrawal of early 1918, was recaptured. Rain began to fall but by the evening the British had taken Kortewilde, Zandvoorde, Kruiseecke and Becelaere; Belgian troops had captured Zonnebeke, Poelcappelle, Schaap Baillie and Houthulst Forest. On the southern flank, minor operations by three British divisions advanced to St. Yves, Messines and the ridge from Wytschaete to Hollebeke. The German front line ran from Diksmuide to Houthult, Becelare, Zandvoorde and Hollebeke. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fifth_Battle_of_Ypres

No obvious Civil Probate for George Alexander Low. .

Cheers,
Peter

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1750743797_Beattiecrop.jpg.e5a9c056e42b41296c6285d0cad50384.jpg

My first guess was M. Beattie – but the October 1917 Army List shows a C. Beattie, a Second Lieutenant with seniority from the 27th June 1917. On the establishment of the Regular Army Battalions of the Middlesex Regiment, he was attached to the 21st Battalion. https://digital.nls.uk/british-military-lists/archive/106331425

I struggled to find the gazetting of C. Beattie to confirm his first name. However I did come across a Second Lieutenant C. Beattie, Middlesex Regiment, Regular Army listed on Page 11261 of the Supplement  to the London Gazette  31 October 1917 and who had seniority from the 27th June 1917. This was actually part of a long list of Second Lieutenants who were to a be moved from a status of attached and instead transferred to a Service Battalion. A number of them have seniority from the 27th June 1917. But the officers listed for the Middlesex Regiment with that seniority also don’t seem to turn up on a search for their gazetting. https://www.thegazette.co.uk/London/issue/30359/supplement/11261/data.pdf

The Medal Index card for Cecil Beattie shows that he was originally Private 16636 Liverpool Regiment when he first landed in France on the 7th November 1915. He subsequently made Sergeant, before being commissioned  in the Middlesex Regiment as a Second Lieutenat. No date of commissioning is shown.

He is shown as in the remarks section of the MiC as “Dis” which I would take to mean he was discharged from his commission. He applied for a Silver War Badge, with one being issued in November 1919.

He applied for his service medals in November 1922. He gave a contact address of 5 Hardshaw Street, St. Helens, Lancashire.

The Ruskington War Memorial website lists the Middlesex Regiment Officer as one of those from the village who served – his brother Sydney died of pneumonia in October 1918 while serving with a home-service only Battalion of the Lincomshire Regiment.

It has this picture from the time of the enlistment in the Liverpool Regiment.

1131785509_PrivateCBeattiesourcedRuskingtonWarMemorialcouktheyalsoservedad.jpg.f7598467f61b3b38e67a15fbc5a44d5d.jpg

http://www.ruskingtonwarmemorials.co.uk/they-also-served-a-d/

If the autograph is over the officer concerned on the picture, then is there a facial match between the man in the Ruskington sourced picture and the man on the right in this crop?

307216439_BeattieCropwithfaces.jpg.b68387f372d3fbfe1d4b8363050bb5cc.jpg

The Ruskington site adds :

Lieutenant Cecil BEATTIE – when Cecil enlisted he was living at School House, High Street, Ruskington, Lincolnshire.

He was born on 25 September 1894, the elder son of Charles (Schoolmaster) and Louisa (née Barrell) (Schoolmistress) Beattie of that address, located next to the village School.

Charles’ younger brother, Private 202413 Sydney Beattie, 4th Battalion, Lincolnshire Regiment, died on 19 October 1918 in the Military Hospital, Lincoln, possibly of the influenza epidemic, rife at the time.

He enlisted as soon as War was declared, initially as Private 16636 King’s Liverpool Regiment. He was posted to France on 7 November 1915 and later promoted to Sergeant.

After Officer Training Cecil was posted to the Middlesex Regiment as a 2nd Lieutenant, and whilst serving with them was wounded and awarded the Silver War Badge.

When Cecil married Ethel May Stone on 21 May 1918 at the Parish Church, Ducklington with Hardwick, Oxfordshire, his Marriage Certificate states his Rank as “Lieutenant, Middlesex Regiment“.

The 1939 Return shows Cecil living with his retired parents at 13A Whiteside Way, Thornton Cleveleys, with “Joan L. Beattie” and 12 year old Ian. Cecil was 64 when he died in the Ealing District, in the September quarter 1958. http://www.ruskingtonwarmemorials.co.uk/they-also-served-a-d/

Note, because only a limited selection of information has been made available by the UK Government in releasing parts of the 1939 Register, it cannot be assumed that Joan L. Beattie, a married woman, is the wife of Cecil, nor can it be assumed that Ian A. Beattie, (as he is shown on the actual document), is a son of either of them.

Cecil and Ethel do not obviously appear to have had any children, at least as far as the records of England & Wales are concerned. Similarly there is no marriage of a Cecil Beattie to a Joan showing up in the records in England & Wales, nor a birth of an Ian Beattie with or without the middle initial -  there is an Ian B., registered in the Newcastle upon Tyne District, in Q1 1928, but his mothers’ maiden name was Dodds. (The 1939 Register individual was born December 1927).  Joan L. Beattie is shown as born 26th September 1900.

A marriage announcement for Cecil and Ethel appeared in the edition of the Oxfordshire Weekly news dated 12th June 1918.

BARRIE – STONE. – May 21, at St. Bartholomew’s Church, Ducklington, by the Rev. C. Tristram, (rector), Cecil Beattie, 2nd Lt. Middlesex Regt., elder son of Mr. and Mrs. C. Beattie. Ruskington, Lincolnshire, to Ethel Mary, only daughter of the late Mr. W.T. Stone and Mrs. Stone, Mill Farm, Hardwick, Oxfordshire.

There is a very likely candidate for Ethel, aged 8 and born Ducklington wjo was recorded living in a dwelling in the village, the house of parents William Thomas and Sarah. That would place her birth as circa 1892. There is no obvious remarriage of Ethel in England & Wales. May be a co-incidence but the death of an Ethel Mary Beattie, born 10th June 1892, was recorded in the Witney District of Oxfordshire in Q3 1970. That is the same civil registration district as where the marriage was recorded in 1918. There is no obvious match for her on the 1939 Register.

I’ll leave the domestic arrangement there for now, as I’m not sure it will help us much further in tieing up the man in the pictures of the cadets with the records, military and civil, uncovered for Cecil.

Cheers,
Peter

Edited by PRC
Typo
Link to comment
Share on other sites

40 minutes ago, esco said:

I think it may be a H.,          H.    Beattie M.C.   https://www.thegazette.co.uk/London/issue/30187/supplement/7200

That man is in the gazette as Harry Weston Beattie. He gets a number of mentions in Essex newspapers in connection with the award of the Military Cross - but no pictures of him that I could readily find.

To my mind the forename part of the signature is an amalgam of two letters - but I'm not seeing H & W.

Checking out the likely birth records for Cecil Beattie, it looks likely he was born September 1893 rather than the 1894 shown on the Ruskington site. But no midde names.

However we do have a picture of Cecil Beattie and to my eyes there is no immediate reason to reject it out of hand as a match for the man most likely to be Cadet Beattie.

Next steps other than tracking down a picture of Harry Weston Beattie would most likely involve financial outlay.

  • Getting access to both officers service records to compare the signatures
  • Obtaining copies of marriage certificates to compare the signatures
  • Obtaining a copy of the probate - to compare the signatures!
  • Awaiting the release of the 1921 Census of England & Wales. If either man was the head of the household then they are likely to have signed the census declaration.

The only likely birth in England & Wales for Harry Weston Beattie was registered in the Greenwich District of London in the April to June quarter of 1896. Mothers' maiden name was Payne. Parents are likely to be the James Alexander Beattie and Marion Elizaneth Payne whose marriage was recorded in the Holborn District in Q1 1896.
On the 1901 Census of England & Wales Harry, (aged 5, born New Cross, London) and parents James A. (Lithographic Printer) and Marion E and two sisters were one of the three households at 48 Islip Street, St Pancras, London.
On the 1911 Census of England & Wales the family were living at 95 Drayton Road, Haselden, London N.W. Harry, (15), has no occupation recorded against him and I suspect he may still be at school.
Struggled to find a MiC in both the National Archive catalogue and on Ancestry.

Possibly married Rose Foy in the Bethnal Green District of London in Q1 1920
1939 Register has a married man, Harry. W. Beattie, a Lithographic Printer born 11th March 1896 and a married woman Rose Beattie, a Cigar Maker, recorded as making up one of the three households at 164 Cheshire Street, Bethnal Green.

The death of a Harry W, Beattie, aged 45, was recorded in the Bethnal Green District in Q3 1941. He does not appear on CWGC as a civilian air raid casualty. There is no obvious probate for him.

Regards,
Peter

Link to comment
Share on other sites

237035239_RoxbyCrop.jpg.28e9bb9349566440d7c8757642be5d62.jpg

On 05/09/2021 at 23:17, esco said:

M. Rigby   - H.V. Roxby  ( Harold Victor Roxby) .

Harold Victor Roxby.

The Supplement to the London Gazette, 17th July, 1917, page 7199, shows Cadet Harold Victor Roxby to be 2nd Lieutenant in the Yorkshire Regiment with seniority from the 27th June 1917. https://www.thegazette.co.uk/London/issue/30187/supplement/7199/data.pdf

His Medal Index Card shows when he first landed in France on the 27th February 1915 he was Corporal 2126 in the Yorkshire Regiment. Its not clear from the MiC but he was then either 330117 in the Yorkshire Regiment or 330117 in a unit that both the National Archive and Ancestry have interpreted as the Corps of Hussars. He was released from his enlistment on the 26th June 1917 to take up his commission. His 1914/15 Star was issued by the Cavalry, while his Victory Medal and British War Medal entitlement appears on the Yorkshire Regiment Officers Roll.

As he had been gazetted into the Regular Army there is no real surprise that in the October 1917 Army List a Second Lieutenant H.V. Roxby, with seniority from the 27th June 1917 turns up on the establishment of the Regular Army Battalions of the Yorkshire Regiment, (column 1076c). However he is shown as attached to the 2nd Battalion. https://digital.nls.uk/british-military-lists/archive/106328675

Had a brief forum thread of his own – joined 2nd Battalion at Corruna Camp, near Westoutre on August 19th 1917.

PM sent to the OP of that thread as they were related by marriage to Harold Roxby.

By the time of the November 1918 Army list he is till shown as a Second Lieutenant serving with the 2nd Battalion. (Column 1075e). https://digital.nls.uk/british-military-lists/archive/123100065

According to MiC Harold finished the war as a Lieutenant. The MiC also references the issuing of emblems, which I believe possibly relates to a Mention in Dispatches. He applied for his medals in November 1920, initially giving an address of 39 Yeoman Street, Redcar-by-the-Sea, Yorkshire, but during the process of the claim being dealt with, this changed to 88 Ayresome Street, Middlesbrough.

The only like birth record in England & Wales was that of a Harold Victor Roxby, mothers’ maiden name Lee, whose birth was registered with the civil authorities in the Middlesbrough District of Yorkshire in Q3 1892. On the 1911 Census of England & Wales he was recorded as a Brewery Clerk, living with his parents, two siblings and a cousin at 88 Ayresome Street, Middlesbrough.

In the April to June quarter, (Q2), of 1919, a Harold V. Roxby married a Bessie Cook in the Middlesbrough District.

On the 1939 Register a Harold V. Roxby, born 19th July 1892 and a married Welfare Officer was recorded as the third person in the household at 52 The Avenue, Middlesbrough. The first person in the household is a married woman, Bessie Roxby, born 5th August 1896, and carrying out unpaid domestic duties. The record of the second person in the household is officially closed.

Harold would be in uniform again in WW2 as a Lieutenant in the Royal Army Pay Corps from the 19th March 1941. https://www.thegazette.co.uk/London/issue/35133/supplement/2094/data.pdf

The death of a Harold V. Roxby, aged 65, was recorded in the Middlesbrough District in the April to June quarter, (Q2), of 1958. No obvious civil probate.

Cheers,
Peter

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Amazing 

most of them did not live to a ripe old age

its interesting to see what happened to these faces 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 hours ago, esco said:

D.L.Day  , do you think it could be W.T. Doe ?  https://www.thegazette.co.uk/London/issue/30193/supplement/7421

William Thomas Doe .

@esco - could well be. I can't make out the signature well enough to really agree or disagree in a meaningful way.

884067972_Humphreycrop.jpg.57dfb922df9f2d848cae3138f3fd5e4b.jpg

Frederick Basil Humphrey.

Supplement to the London Gazette 20 July 1917 page 7420 as per @esco. Cadet Frederick Basil Humphrey to be a 2nd Lt in the Territorial Force w.e.f. 27th June 1917.

On the October 1917 Army list he is shown on the strength of the Norwich Yeomanry, along with L. Oldroyd. Both are 2nd Lieutenants with seniority from the 27th June 1917.

There is no obvious Medal Index Card for him.

In the November 1918 Army List he is shown on the strength of the 2/1st Norfolk Yeomanry.

The Long, Long Trail shows the following for that unit :-

July 1916: converted to a cyclist unit in 5th Cyclist Brigade, under 2nd Cyclist Division.
November 1916: merged with 2/1st Suffolk Yeomanry to form 7th (Suffolk and Norfolk) Yeomanry Cyclist Regiment, under command of 3rd Cyclist Brigade.
March 1917 : resumed original identity but in same brigade, now in Ipswich area. Moved to Woodbridge by July 1917.
May 1918: moved to Ireland, being at Castlereagh and then Gort.

 https://www.longlongtrail.co.uk/army/regiments-and-corps/the-british-yeomanry-regiments-of-1914-1918/norfolk-yeomanry-the-kings-own-royal-regiment/

Wood.jpeg.fe90d9b4056a0fd84e8a2694925c2522.jpeg

Robert Smith Wood.

The Supplement to the London Gazette, 17th July, 1917, page 7199, shows Cadet Robert Smith Wood to be 2nd Lieutenant in the Royal Scots Regiment with seniority from the 27th June 1917. This was a temporary Regular Army commission.

The Medal Index Card shows that he first landed in France on the 2nd May 1915 as Corporal 2398 Royal Highlanders.

The LLT shows the 1/6th (Perthshire) and 1/7th (Fife) Battalions landed at Boulogne on the 2nd May 1915. https://www.longlongtrail.co.uk/army/regiments-and-corps/the-british-infantry-regiments-of-1914-1918/royal-highlanders-black-watch/

He was subsequently 290568 in the same Regiment. (MiC)

In the Territorial Force renumbering at the start of 1917, the block 290001 to 315000 was allocated to the 7th Battalions of the Royal Highlanders. https://www.longlongtrail.co.uk/soldiers/a-soldiers-life-1914-1918/renumbering-of-the-territorial-force-in-1917/renumbering-the-tf-infantry-in-1917/

He was discharged from his enlistment on the 26th July 1917 to take up his commission in the Royal Scots the next day. (MiC)

In the October 1917 Army List he is just shown on the establishment of the Regular Army Battalions of the Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment) – column 896c. https://digital.nls.uk/british-military-lists/archive/106326915

The MiC shows he Died of Wounds on the 24th November 1917.

CWGC has Second Lieutenant Robert Smith Wood serving with the 2nd Battalion when he died on the 24th November 1917. He is buried at Grevillers British Cemetery in France. https://www.cwgc.org/find-records/find-war-dead/casualty-details/291382/ROBERT SMITH WOOD/

The CWGC webpage for that Cemetery notes Grevillers is a village in the Department of the Pas de Calais, 3 kilometres west of Bapaume. The village of Grevillers was occupied by Commonwealth troops on 14 March 1917 and in April and May, the 3rd, 29th and 3rd Australian Casualty Clearing Stations were posted nearby. They began the cemetery and continued to use it until March 1918, when Grevillers was lost to the German during their great advance. https://www.cwgc.org/visit-us/find-cemeteries-memorials/cemetery-details/29602/GREVILLERS BRITISH CEMETERY/
(While there was some subsequent concentration of graves, Lieutenant Wood appears to have been buried here from the outset).

The 2nd Battalion, the Royal Scots, were part of the 8th Infantry Brigade of the 3rd Division. The LLT page for the 3rd Division in its’ list of actions it was involved in:-
The Battle of Cambrai 1917 (3rd Division carried out a flanking attack at Bullecourt on 20 November but this is technically outside the area considerd to be that over which Cambrai was fought)  http://www.longlongtrail.co.uk/army/order-of-battle-of-divisions/3rd-division/

An application for his medals was made by his widow, Mrs. R.S. Wood, of Doune Terrace, Kelty, Fifeshire.

No obvious Civil Probate.

The Scottish Civil Birth records have potentially three candidates, assuming Robert Smith Wood was the name he was registered with. One was in the Uphall District in 1883, one in the Beath District of Fife in 1889 and one in the Boyndie District in 1890.

The first one most likely died in the Uphall District in 1884.

Given the address of his widow, the Beath born man seems a likely candidate.

I only have access to basic transcripts of the Scottish Censuses up to 1901. On that there is an 11 year old Robert Wood, born Beath and still living there, who was recorded in the household of his parents David, (aged 56, a Coal Miner Inspector) and Catherine, (44). The couple have 5 other children living with them.

May be a co-incidence but a Robert Smith Wood married a Marion McGarrity in the Kelty District in 1913.

The Scotlands People site has a Soldiers Will for Robert Smith Wood, a Temporary 2nd Lieutenant in the Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment), who died in France on the 24th November 1917.

Hope that helps,
Peter

Link to comment
Share on other sites

its made a fascinating story of a picture

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well trying to work out the names along the bottom of the picture gets off to a bad start for me, as after a couple of days trying different possibilities in the October 1917 Army list I’m still none the wiser as to who this is the signature of:-

1071390622_Mysterysignature1.jpg.fb209c50794a2fe79b0ee122bf9c5522.jpg

Hopefully others will be more inspired.

Next up is

Mears.jpg.22210d304bd3e9f0fe7b11fe1c665fc7.jpg

Thanks to @esco most likely Cadet George Frederick Mears who was to be 2nd Lieutenant in the Territorial Force Yeomanry, effective 27th June 1917. Supplement to London Gazette, 20 July 1917, page 7420. https://www.thegazette.co.uk/London/issue/30193/supplement/7420 

His Medal Index Card shows he was originally service number 2412 Glamorgan Yeomanry – but no rank is shown. He was subsequently attached to the Welsh Regiment as a Second Lieutenant. He qualified for the Victory Medal and British War Medal only so did not serve in a Theatre of War until on or after the 1st January 1916. There is no first theatre or date of entry information. He applied for his medals in August 1925 and gave a contact address of The Bungalow, Woodhouse Lane, Quorn, Leicestershire.

The October 1917 Monthly Army List shows a 2nd Lieutenant G.F. Mears with seniority from the 27th June 1917 who was on the strength of the 2/1st Glamorgan Yeomanry. (Column 355) https://digital.nls.uk/british-military-lists/archive/106348838

LLT says:-

2/1st

Formed in September 1914 as a Second-Line unit and came under command of 2/1st South Wales Mounted Brigade in January 1915.
September 1915 : Brigade came under orders of 1st Mounted Division.
Brigade redesignated 4th Mounted Brigade in April 1916.
November 1916 : merged with 2/1st Pembroke Yeomanry to form the 2nd (Pembroke & Glamorgan Yeomanry) Cyclist Bn, in 1st Cyclist Brigade.
March 1917 : resumed identity, still in same Brigade.

 https://www.longlongtrail.co.uk/army/regiments-and-corps/the-british-yeomanry-regiments-of-1914-1918/glamorgan-yeomanry/

By the time of the May 1918 Army Monthly List he is now shown as Glamorgan Yeomanry attached 4th Reserve Battalion, Welsh Regiment. (Column 355) https://digital.nls.uk/british-military-lists/archive/106287245

It’s the same situation in the November 1918 Army Monthly List. (Column 355). https://digital.nls.uk/british-military-lists/archive/123094401

Again from the LLT, this time for the Welsh Regiment.

3/4th, 3/5th and 3/6th Battalions

Formed at home bases in March 1915 as training units.
Moved to Milford Haven. 3/4th Bn located at Hearston Camp.
8 April 1916 : became 4th, 5th and 6th Reserve Bns.
1 September 1816: 5th and 6th were absorbed into 4th Reserve Bn.

 https://www.longlongtrail.co.uk/army/regiments-and-corps/the-british-infantry-regiments-of-1914-1918/welsh-regiment/

So possibly the period of service which qualified him for service medals was his time in the ranks.

LLT has this for the 1/1st Glamorgan Yeomanry.

March 1916 : moved to Egypt and formed 4th Dismounted Brigade with the Welsh Border Mounted Brigade.
2 February 1917 : merged with 1/1st Pembroke Yeomanry to form the 24th (Pembroke & Glamorgan Yeomanry) Bn, the Welsh Regiment and came under orders of 231st Brigade in 74th (Yeomanry ) Division.

https://www.longlongtrail.co.uk/army/regiments-and-corps/the-british-yeomanry-regiments-of-1914-1918/glamorgan-yeomanry/

It may be a co-incidence but the birth of a George Frederick Mears was registered with the civil authorities at Swansea in the County of Glamorgan in the January to March quarter, (Q1), of 1890. Mothers’ maiden name was Broadbent. On the 1911 Census of England & Wales there is a 21 year old George Frederick Mears, born Swansea and a Clerk for a Coal Exporter, who was recorded living at Barton House, Gower Road, Sketty, Glamorganshire. This is the household of his parents, Francis D’Oyley Mears, a Brewery Manager, and Tabitha Ellen Mears. Among the other children living with Francis and Tabitha is a son  Charles Ernest Mears, aged 24 and a Locomotive Mechanic for a Railway Company and tieing back to the mothers’ maiden name recorded for George, there is a 13 year old Arthur Broadbent Mears.

There is a potential marriage of George F. Mears to a Gwendoline Taylor recorded at the Pernambuco consulate in Brazil in the period 1921-25.

On the 1939 Register there is a married man, George F. Mears, born 15th November 1889 who was recorded as the first person in the household at 4, Barleycroft Road, Welwyn Garden City, Hertfordshire. (You have 42 days after the event to register a birth, so that date of birth and the period the Swansea born man was registered are just about compatible). Georges’ occupation is shown as Shipping Agent and Commodity exporter in Brazil (retired). The second person is a married woman and almost certainly his wife, Gwendoline Mears, born 13th December 1894. The third person, Pamela Mears, born 24th September 1925 is probably a daughter.  There is an undated note, probably from the time the Register was in use by the NHS, that she had changed her surname to Nohre. Among the other residents is a married man Charles A. Mears, born 11th November 1886 and a “Sales Engineer to Gear Specialists (Mechanical Engineer) and his wife. That sounds like a fairly good match for the brother on the 1911 Census.

The death of a George F. Mears, aged 73, was recorded in the Nottingham District in Q4 1963. The 1963 Probate Calendar records that a George Frederick Mears, of 20 Sandy Lane, Bramcote Hills, Nottinghamshire, died on the 30th October 1963 at The General Hospital, Nottingham. Probate was granted to Pamela Nohre, wife of Lennart Nohre. https://probatesearch.service.gov.uk/Calendar?surname=Mears&yearOfDeath=1963#calendar

Cheers,
Peter

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...