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Pte. John Reid, 1369, 6 Gordon Highlanders: Cause of death? Was it caused by frost bite?


rolt968
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This is part of John Reid's death certificate (scotlandspeople);

1913315837_JohnReidforGWF.jpg.12615d30cf2c0dec7c7661db444d0b72.jpg

A Lance Corporal John Reid, 6 Gordon Highlanders was reported in a number of newspapers in late Febrauary 1915 as having severe frostbite. Could this be the same man, i.e. the conditions might result from frost bite?

RM

Edited by rolt968
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  • rolt968 changed the title to Pte. John Reid, 1369, 6 Gordon Highlanders: Cause of death? Was it caused by frost bite?

Hi RM

1369 John Reid was only a Private and only 17 and from Upper Farmton Lynturk and the Corporal was from St Cyrus.

 

Gary

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One for @Dai Bach y Sowldiwr I think. Doesn't it say Pyrexia as in Trench Fever?

I note that a J Reid, 1369 Gordons(TF) appears in the Daily Casualty List of 12/4/15 as wounded, report recieved 25/3/15

charlie

 

Courtesy FindmyPast

1294067988_GWFReidJCasListApr1915.JPG.f62b07cd0efb3ea431537199071afb50.JPG

Edited by charlie962
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11 minutes ago, charlie962 said:

One for @Dai Bach y Sowldiwr I think. Doesn't it say Pyrexia as in Trench Fever?

I note that a J Reid, 1369 Gordons(TF) appears in the Daily Casualty List of 12/4/15 as wounded, report recieved 25/3/15

charlie

 

Courtesy FindmyPast

1294067988_GWFReidJCasListApr1915.JPG.f62b07cd0efb3ea431537199071afb50.JPG

Careless of me. I should have checked that. He's in the Daily Casualty List of 12 April 1915 as wounded.

This is one of the reports of the John Reid with frost bite (Evening Telgraph 23 February 1915):

1480028117_EveningTele23Feb1915.jpg.77622ee04395c36b82ee1e32ed849814.jpg

RM

 

 

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33 minutes ago, dundeesown said:

Hi RM

1369 John Reid was only a Private and only 17 and from Upper Farmton Lynturk and the Corporal was from St Cyrus.

 

Gary

The St Cyrus John Reid is a bit of a mystery to me at the moment. It doesn't say that he came from there in the sense of being born or having family there.  Howver I do agree that he is unlikely to be 1369.

Incidentally John Reid 1369 was an original 1/6 Gordon Highlander going to France on 10 November 1914, under age.

RM

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I suspect that the L/Cpl John Reid must have been 1288, also an original 1/6 Gordon Highlander. He was later 67681, 178 Coy MGC. (A very informative MICR -ancestry).

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  • 3 weeks later...
On 17/09/2021 at 10:22, FROGSMILE said:

Yes it’s not really unusual.  There were two types of band at that time, Staff Bands and Regimental Bands.  The former were ‘around’ 50 strong and the latter around 37 (figures from memory).  All the Foot Guards regiments had Staff Bands.  The men in these bands did not join as soldiers, but as musicians/bandsmen and on entirely different terms and conditions of service.  Some joined as boy entrants in accordance with the school leaving age (not infrequently the son’s of bandsmen), and others were orphans from industrial schools where they had already learned music.  Others joined as young adults.  Once in the band the vast majority seemed to stay for life.  In addition to playing music at regimental events, bands with battalions stationed ‘at home’ (in Britain) maintained a full programme of public events and would often be seen on Sundays especially playing concerts in municipal bandstands.  High standards were maintained via courses of instruction at the Army’s school of music in Kneller Hall and only those of the best quality were assigned to the Staff Bands.  Those who showed special talent were sent on the Bandmaster, or Director of Music course at the school and, once qualified, they could apply for vacant positions in other regiments.  In this way it was not uncommon for such men to serve with as many as three different bands in the very latter part of their service.  On operations and if deployed the bands would generally alternate between acting as unit bearers, to assist with stretcher carrying, and playing music to keep up morale.  In the case of the Foot Guards some bands containing younger men were sent on service whereas those maintained in London, Windsor and elsewhere for public duties were comprised largely of older reservists and men unfit for front line service.  For a long time the Foot Guards operated a system of shorter service with the colours and a longer term on the reserve in comparison with their line regiment counterparts where the balance was reversed.  This meant that on the outbreak of war the Guards had a larger than usual regular reserve to call upon, including some musicians.

 

On 02/09/2021 at 12:28, rolt968 said:

This is part of John Reid's death certificate (scotlandspeople);

1913315837_JohnReidforGWF.jpg.12615d30cf2c0dec7c7661db444d0b72.jpg

A Lance Corporal John Reid, 6 Gordon Highlanders was reported in a number of newspapers in late Febrauary 1915 as having severe frostbite. Could this be the same man, i.e. the conditions might result from frost bite?

RM

I  read this as:

Extra Articular (outside of the joint)

Abscess of knee

Pyaemia (blood poisoning (septicaemia) caused by the spread in the bloodstream of pus-forming bacteria released from an abscess).

No reference to frost bite

OOPs

sorry ignore the 1st part of the above

incorporated from another thread in error!!

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