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Curious CWGC headstone……


Laird of Camster
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Curious CWGC headstone in a small church yard in St Asaph Denbighshire North Wales.

30604 Private Edward Kenny Royal Defence Corps died 10th February 1919.

His parents Patrick and Jane are listed on the CWGC site as being from St Asaph. He also appears on the St Asaph cenotaph.

He is documented as being in the 318th Protection Company.

Have done a little research, as I’d never heard of the Royal Defence Corps before.
 

It would appear that Edward wasn’t fit for overseas service. Whether that be due to age or medical conditions is anyone’s guess.

His date of death being 1919, I wondered whether he died of influenza? 
 

Would be interested to know where the 318th were stationed and what their role  was. Kinmel Camp is only a short distance away, did they perhaps have something to do with that? 

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986887EE-85C6-4224-B3B8-9BD8AAD2CC47.jpeg

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The 318th (Protection) Company of the Royal Defence Corps are recorded as guarding Number 13 National Filling Factory, the Munitions Works at White Lund, near Morecambe. The unit served under the orders of the Western Command.

Some info on the works here:

https://lahs.archaeologyuk.org/Contrebis/Churchill Munitions WEB.pdf

Dave

Edited by HERITAGE PLUS
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.......... 47 at time of death.  Looks to me like he might have prior service in 1893 as R.F/4190 Pte Edward Kenny, Royal Welsh Fusiliers.  

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10 hours ago, TullochArd said:

.......... 47 at time of death.  Looks to me like he might have prior service in 1893 as R.F/4190 Pte Edward Kenny, Royal Welsh Fusiliers.  

He certainly appears to have had an eventful military career….

On 29th December 1893, Edward Kennyenlisted into 2n Battalion of The Royal Welsh Fusiliers at Wrexham, his  regimental number was 4190. He served at Home until 23rd November 1894, India from 24th November 1894 until 9th December 1897 ( 3years 16days) Home from 10th December 1897  until 29th November 1898, China from 30th November 1898 until 1st July 1901 (2years 214 days), Home from 2nd July 1901 until 26th August 1901, South Africa from 27th August 1901 until 11th September 1902,(1 year 66 days) Home 12th September 1902 until 8th December 1905 when he was demobbed after serving for twelve years.

Edward was wounded on July 13th 1900 during 2nd Battalion’s engagement in The Relief of Tientsin.

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10 hours ago, ss002d6252 said:

He died of Pneumonia at  Seaforth Military Hospital, Liverpool. I assume that this pneumonia was as a result of Spanish Flu that was ravaging the world at the time?

11 hours ago, HERITAGE PLUS said:

The 318th (Protection) Company of the Royal Defence Corps are recorded as guarding Number 13 National Filling Factory, the Munitions Works at White Lund, near Morecambe. The unit served under the orders of the Western Command.

Some info on the works here:

https://lahs.archaeologyuk.org/Contrebis/Churchill Munitions WEB.pdf

Dave

Curious that he died in Liverpool? Unless of course there was a specific Influenza hospital in Liverpool at the time? 

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28 minutes ago, Laird of Camster said:

He died of Pneumonia at  Seaforth Military Hospital, Liverpool. I assume that this pneumonia was as a result of Spanish Flu that was ravaging the world at the time?

A reasonable assumption.

But without documentary evidence, it is only speculation.

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22 minutes ago, Dai Bach y Sowldiwr said:

A reasonable assumption.

But without documentary evidence, it is only speculation.

...... indeed ....... The Denbighshire Free Press only confirms as Double Pneumonia.

Death-Report.-Denbighshire-Free-Press-15-Sep-1919.jpg

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Curious that he died in Liverpool? Unless of course there was a specific Influenza hospital in Liverpool at the time? 

Seaforth Military Hospital was located within Seaforth Barracks (with an Annex in Beach Road) and was one of the hospitals providing treatment for men in Western Command. 

 

Dave

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