Jump to content
The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

What Regiments Came from Croydon, Surrey?


AgentAlf
 Share

Recommended Posts

My Gt Grandfather Walter Tarrant served in WW1. See the picture below of him in uniform. I would like to discover what regiment he was with. He lived in Croydon, Surrey and would have volunteered from there, and was clearly older being born in 1882. Can anyone suggest where to find what regiment or military records please?

14939554_10210038531455077_3821981493199398112_o.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Admin
1 hour ago, AgentAlf said:

My Gt Grandfather Walter Tarrant served in WW1. See the picture below of him in uniform. I would like to discover what regiment he was with. He lived in Croydon, Surrey and would have volunteered from there, and was clearly older being born in 1882. Can anyone suggest where to find what regiment or military records please?

14939554_10210038531455077_3821981493199398112_o.jpg

Did he have any middle names ?

Craig

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The local regiment was the Queen’s (Royal West Surrey) Regiment.

56859F1E-D9FB-435F-B37C-6A6135825D45.jpeg

Edited by FROGSMILE
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Admin

The Surrey Recruitment Registers have a Walter Tarrant, b.1882 in Norwood, a scaffolder attesting on 29 May 1915 at Croydon and enlisting in the 19th Bn The Middlesex Regiment.  Is that him?  Although indistinct at first glance the shoulder title appears more appropriate to the Middlesex rather than the Queen's. but Frogsmile can sort that one out

His original number appears to be 3316, later transferring to the Labour Corps 223845.  He was awarded the British War Medal and Victory Medal, interestingly the men around him on the Labour  Corps Roll are all from Southern Command Regiments, e.g. Kent, Surrey, Middlesex.

The Battalion was also known as the 2nd Public Works Battalion and they were recruited and served as Pioneers.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

He could easily be Middlesex Regiment going by curved shape of shoulder title (obscure though it is) and ending up in a Southern Command unit would be typical I think.

Edited by FROGSMILE
Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 minutes ago, kenf48 said:

The Surrey Recruitment Registers have a Walter Tarrant, b.1882 in Norwood, a scaffolder attesting on 29 May 1915 at Croydon and enlisting in the 19th Bn The Middlesex Regiment.  Is that him?  Although indistinct at first glance the shoulder title appears more appropriate to the Middlesex rather than the Queen's. but Frogsmile can sort that one out

His original number appears to be 3316, later transferring to the Labour Corps 223845.  He was awarded the British War Medal and Victory Medal, interestingly the men around him on the Labour  Corps Roll are all from Southern Command Regiments, e.g. Kent, Surrey, Middlesex.

The Battalion was also known as the 2nd Public Works Battalion and they were recruited and served as Pioneers.

That does sound like him, thats amazing, thanks. Where did you fine it so quickly, Ive been searching for ages...

1 hour ago, ss002d6252 said:

Did he have any middle names ?

Craig

No I don't think he had a middle name, see the tread, I think he's been found thanks so much.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

23 minutes ago, kenf48 said:

The Surrey Recruitment Registers have a Walter Tarrant, b.1882 in Norwood, a scaffolder attesting on 29 May 1915 at Croydon and enlisting in the 19th Bn The Middlesex Regiment.  Is that him?  Although indistinct at first glance the shoulder title appears more appropriate to the Middlesex rather than the Queen's. but Frogsmile can sort that one out

His original number appears to be 3316, later transferring to the Labour Corps 223845.  He was awarded the British War Medal and Victory Medal, interestingly the men around him on the Labour  Corps Roll are all from Southern Command Regiments, e.g. Kent, Surrey, Middlesex.

The Battalion was also known as the 2nd Public Works Battalion and they were recruited and served as Pioneers.

Do you know where they served possibly?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Admin

You can download the war diaries free of charge from the National Archives Website after you register. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Admin
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here’s the link to the war diary mentioned by Michelle, but you will need to register: https://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/C7354349

Edited by FROGSMILE
Link to comment
Share on other sites

A key date will be when he transferred to the Labour Corps – although it did not come into existence until after the 19th Battalion Middlesex Regiment had gone to France in 1916.

A quick search of nearby Labour Corps service numbers looking for surviving records brings up:-

223837 George Knight was formerly 12019 East Surrey Regiment. (MiC) No surviving service records.

223838 Patrick Brown was formerly 12314 East Surrey Regiment. (MiC) No surviving service records. He has some very limited Pension Records. He was in Italy in January 1918, (although the medical report is then dated 12th November 1917), when he was admitted to Hospital with Bronchitis.

223839 James Edward Ruimsby was formerly 8115 East Surrey Regiment. (MiC) No surviving service records. James was killed in action on the 4th August 1918. His entry on Soldiers Died in the Great War, (an HMSO publication from the early 1920’s) and his webpage on the Commonwealth War Graves Commission website shows his surname as Rumsby. SDGW adds that he was Killed in Action. CWGC records that he was serving with the 238th Employment Coy. (attd. 122nd Inf. Bde.) Labour Corps. He was buried at Lijssenthoek in Belgium. https://www.cwgc.org/find-records/find-war-dead/casualty-details/147336/JAMES EDWARD RUMSBY/

223840 Patrick White was formerly 12767 East Surrey Regiment. (MiC). Has surviving discharge records. Originally with the 3rd Battalion East Surrey Regiment, went out to France with the 12th Battalion. He was transferred to the 238 Employment Company, Labour Corps, on the 14th June 1917. His new number was 223840. Private White was admitted to 24 Casualty Clearing Station on the 20th October 1917 with Neurasthenia and by the 1st November 1917 he was in hospital at Wimereux. He was medically evacuated to the UK on the 10th November 1917 – after which I suspect there will be no similarity with the Army career of your great grandfather.

223841 Joseph Woolley was formerly 1490 Middlesex Regiment. Subsequently 348305 then WR281625 Royal Engineers. (MiC). No surviving service records.

223842 Percy S Enderby was formerly 3233 Middlesex Regiment. (MiC). No surviving service records.

223843 Henry Good was formerly 3271 Middlesex Regiment. (MiC). No surviving service records.

223844 Thomas Crockett was formerly 2184 Middlesex Regiment. (MiC). No surviving service records.

223845 Walter Tarrant.

223846 Sydney Creasy was formerly G/11618 Middlesex Regiment. (MiC). No surviving service records

223847 James W Thompson was formerly 744 East Yorkshire Regiment. (MiC). No surviving service records. However the MiC may be in error as there are surviving discharge records for a 223847 Edward Fry whose last unit was the 238 Divisional Employment Company, Labour Corps. He was medically examined at Cologne on the 23rd April 1919 prior to discharge. His original unit was the 10th Royal West Kent Regiment with the service number G/9268. (Although his statement of service shows 9th then 12th).

223848 Edley Cutler was formerly 6226 Royal West Kent Regiment. (MiC). No surviving service records

223849 Leonard Stone was formerly 7499 Middlesex Regiment. (MiC). No surviving service records.

223850 No match for MiC or surviving service records.

223851 Robert A Young was formerly 19955 Royal Fusiliers. (MiC). No surviving service records.

223852 Alfred Stent was formerly 18374 Royal Fusiliers. (MiC). Has surviving discharge  records, but they are very confusing as odd pages for two other men have slipped in. On his statement as to disability form he states he was in France and Italy, serving overseas from May 5th 1916 to 17th January 1919. He was Infantry to 1918 then Labour. He had heart trouble in March 1918 and was seen at 29 Clearing Station, Italy. However his Casualty Form Active Service shows he was transferred to No.238 Employment Company, Labour Corps on the 14th June 1917. He was posted to 273 Area Employment Company on the 9th March 1918.

So a small sample but if what it reveals hold true, then Walter Tranter was probably transferred to the Labour Corps on the 14th June 1917 while still in France with the the 19th Battalion, Middlesex Regiment.

The Pioneer Battalions were made up of men who were medically graded as fit to fight, although not in the highest categories. Looking at the men transferred to the Labour Corps it looks like their fitness standard may have dropped while undergoing the rigours of serving in and around the front line, and they were now at a level where they were deemed fit for overseas service but not frontline service. Where an age can be ascertained, the individuals in the sample above were in their mid to late thirties.

Having been transferred to the Labour Corps it seems most likely they went to the 238 Employment Company. I suspect they didn’t have to move too far.

The Long, Long Trail webpage linked to above by Michelle tells us:-

19th (Service) Battalion (2nd Public Works Pioneers)
Formed in London in April 1915 by Lt-Col. John Ward MP. Moved to Hornsey.
July 1915 : moved to Aldershot and came under command of 41st Division as Pioneer Battalion.
2 May 1916 : landed at Le Havre.
November 1917 : moved with the Division to Italy but returned to France in March 1918.

https://www.longlongtrail.co.uk/army/regiments-and-corps/the-british-infantry-regiments-of-1914-1918/the-duke-of-cambridges-own-middlesex-regiment/

The 41st Division included the 122nd Brigade. (223839 James Edward Ruimsby was serving with the 238th Employment Coy. (attd. 122nd Inf. Bde.) Labour Corps in Belgium when he died on the 4th August 1918). “on 12 January the Division took over the left section of the Cologne bridgehead.Demobilisation began; on 15 March the Division was retitled as the London Division”. (The discharge medical for 223847 Edward Fry took place at Cologne in April 1919).

223852 Alfred Stent and 223838 Patrick Brown both have references to service in Italy in the right period.

The 41st Division included battalions of the East Surrey Regiment, (12th), the Royal West Kent Regiment, (10th & 11th) and the Royal Fusiliers, (26th & 32nd). http://www.longlongtrail.co.uk/army/order-of-battle-of-divisions/41st-division/

Of course what can’t be known at this stage is if Walter Tarrant remained with 238th Employment Company for the rest of his time in the Army.

@FROGSMILEhas posted a link for the 19th Battalion, Middlesex Regiment, which covers up until they went to Italy, (war diaries for units serving in Italy are not currently digitised). Fortunately in this instance the transfer of Walter Tarrant would have occurred before then.

I’m not seeing a National Archive catalogue listing for the 238th Employment Company War Diary. They may get a reference in the 41st Divisional War Diaries, possibly in the diary of the Commander Royal Engineers (CRE) for the Division but almost certainly Walter won’t get a mention by name.

So you may be looking at a source like the Absent Voters Lists for 1918 & 1919 to track down his unit – see here for a guide on how it might help. https://www.longlongtrail.co.uk/soldiers/how-to-research-a-soldier/finding-soldiers-through-the-1918-absent-voters-lists/

More of a long shot, but if Walter and his wife had any children during the period he was most likely serving, then fathers’ occupation on the birth certificate may give a clue as to the unit being served with.

Hope some of that helps,
Peter

Edited by PRC
Typo
Link to comment
Share on other sites

32 minutes ago, PRC said:

A key date will be when he transferred to the Labour Corps – although it did not come into existence until after the 19th Battalion Middlesex Regiment had gone to France in 1916.

A quick search of nearby Labour Corps service numbers looking for surviving records brings up:-

223837 George Knight was formerly 12019 East Surrey Regiment. (MiC) No surviving service records.

223838 Patrick Brown was formerly 12314 East Surrey Regiment. (MiC) No surviving service records. He has some very limited Pension Records. He was in Italy in January 1918, (although the medical report is then dated 12th November 1917), when he was admitted to Hospital with Bronchitis.

223839 James Edward Ruimsby was formerly 8115 East Surrey Regiment. (MiC) No surviving service records. James was killed in action on the 4th August 1918. His entry on Soldiers Died in the Great War, (an HMSO publication from the early 1920’s) and his webpage on the Commonwealth War Graves Commission website shows his surname as Rumsby. SDGW adds that he was Killed in Action. CWGC records that he was serving with the 238th Employment Coy. (attd. 122nd Inf. Bde.) Labour Corps. He was buried at Lijssenthoek in Belgium. https://www.cwgc.org/find-records/find-war-dead/casualty-details/147336/JAMES EDWARD RUMSBY/

223840 Patrick White was formerly 12767 East Surrey Regiment. (MiC). Has surviving discharge records. Originally with the 3rd Battalion East Surrey Regiment, went out to France with the 12th Battalion. He was transferred to the 238 Employment Company, Labour Corps, on the 14th June 1917. His new number was 223840. Private White was admitted to 24 Casualty Clearing Station on the 20th October 1917 with Neurasthenia and by the 1st November 1917 he was in hospital at Wimereux. He was medically evacuated to the UK on the 10th November 1917 – after which I suspect there will be no similarity with the Army career of your great grandfather.

223841 Joseph Woolley was formerly 1490 Middlesex Regiment. Subsequently 348305 then WR281625 Royal Engineers. (MiC). No surviving service records.

223842 Percy S Enderby was formerly 3233 Middlesex Regiment. (MiC). No surviving service records.

223843 Henry Good was formerly 3271 Middlesex Regiment. (MiC). No surviving service records.

223844 Thomas Crockett was formerly 2184 Middlesex Regiment. (MiC). No surviving service records.

223845 Walter Tarrant.

223846 Sydney Creasy was formerly G/11618 Middlesex Regiment. (MiC). No surviving service records

223847 James W Thompson was formerly 744 East Yorkshire Regiment. (MiC). No surviving service records. However the MiC may be in error as there are surviving discharge records for a 223847 Edward Fry whose last unit was the 238 Divisional Employment Company, Labour Corps. He was medically examined at Cologne on the 23rd April 1919 prior to discharge. His original unit was the 10th Royal West Kent Regiment with the service number G/9268. (Although his statement of service shows 9th then 12th).

223848 Edley Cutler was formerly 6226 Royal West Kent Regiment. (MiC). No surviving service records

223849 Leonard Stone was formerly 7499 Middlesex Regiment. (MiC). No surviving service records.

223850 No match for MiC or surviving service records.

223851 Robert A Young was formerly 19955 Royal Fusiliers. (MiC). No surviving service records.

223852 Alfred Stent was formerly 18374 Royal Fusiliers. (MiC). Has surviving discharge  records, but they are very confusing as odd pages for two other men have slipped in. On his statement as to disability form he states he was in France and Italy, serving overseas from May 5th 1916 to 17th January 1919. He was Infantry to 1918 then Labour. He had heart trouble in March 1918 and was seen at 29 Clearing Station, Italy. However his Casualty Form Active Service shows he was transferred to No.238 Employment Company, Labour Corps on the 14th June 1917. He was posted to 273 Area Employment Company on the 9th March 1918.

So a small sample but if what it reveals hold true, then Walter Tranter was probably transferred to the Labour Corps on the 14th June 1917 while still in France with the the 19th Battalion, Middlesex Regiment.

The Pioneer Battalions were made up of men who were medically graded as fit to fight, although not in the highest categories. Looking at the men transferred to the Labour Corps it looks like their fitness standard may have dropped while undergoing the rigours of serving in and around the front line, and they were now at a level where they were deemed fit for overseas service but not frontline service. Where an age can be ascertained, the individuals in the sample above were in their mid to late thirties.

Having been transferred to the Labour Corps it seems most likely they went to the 238 Employment Company. I suspect they didn’t have to move too far.

The Long, Long Trail webpage linked to above by Michelle tells us:-

19th (Service) Battalion (2nd Public Works Pioneers)
Formed in London in April 1915 by Lt-Col. John Ward MP. Moved to Hornsey.
July 1915 : moved to Aldershot and came under command of 41st Division as Pioneer Battalion.
2 May 1916 : landed at Le Havre.
November 1917 : moved with the Division to Italy but returned to France in March 1918.

https://www.longlongtrail.co.uk/army/regiments-and-corps/the-british-infantry-regiments-of-1914-1918/the-duke-of-cambridges-own-middlesex-regiment/

The 41st Division included the 122nd Brigade. (223839 James Edward Ruimsby was serving with the 238th Employment Coy. (attd. 122nd Inf. Bde.) Labour Corps in Belgium when he died on the 4th August 1918). “on 12 January the Division took over the left section of the Cologne bridgehead.Demobilisation began; on 15 March the Division was retitled as the London Division”. (The discharge medical for 223847 Edward Fry took place at Cologne in April 1919).

223852 Alfred Stent and 223838 Patrick Brown both have references to service in Italy in the right period.

The 41st Division included battalions of the East Surrey Regiment, (12th), the Royal West Kent Regiment, (10th & 11th) and the Royal Fusiliers, (26th & 32nd). http://www.longlongtrail.co.uk/army/order-of-battle-of-divisions/41st-division/

Of course what can’t be known at this stage is if Walter Tarrant remained with 238th Employment Company for the rest of his time in the Army.

@FROGSMILEhas posted a link for the 19th Battalion, Middlesex Regiment, which covers up until they went to Italy, (war diaries for units serving in Italy are not currently digitised). Fortunately in this instance the transfer of Walter Tarrant would have occurred before then.

I’m not seeing a National Archive catalogue listing for the 238th Employment Company War Diary. They may get a reference in the 41st Divisional War Diaries, possibly in the diary of the Commander Royal Engineers (CRE) for the Division but almost certainly Walter won’t get a mention by name.

So you may be looking at a source like the Absent Voters Lists for 1918 & 1919 to track down his unit – see here for a guide on how it might help. https://www.longlongtrail.co.uk/soldiers/how-to-research-a-soldier/finding-soldiers-through-the-1918-absent-voters-lists/

More of a long shot, but if Walter and his wife had any children during the period he was most likely serving, then fathers’ occupation on the birth certificate may give a clue as to the unit being served with.

Hope some of that helps,
Peter

Thanks Peter, Walter went to Italy. I have this card he sent to my grandmother. EDF9D25A-777D-4376-9FE0-5925F45E5BF3.jpeg.33f0b645039865587028b317cb7e625c.jpeg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 minutes ago, AgentAlf said:

Thanks Peter, Walter went to Italy. I have this card he sent to my grandmother. EDF9D25A-777D-4376-9FE0-5925F45E5BF3.jpeg.33f0b645039865587028b317cb7e625c.jpeg

I remember being told that he was gassed mildly. He was a scaffolder but trade. All fascinating stuff, thanks Peter. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Michelle Young said:

Thanks Michelle 19th reads:

19th (Service) Battalion (2nd Public Works Pioneers)
Formed in London in April 1915 by Lt-Col. John Ward MP. Moved to Hornsey.
July 1915 : moved to Aldershot and came under command of 41st Division as Pioneer Battalion.
2 May 1916 : landed at Le Havre.
November 1917 : moved with the Division to Italy but returned to France in March 1918.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The postcard would appear to show the year, 1917,  in Roman numerals with an artilleryman on the left and large artillery pieces in the background.  Not sure about the figure on the right @FROGSMILE may have a thought? Italian?

 

MaxD

 

PS Just noticed 19 Bn went to Italy in Nov 1917, note the feather in the distinctive headdress of the (thought to be) Italian soldier.  Doesn't quite add up with a transfer to the Labour Corps in 1917?

Edited by MaxD
Link to comment
Share on other sites

55 minutes ago, MaxD said:

The postcard would appear to show the year, 1917,  in Roman numerals with an artilleryman on the left and large artillery pieces in the background.  Not sure about the figure on the right @FROGSMILE may have a thought? Italian?

 

MaxD

 

PS Just noticed 19 Bn went to Italy in Nov 1917, note the feather in the distinctive headdress of the (thought to be) Italian soldier.  Doesn't quite add up with a transfer to the Labour Corps in 1917?

Yes Max, the other figure is an Italian soldier of the Alpini (Alpine trained mountain troops).  They were some of the best trained and equipped Italian military.

EB394690-68C8-4167-A8BB-3B29CDCC28D6.png

Edited by FROGSMILE
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you for the confirmation Frogsmile!  Perhaps a generic card as a souvenir of the British arriving in Italy

No Labour No Battle has a section on Italy showing that although fighting troops did not arrive until Nov 1917, some Labour Corps units had been there since Jun 1917.  Others were brought with the Nov 1917 troops so it is entirely possible that he went, not with 19 Middx but with the Labour Corps if indeed he transferred in mid 1917.

MaxD

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Admin
1 hour ago, MaxD said:

PS Just noticed 19 Bn went to Italy in Nov 1917, note the feather in the distinctive headdress of the (thought to be) Italian soldier.  Doesn't quite add up with a transfer to the Labour Corps in 1917?

The ORBAT for the Italy Campaign on the LLT lists two Area Employment Companies, the one in XIV Corps is named as '273'; unfortunately the one in XI Corps is not named; and three Companies were engaged in Line of Communications. He could therefore have gone to Italy with the LC, and it appears 238 Company was there, see service record 223852 Stent as found by Peter above.

5 minutes ago, MaxD said:

No Labour No Battle has a section on Italy showing that although fighting troops did not arrive until Nov 1917, some Labour Corps units had been there since Jun 1917. 

we crossed

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Admin
6 hours ago, AgentAlf said:

That does sound like him, thats amazing, thanks. Where did you fine it so quickly, Ive been searching for ages...

Surrey Recruitment Registers on Find My Past (subscription required) or may be accessible through your local library service.

You may also be interested in 'Croydon in the Great War' pub 1920 free to download at

https://archive.org/details/croydongreatwaro00moor/page/n3/mode/2up

Although it concentrates on the Queen's (RWS) as the home Regiment it paints a picture of recruitment and what Walter's' wife was experiencing at home.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

No Labour No Battle cites as being in Italy before the Corps arrived in Nov 1917 as 196 Coy in Jun 1917, 172 Coy Sep 1917 ,16 Coy in Nov 1917.  As kenf48 has noted, 273 Coy with XI Corps on arrival and a locally numbered coy with XIV Corps.  1034 Coy formed in Oct 1918 - all these in the north.

 

MaxD

Edited by MaxD
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Brief summary of my earlier post - I think there is a very good chance that Walter Tarrant went to 238th Employment Company, Labour Corps on the 14th June 1917 in France.

While so far I can't confirm he stayed with that unit, also described as a Divisional Employment Company, for the remainder of the war, is it possible from sources like No Labour, No Battle to confirm:-

  • 223845 came from the number range initially allocated to 238th Employment Company
  • That the unit formed in France on or about the 14th June 1917.
  • That it was the Divisional Employment Company for the 41st Division at the time of it's creation.
  • It remained associated with the 41st Division all the way through to the Army of Occupation in 1919.

I believe those four statements are probably true but from the small sample of service numbers looked at there is not enough firm evidence, only hints.

Cheers
Peter

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Alf, the following is the basic information regarding employment companies, as explained in the excellent  “Long Long Trail” (LLT) adjunct to this website:

“The Officer Commanding each Employment Company was to maintain a list of men, categorised into the forms of employment for which they were best suited:”

“Batman

Cook

Storeman or Caretaker

Sanitary Duty

Orderly

Clerk

Tailor

Shoemaker

Policeman

Butcher

Regimental Institute

Salvage

Loader and Brakesman

Bath and Drying Room

Laundry

Traffic Control

Telephone Operator.”

“The companies took over this wide variety of work once they had been established.“

“The Divisional Employment Companies each came under command of the headquarters of a Division, who in turn might appoint them to a Brigade HQ.

NB.  A scaffolder would have had some useful life skills for living in the field and making the best of nearby resources.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, MaxD said:

The postcard would appear to show the year, 1917,  in Roman numerals with an artilleryman on the left and large artillery pieces in the background.  Not sure about the figure on the right @FROGSMILE may have a thought? Italian?

 

MaxD

 

PS Just noticed 19 Bn went to Italy in Nov 1917, note the feather in the distinctive headdress of the (thought to be) Italian soldier.  Doesn't quite add up with a transfer to the Labour Corps in 1917?

Thanks. If you see Michelle’s post a division of Pioneers did go to Italy in 1917. 

4 hours ago, FROGSMILE said:

Alf, the following is the basic information regarding employment companies, as explained in the excellent  “Long Long Trail” (LLT) adjunct to this website:

“The Officer Commanding each Employment Company was to maintain a list of men, categorised into the forms of employment for which they were best suited:”

“Batman

Cook

Storeman or Caretaker

Sanitary Duty

Orderly

Clerk

Tailor

Shoemaker

Policeman

Butcher

Regimental Institute

Salvage

Loader and Brakesman

Bath and Drying Room

Laundry

Traffic Control

Telephone Operator.”

“The companies took over this wide variety of work once they had been established.“

“The Divisional Employment Companies each came under command of the headquarters of a Division, who in turn might appoint them to a Brigade HQ.

NB.  A scaffolder would have had some useful life skills for living in the field and making the best of nearby resources.

Thanks Frogy, a picture forms quickly from everyone’s insights. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...