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Remembered Today:

Mother - "Capacity to earn impaired half"


Matlock1418
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Probably another one for Craig @ss002d6252 - but all welcome to post.

1224778463_Mother-capacitytoearnimpairedhalf.png.8a8dcf074e3f5886b7d7348ffb25b524.png

This phrase has been seen on a fatal casualty's dependant's [mother's] Article 21 pension claim [In 1916 she was awarded 4/- pw but in 1918 was at 12/6 pw but it later varied in several times in quantum]

1789145901_Mother-capacitytoearnimpairedhalf(2).png.e0f74ace7d9fba63bf3d3087c038b74b.png

Images courtesy of WFA/Fold3 - Source/Casualty: Pte. Ernest Louis DONLON, 9290, South Staffordshire Regiment.

Please can it be explained more fully what it probably meant for her/its implication for her pension claim.

Would she have been required to put in repeated claims and/or or would she have to be periodically assessed? [and how - where and who might make these potential impairment assessments?  How graded?  Was there an agreed scale of impairment for a dependant, perhaps in the same way a soldier's disability might be assigned a % disablement that could vary over time?]

Also how would such a situation be then handled by the MoP? [or might that have originally have been the LWPC?]

How would her condition impact on the quanta of her pension payments?  Perhaps up if more impaired or down if less impaired?? Was there an agreed scale based on grade of impairment?

Note: on another claim/a different mother I have seen "impaired three-quarters" was noted - so such conditions clearly had some important relevance.

???

:-) M

Edited by Matlock1418
typo
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I reckon it means his capacity to earn a living outside the army was impaired by 50%. The pension awarded would depend on the percentage.

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1 hour ago, museumtom said:

I reckon it means his capacity to earn a living outside the army was impaired by 50%.

Tom,

Thanks for your thoughts.  Seems likely you were probably lead astray by my original typo of his surname [inexcusable on my part] - now corrected above. I do apologise.

It doesn't seem to be his capacity that was the issue here - he was dead.  [Though certainly % disability would affect a pension awarded to a man claiming a disability pension].

It is his mother who is claiming because of his death. She seems the one half impaired.  I'm rather presuming this would affect [enhance?] her pension. Certainly the later quanta do seem larger than many other such dependant's Art. 21 awards I have seen on the pension cards.

But how affect and how dealt with seem the questions to me.

:-) M

Edited by Matlock1418
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Hello Matlock.

It'll all rocket science to me to be honest, and very confusing. I look forward to anyone who can help to clarify.

Kind regards.

Tom.

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Check the 1911 census to see if she had an impairment?

TEW

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Check 1911 census, See if they are at the sme adress and what they gave as occupation.

It sounds to me that they had a small enterprise between them and his death meant she lost half her potential earnings 

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1 hour ago, TEW said:

Check the 1911 census to see if she had an impairment?

Thanks for this suggestion

Mother - same address as on pension claim [Horsebrook Lane, Brewood, Staffordshire] = Fanny Donlon [family surname transcribed as "Donton" by Ancestry!] - No impairment recorded

58 minutes ago, johnboy said:

Check 1911 census, See if they are at the sme adress and what they gave as occupation.

Living with husband and extended family

She is a married woman (56) - no occupation recorded.

Ernest Donlon (15) - Errand Boy.

Husband and father - Thomas Donlon (68) - Farm Labourer.

1 hour ago, johnboy said:

It sounds to me that they had a small enterprise between them and his death meant she lost half her potential earnings

???

:-) M

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  • Admin

As a dependant parent Article 21 considered things such as self-support.

In the 1919 RW but earlier warrants had similar provisions.

image.png

 

The impairment to earnings is based on the mother's earning power.

Craig

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2 hours ago, Matlock1418 said:

Living with husband and extended family

She is a married woman (56) - no occupation recorded.

Ernest Donlon (15) - Errand Boy.

Husband and father - Thomas Donlon (68) - Farm Labourer.

The surname and age of the husband seems to have changed several times over the various censuses from his earliest appearance in 1871, so I wouldn't take the 68 as gospel. The address, Horsebrook Lane, Brewood, Stafforshire, falls within the Cannock Civil Registration District.

I therefore suspect that it is his death just under 2 years later, at the age of 68 that was recorded in the Cannock District in the January to March quarter, (Q1), of 1913. There is no obvious Civil Probate entry.

So sounds like the mother might well have been financially dependant from before the outbreak of war.

Don't know if that helps,
Peter

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55 minutes ago, ss002d6252 said:

The impairment to earnings is based on the mother's earning power.

Thanks Craig for the RW quote - as I under stood it.

But was rather wondering if you knew how the level of impairment was assessed/quantified and how pension quantum was calculated & awarded - it seems to have varied over time for Mrs Donlon = ???

23 minutes ago, PRC said:

So sounds like the mother might well have been financially dependant from before the outbreak of war.

Might potentially have been the case as it does seem quite likely that his father had died.

Her impairment [condition] and general circumstances are however currently unknown.  Perhaps the 1921 Census will reveal more once it tis available ... in hope!

:-) M

 

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I've not as yet looked in to the inner workings but as a quick read up on it.

Pre 1917 RW the parent only had a pension if they'd had a Separation Allowance paid (up to 5s) and had an incapacity to self-support. If there was no incapacity there'd be  gratuity.

 From Sep 1917 the RW 1917 was varied to widen the scale of support, if need be, on a graduated scale. minimum 3d 6d per week.

Afterwards it was increased and tweaked by the various RWs.

As to the actual calculation I don't have the forms or anything to hand to show exactly how.

Craig

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3 hours ago, ss002d6252 said:

I've not as yet looked in to the inner workings but as a quick read up on it.

Thank Craig.

We wait in hope that the means of assessment of impairment and pension calculation turn up sometime.

:-) M

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