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hypo hood


Lammy
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Already obsolete by the time Girdwood was taking his images, these hoods were now being used on the training ground to give the infantry an idea of operating wearing a gas mask.

RT 727.jpg

RT 2558.jpg

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Glad this all got sorted. However I have seen this time and again. A person buys an item clearly suspect. Repro / fake or altered. They want item to be right so ask and get opinions that are not necessarily what they want t to read. So theory after theory are put forward to placate their own doubts / others comments. It’s something I’ve done and most collectors of new to game or buying something out of their comfort zone. If you have a doubt and apply theories you will never be happy with said item

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  • 2 weeks later...

Nothing wrong with theories or asking questions. WW1 being a newish area for me, having spent most of my life collecting third reich memorabilia. Helmets are my strong points , both ww1 and ww2. So coming across something rare or desirable , will lead to questions being asked , and theories being developed. Have had a few nice finds of the years , but also had my fingers burnt. It is all part of the learning process , that I would not be without today. 

My only flaw would be , not sticking with one subject. E.g. buttons , or just badges.

I collect it all , and I seem to be getting worse. But I enjoy the reading and new learning.

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  • 1 month later...

If I decided to start collecting items priced in 3 or 4 figures I'd make sure I became an "expert" PDQ, especially in a field as much faked as this one. Time and again I see obvious, and not so obvious, fakes being sold for sizeable sums and wonder who bought them and why didn't they do their research. Whilst it's not possible to know everything, it is possible to learn quite a lot in a short space of time and that's often enough to detect a fake. It's a simple matter to do an image search for the item in question and compare museum examples with those on sale; combine the search term with the words fake, repro etc; type in the name of a suspect dealer with the words fake, crook, etc. We're not allowed to publicly expose fakers on this forum for legal reasons but the information is out there just the same and it's not that hard to find with a bit of determination and ingenuity.

These are pretty basic precautions. An hour spent searching is surely well worth the effort in time, hassle and possibly money saved in the avoidance of a duff purchase.

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21 hours ago, wainfleet said:

If I decided to start collecting items priced in 3 or 4 figures I'd make sure I became an "expert" PDQ, especially in a field as much faked as this one. Time and again I see obvious, and not so obvious, fakes being sold for sizeable sums and wonder who bought them and why didn't they do their research.

Good post.

This mirrors what the late Michael Baldwin - author of the Feldzug series - used to say about collectors who complained about the price of books, like the Feldzug series**.

That they would baulk at paying £40 - £50 for a highly valuable research and knowledge tool, while happily, literally, gambling to the tune of hundreds or even thousands of pounds on spurious items from bent or stupid dealers for reasons of bare optimism and little else.

Sadly, there are even 'advanced' collectors out there in possession of loads of rubbish because they preferred to believe the person or story, rather than the object.

We always make mistakes, but forewarned is forearmed and £300 spent on Pollendine, Bodsworth*, Chambers, Haselgrove - even Chappell to an extent - et al will help avoid a lifetime of expensive disappointment. It won't eliminate it, but it'll certainly help minimise it.

Cheers,

GT.

*Actually, these days you might have to pay heavily for this volume alone (if you can find one), although the publishers do sell a PDF version still.

**Some of these volumes - 1914 and 1917 - are attracting hefty prices now too. 

The key learning here is: if you see a good book, buy it while you can.

 

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Wainfleet and Grovetown have nailed it here and in a polite way. The buy the object not the story was my point also and the fact that a series of theories were put forward to negate the obvious flaws is a bad thing. Books books, research including Google, fairs , contacts and buying from trusted sources saves pain and money. Bargains are out there but rare nowadays,.

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