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Remembered Today:

Open Letter of Thanks to PAL Derek Robertson


David_Bluestein

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An Open letter of thanks to PAL Derek Robertson for his efforts in reuniting a lost Memorial Plaque for me.

For those of you who don’t know Derek Robertson, he is an active member of this forum and operates a very good web site that works to unite lost Memorial Plaques. I have been fortunate to have met Derek through this forum over a year ago, and count him amongst my friends, even though we have never actually met in person.

Derek worked very hard to track me down last week and alert me of one of my ‘want-list’ plaques that had surfaced at a local auction. He found me in sunny Florida USA on business (and a little pleasure).

Derek went well above and beyond the call of duty on my behalf. He assisted me by bidding on the Memorial Plaque, and secured it for me at a reasonable cost!

I could not be more grateful and impressed by this gentleman. Derek you are a credit to this forum, and more over, a credit to the men whose memories you are working to keep alive through your work in reuniting Memorial Plaques. A kind thanks for all your good work, and kind help.

Regards

Your friend

David Bluestein

Canada

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Here are the medals to Alexander Cameron Lindsay. A young man of 19 years killed at Ypres in April 1915.

I purchased his medals from a collector in Melbourne Australia! His Memorial Plaque was discovered in England, and NOW all will be reunited in Canada.

Over three continents and countless decades, Alexander’s medals are now home.

I will post a photo of the united group once the plaque arrives.

_________________________________________________________________________

2462 Pte. Alexander Cameron Lindsay

1/9th Battalion (TF) Royal Scots

Alexander Lindsay was born at Edinburgh Scotland on August 18, 1895. He was the son the late William, a Clothier, and Jane Lindsay of 55 Montpelier Park Edinburgh. He was their only son.

Attended Bruntsfield Primary School, and later joined George Heriot's School, on September 27, 1904. He was a ‘Foundationer’, which meant that his fees were paid by the George Harriot's Trust Office, as his father was deceased. Member of the O.T.C Cadet program from 1909-1911, and an agricultural student. He left on July 13, 1911.

Lindsay joined the Royal Scots at Edinburgh on the outbreak of war in August 1914. Arriving with the unit in France in February 1915. The 9th served as a part of the 27th Division, 8th Brigade BEF.

Lindsay was engaged at the Second Battle of Ypres April 22, 1915 where his regiment was heavily involved. They were a member of the famous ‘Geddes Detachment’ that assisted in the attack on Mauser Ridge on April 23, 1915. The 9th Royal Scots are shown as suffering heavily in this assault, those who survived the initial action withdrew due to severe losses.

It was in this action that 19-year-old Alexander Cameron Lindsay was killed in action.

Du Ruvigny’s Memorial book records: ‘…was killed in action during the 2nd Battle of Ypres April 23, 1915, while helping a wounded school fellow after being twice wounded himself. Buried at St. Jean, two and half miles N.E. of Ypres.’

Despite being buried by his pals, Lindsay’s remains were not recovered after the war and his name is therefore commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial for the missing.

post-23-1110223932.jpg

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Extraordinary story. Well done again Derek. I can't wait to see the photo of the reunited group.

It gives me a warm feeling inside guys. Quite cheered me up after getting a really horrid car repair bill today. Put things in context.

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well done Derek!

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B) I'm blushing.
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I must echo David's sentiments 100%! I too have benefitted from Derek's efforts. Here in Canada, Derek has a real fan club!!!

Cheers,

Terry

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Here she is - a beautiful Acton plaque, batch 16 with a chocolate patina finish with just a slight rubbing in the raised parts.

She's obviously been in hiding for a good few years going by her condition.

I'm now leaving her in the tender mercy of the Post Office :blink:

post-23-1110286517.jpg

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Derek

You are a star!

And David - it is good that you have had this help, because you yourself have been helpful to me, and I'm sure to others on this forum.

Kate

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well done derek, hopefully me next! ;)

enoch

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Hi All, :)

Fantastic story. Congratulations to all involved.

Cheers

Tim.

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Derek,

Fantastic job, very nice to see the story and picture behind this gentleman David. Once again great job all around and heart warming to see them re-united.

Andy

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  • 2 weeks later...

Lovely stuff, David. Haven't you had some luck lately? Let us know when the other plaques arrive.

Cheers,

Terry

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Superb! :D

I wonder how they came to be seperated in the first place.

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