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Picture postcards needs translation


Moniek
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Hi everyone! I've joined this forum on recommendation from someone on Facebook, where I posted pictures of some picture postcards that I've bought on a street market years ago. The backs of them are written in cursive Early German and I can't make anything of it. I'm hoping someone on here might be able to help!

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Edited by Moniek
Forgot to tag, not sure if the post is in the right area (soldiers and regiments)
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The 5th picture says

Feuerstellung bei Lens

Sturm auf die

Lorettohöhe am 3.III.15

 

Firing position near Lens.

Charge on the Loretto Heights on 3.III.15

 

The 9th picture says

27. März 1917

Lieber Heinrich theile Dir

mit das es mir noch gut gehe,

welches ich von dir auch hoffen

werde. Das Wetter ist hier immer sehr

kalt, man dachte es wär in Frankreich

warmer wie in Deutschland aber nicht so.

Gruss auf ein frohliches Wiedersehen. Kan. Fritz (?)

Res. Art. Mun. Kol. 23 Deutsche Feldpost 207 (?)

 

17 March 1917. Dear Heinrich, letting you know that I am still doing well, and I will hope the same of you. The weather here is still very cold, one would think that France would be warmer than Germany but that isn't the case. Greetings and to a happy reunion. Kanonier Fritz (?), Reserve Artillerie Munitionskolonne 23, German Fieldpost station 207 (?)

 

For the sake of readability, it might help if you post the pictures with the text facing the right way.

 

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Oh wow thank you so much! I'll see if I can upload again but rotated!

 

*Unable to edit so I'll post rotated pictures here.

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Edited by Moniek
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1. Gradenitzatal

Probably refers to Gradenica. There is a city by this name in Croatia (and also a tiny village in Macedonia, but it has less than 100 people).

 

2. Could be "Auf der Morava" -- on the Morava, a river in the former Yugoslavia

 

3. Dated Budapest, 30.IX.1921 and sent from Geza Braune to Mr H Feenstra, Wilhelminastraat 33, Amsterdam, Holland but I can't read the message.

 

4. Sent from a Kriegslazarett (field hospital) to a family in Horn in Lippe. I can't read the place name that precedes the date.

 

. . . .den 8.6.18

Ihr Lieben!

Die herzlichsten Grüsse

sendet euch euer Neffe

Christian

Photographien schlecht gerieten

 

. . . .8.6.18

Dearest ones!

Your nephew Christian sends you warmest greetings. The photograph turned out badly.

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I can't believe how you translated this so quickly! Thank you so much, I'll write it down and keep it together with the photos. I'm so happy to finally know where they're from and what they say! There's two left, but I'm kind of giving up on those, if anyone can decipher that.. hats off! Thanks again a million!

Edited by Moniek
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26 minutes ago, knittinganddeath said:

1. Gradenitzatal

Probably refers to Gradenica. There is a city by this name in Croatia (and also a tiny village in Macedonia, but it has less than 100 people).

 

2. Could be "Auf der Morava" -- on the Morava, a river in the former Yugoslavia

 

3. Dated Budapest, 30.IX.1921 and sent from Geza Braune to Mr H Feenstra, Wilhelminastraat 33, Amsterdam, Holland but I can't read the message.

 

4. Sent from a Kriegslazarett (field hospital) to a family in Horn in Lippe. I can't read the place name that precedes the date.

 

. . . .den 8.6.18

Ihr Lieben!

Die herzlichsten Grüsse

sendet euch euer Neffe

Christian

Photographien schlecht gerieten

 

. . . .8.6.18

Dearest ones!

Your nephew Christian sends you warmest greetings. The photograph turned out badly.

Just a few corrections or remarks:

 

1. There's also Hradenytsi in Moldavia. However it should refer to a valley of the Gradenitza (river?).

2. Durch die Morava

4. A Kriegslazarett is not a field hospital but a clearing hospital in English. In this case it's Kriegslazarett 8 in Charleville.

 

Jan

 

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Thanks Jan! Was actually hoping you or GreyC would step into the thread :)

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If anyone would be able to shed some light on these last two, I'll come mow your lawn, walk your dog, wash your car, you name it 😂IMG_20210610_183426.jpg.4c88dc050e129fffeb6fca5fdb169683.jpgIMG_20210610_183347.jpg.b5b24143ae1adf88a493e6175f3286df.jpg

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The first one is addressed to Elisabeth Scholz, but I can't read the rest of the address.

 

den 11. Jul 1917

Liebe Schwester Lisbeth!

Theile dir mit, das ich

heute aus diesen Lazarett

wegkomme und zwar

komme ich jetzt in eine

Erholungsheim. Meine

neue Adresse und alles

andere theile ich dir

sofort von da aus mit.

In der Hoffnung das es

dir auch gut geht.

Grüsst dich herzlichst!

dein Bruder Paul!

Auf Wiedersehen!

 

11 July 1917

Dear Sister Lisbeth,

Letting you know that today I am getting out of the Lazarett and will now go to a rehabilitation centre/convalescent home. I will let you know my new address and everything else immediately from there. In the hope that you are also doing well. Many warm greetings! From your brother Paul! Goodbye/until we meet again!

 

I love his enthusiasm at the end with all those exclamation marks.

 

The second one looks like it is part of a longer letter.

 

schon wohnen. Hast du das

Haus mit Garten und Feld

in Lampertswalde schon gesehen

Ist es ein schönes Grundstück

oder ist es recht alt und bau-

fällig. Mir geht es sonst ganz

gut nur habe ich Halsentzündung (?)

zur Zeit und Kopfschmerzen.

Ich will nun schliessen und

dich vielmals herzlich grüssen.

In der Hoffnung das dich

die Karten gesund an

treffen. Dein Bruder Paul!

 

Have you seen the house with the garden and field in Lampertswalde? Is it a nice property or is it really old and dilapidated? I am doing quite well only I have a sore throat (?) at the moment and headache. I will finish now and send you many warm greetings. Hoping that the cards find you healthy. Your brother Paul!

 

In the address field he has written:

Auf gesundes Wiedersehen!

Bitte um baldige Antwort!

 

Andenken

von deinen

Lieber Bruder Paul!

1914-1918

10.IV.1918

 

To a healthy reunion! Please send an answer soon!

A souvenir from your dear brother Paul! 1914-1918 10.IV.1918

 

Edited by knittinganddeath
adding "stück" and "an" -- thanks GreyC!
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11 hours ago, knittinganddeath said:

The first one is addressed to Elisabeth Scholz, but I can't read the rest of the address

Miss Scholz was living at Promenade 25 in Oschatz , Saxony, I‘m not sure of the owner‘s forename but his/her surname was Obenaus.

Charlie

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10 minutes ago, charlie2 said:

I‘m not sure of the owner‘s forename

It is not a first name, it is the abbreviation of his profession Ingen(ieur) = Engineer.

D.

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17 minutes ago, GreyC said:

It is not a first name, it is the abbreviation of his profession Ingen(ieur) = Engineer.

D.

Thanks GreyC, I can see that now.

Charlie

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13 hours ago, knittinganddeath said:

The first one is addressed to Elisabeth Scholz, but I can't read the rest of the address.

 

den 11. Jul 1917

Liebe Schwester Lisbeth!

Theile dir mit, das ich

heute aus diesen Lazarett

wegkomme und zwar

komme ich jetzt in eine

Erholungsheim. Meine

neue Adresse und alles

andere theile ich dir

sofort von da aus mit.

In der Hoffnung das es

dir auch gut geht.

Grüsst dich herzlichst!

dein Bruder Paul!

Auf Wiedersehen!

 

11 July 1917

Dear Sister Lisbeth,

Letting you know that today I am getting out of the Lazarett and will now go to a rehabilitation centre/convalescent home. I will let you know my new address and everything else immediately from there. In the hope that you are also doing well. Many warm greetings! From your brother Paul! Goodbye!

 

I love his enthusiasm at the end with all those exclamation marks.

 

The second one looks like it is part of a longer letter.

 

schon wohnen. Hast du das

Haus mit Garten und Feld

in Lampertswalde schon gesehen

Ist es ein schönes Grund. . . .

oder ist es recht alt und bau-

fällig. Mir geht es sonst ganz

gut nur habe ich Halsentzündung (?)

zur Zeit und Kopfschmerzen.

Ich will nun schliessen und

dich vielmals herzlich grüssen.

In der Hoffnung das dich

die Karten gesund (?)

treffen. Dein Bruder Paul

 

Have you seen the house with the garden and field in Lamperswalde? Is it a nice . . . . or is it really old and dilapidated? I am doing quite well only I have a sore throat (?) at the moment and headaches. I will finish now and send you many warm greetings. Hoping that the cards find you healthy. Your brother Paul

 

In the address field he has written:

Auf gesundes Wiedersehen!

Bitte um baldige Antwort!

 

Andenken

von deinen

Lieber Bruder Paul

1914-1918

10.IV.1918

 

To a healthy reunion! Please send an answer soon!

A souvenir from your dear brother Paul 1914-1918 10.IV.1918

 


A superb skill to have and as always it’s been interesting to see you, Jan, GreyC and charlie2 bring this postcard from over 100 years ago alive.  Just one point I would venture is that I think in the context of the writer’s emotions I feel that a more literal translation of ‘auf wiedersehen’ - to say until we meet (or see each other) again - is perhaps more appropriate than goodbye and better conveys the feelings he seemingly intended.
Thanks to all posters.  I wonder if the families of these star crossed correspondents still exist in the same towns in Germany.

Edited by FROGSMILE
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45 minutes ago, FROGSMILE said:

A superb skill to have

As I live a bit far away and have 5 dogs I thought it prudent to let knittinganddeath translate the card otherwise Moniek might have had to renege on the offer to walk the dogs :)

seriously though I‘m only a learner with L plates front and rear and I‘m amazed how well knittinganddeath, AOK4, GreyC among others can read the old writing.

Charlie

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3 minutes ago, charlie2 said:

As I live a bit far away and have 5 dogs I thought it prudent to let knittinganddeath translate the card otherwise Moniek might have had to renege on the offer to walk the dogs :)

seriously though I‘m only a learner with L plates front and rear and I‘m amazed how well knittinganddeath, AOK4, GreyC among others can read the old writing.

Charlie

You need to define "far away" first 😂 I just might!

54 minutes ago, FROGSMILE said:


A superb skill to have and as always it’s been interesting to see you, Jan, GreyC and charlie2 bring this postcard from over 100 years ago alive.  Just one point I would venture is that I think in the context of the writer’s emotions I feel that a more literal translation of ‘auf wiedersehen’ - to say until we meet again - is perhaps more appropriate than goodbye and better conveys the feelings he seemingly intended.
Thanks to all posters.  I wonder if the families of these star crossed correspondents still exist in the same towns in Germany.

It is, doing just that! I would love to find out more about these people, their stories etc. I might try to research the needle in the haystack!

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16 hours ago, knittinganddeath said:

die Karten gesund (?)

16 hours ago, knittinganddeath said:

Ist es ein schönes Grund. . . .

1) an..

2)...stück

 

 

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17 hours ago, knittinganddeath said:

The first one is addressed to Elisabeth Scholz, but I can't read the rest of the address.

 

den 11. Jul 1917

Liebe Schwester Lisbeth!

Theile dir mit, das ich

heute aus diesen Lazarett

wegkomme und zwar

komme ich jetzt in eine

Erholungsheim. Meine

neue Adresse und alles

andere theile ich dir

sofort von da aus mit.

In der Hoffnung das es

dir auch gut geht.

Grüsst dich herzlichst!

dein Bruder Paul!

Auf Wiedersehen!

 

11 July 1917

Dear Sister Lisbeth,

Letting you know that today I am getting out of the Lazarett and will now go to a rehabilitation centre/convalescent home. I will let you know my new address and everything else immediately from there. In the hope that you are also doing well. Many warm greetings! From your brother Paul! Goodbye!

 

I love his enthusiasm at the end with all those exclamation marks.

 

The second one looks like it is part of a longer letter.

 

schon wohnen. Hast du das

Haus mit Garten und Feld

in Lampertswalde schon gesehen

Ist es ein schönes Grund. . . .

oder ist es recht alt und bau-

fällig. Mir geht es sonst ganz

gut nur habe ich Halsentzündung (?)

zur Zeit und Kopfschmerzen.

Ich will nun schliessen und

dich vielmals herzlich grüssen.

In der Hoffnung das dich

die Karten gesund (?)

treffen. Dein Bruder Paul

 

Have you seen the house with the garden and field in Lamperswalde? Is it a nice . . . . or is it really old and dilapidated? I am doing quite well only I have a sore throat (?) at the moment and headaches. I will finish now and send you many warm greetings. Hoping that the cards find you healthy. Your brother Paul

 

In the address field he has written:

Auf gesundes Wiedersehen!

Bitte um baldige Antwort!

 

Andenken

von deinen

Lieber Bruder Paul

1914-1918

10.IV.1918

 

To a healthy reunion! Please send an answer soon!

A souvenir from your dear brother Paul 1914-1918 10.IV.1918

 

This one interests me in particular, like you said it seems like part of a letter but the first part seems to be missing. The two different handwritings are odd as well. I have a vivid imagination.. would love to know the whole story of this one!

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1 hour ago, Moniek said:

This one interests me in particular

What puzzles me is that he writes to his sister (Liebe Schwester Lisbeth), whose surname is Scholz. That should imply that his surname is the same, normally. But, though his surname is hardly legible due to the stamp, it is clearly not "Scholz". However, I could manage to decipher most of the rest, which leads us to the hospital for infectious diseases at Inor near Stenay. So he suffered from an infectious disease. As it is the Western front, I guess it was the Ruhr (dysentery). What has also not yet been mentioned is that Paul was an Armierungssoldat, so he belonged to a battailon that was tasked with fortifying the emplacements. And last but not least, the hospital placed a stamp onto the card urging the addressee not to send food to the patient at the hospital.

GreyC

Edited by GreyC
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And you got all that, from the stamp and short info on that card?? I'm very impressed!

 

If Lisbeth would have been married, she'd have her husband's last name, no? 

 

I'm browsing your profiles and the knowledge you people have is just marvelous.. 

Edited by Moniek
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1 hour ago, GreyC said:

What puzzles me is that he writes to his sister (Liebe Schwester Lisbeth), whose surname is Scholz. That should imply that his surname is the same, normally. But, though his surname is hardly legible due to the stamp, it is clearly not "Scholz". However, I could manage to decipher most of the rest, which leads us to the hospital for infectious diseases at Inor near Stenay. So he suffered from an infectious disease. As it is the Western front, I guess it was the Ruhr (dysentery). What has also not yet been mentioned is that Paul was an Armierungssoldat, so he belonged to a battailon that was tasked with fortifying the emplacements. And last but not least, the hospital placed a stamp onto the card urging the addressee not to send food to the patient at the hospital.

GreyC

 

GreyC,

If his sister Elisabeth was married to man named Scholz, her name would have changed into Scholz, so it is not unusual for brother and sister to have different family names... I've tried to decipher his last name as well, but because of the two stamps, I can't read it.

There's a publication about the Seuchenlazarett Inor IIRC.

Jan

 

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8 hours ago, FROGSMILE said:

a more literal translation of auf wiedersehen to say until we meet again is more appropriate and conveys the feelings he seemingly intended.

Oh, I like that interpretation! I've been wondering why they often write that at the very end of their letters as it sounds so abrupt, but it makes much more sense to think of it literally, as you say.

 

 

13 hours ago, Moniek said:

thank you so much for sharing that!

You're welcome, it's my pleasure. I really love these glimpses into their lives.

 

 

5 minutes ago, Moniek said:

 

If Lisbeth would have been married, she'd have her husband's last name, no? 

Yes, but the card is addressed to Fräulein -- Miss. I guess it isn't impossible that she was recently married and he forgot, though.

 

Also -- two different handwritings from the same person is not uncommon. They'll often save their more legible writing for the address, but maybe Paul had enough time & quiet at the Lazarett to write the whole message at leisure in his "nice" script. The second card seems more rushed. He does love his exclamation marks regardless!

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4 minutes ago, knittinganddeath said:

Oh, I like that interpretation! I've been wondering why they often write that at the very end of their letters as it sounds so abrupt, but it makes much more sense to think of it literally, as you say.

 

 

You're welcome, it's my pleasure. I really love these glimpses into their lives.

 

 

Yes, but the card is addressed to Fräulein -- Miss. I guess it isn't impossible that she was recently married and he forgot, though.

Didn't think of that, you're right! Interesting!

 

4 minutes ago, knittinganddeath said:

 

Also -- two different handwritings from the same person is not uncommon. They'll often save their more legible writing for the address, but maybe Paul had enough time & quiet at the Lazarett to write the whole message at leisure in his "nice" script. The second card seems more rushed. He does love his exclamation marks regardless!

Yes he sure does 😁 cursive handwriting is s dying art nowadays but in some countries like Russia, Poland etc , kids are still taught cursive and their writings look so similar, I love it!

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59 minutes ago, AOK4 said:

If his sister Elisabeth was married to man named Scholz, her name would have changed into Scholz, so it is not unusual for brother and sister to have different family names

Jan,

may I direct your attention to the fact he addresses his sister as FRÄULEIN? =Unmarried woman (knittinganddeath also noticed that - thank you-). So it is unusual. Maybe a halfsister or one of them is illegitimate. But that´s speculative.

GreyC

Edited by GreyC
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