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Corps Identification Help please


joanbelge
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Please can anyone shed any light on the corps mentioned in question 16 ? the soldier is attesting in the West Yorkshire regiment. Thank youimage.png.86e79aad50d2a128f24d3d240b3b57ef.png

Edited by joanbelge
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I think that the first word might be an abbreviation ‘Pensr’ (as in Pensioner) and if that is correct it possibly refers to the small corps (as in ‘body’) of pensioner recruiters employed by the British Army at that time and for many years subsequently (now contracted out to CAPITA a civilian service provider).  
 

The pensioner recruiters were exclusively retired Army officers (who had risen from the ranks) and similarly retired senior non-commissioned officers and warrant officers, who were already in receipt of a military pension, and who thus only needed to be paid expenses and a bonus (fee) for each recruit that they processed.  
 

They were organised via the Army’s regional Command structure (Northern, Eastern, etc.), each of which was usually divided into two or three numbered districts.  Each district had a team of pensioner recruiters under a retired officer.  The rationale behind this structure is that old military men were both, wily and knew where to source recruits, as well as what kind of man would respond well to military training and service.  As mentioned they were paid by results.
 

During WW1 demand exceeded the supply of such recruiters and other men with public service experience were also taken on in the role of pensioner recruiters for the duration of the war. I am not sure what the second word is.

 

NB.  These pensioner recruiters were involved in serving notice as part of the system of conscription under the Military Service Act 1916 (and subsequent revisions).

Edited by FROGSMILE
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Thank you I had thought perhaps was penal something but your explanation makes more sense thank you

 

 

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31 minutes ago, joanbelge said:

Thank you I had thought perhaps was penal something but your explanation makes more sense thank you

 

 

I am glad to help.  The system of Paid ‘Pensioner Recruiters’ (PPR) existed for many years (until quite recently).

Edited by FROGSMILE
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The system occasionally appeared in debates in the House of Commons.  Here is one such example:

 

RE-ENLISTED PENSIONERS.

House of Commons Debate 19 November 1919 vol 121

 

Captain BOWYER 

asked the Secretary of State for War whether he will inquire into the case of the pension of Mr. G. W. Eales, late sergeant-major, Royal Regiment of Artillery; whether Mr. Eales left the service in 1912, after serving twenty-four years, seventeen of which were spent in India and Africa, including the defence of Ladysmith, and was granted a pension of 2s. 5d. a day; that in August, 1914, he tried to rejoin, but was rejected owing to circumstances partly caused by his long service abroad; that in September, 1914, he joined the staff of recruiters, and worked continuously until the end of 1918, under Army officers and Army discipline, and drawing Army pay; that during his two years of recruiting he raised upwards of 3,000 recruits; whether Mr. Eales, on application for the re-assessment of his pre-war pension, was informed that he was not entitled to any such increase, as he did not re-enlist; and whether, in view of this man's record before and during the War, and in view of the services he rendered on the staff of recruiters, he will issue instructions for the pension of this man to be re-assessed?

 

Mr. FORSTER 

I am afraid I cannot make any exception to the rule that only re-enlisted pensioners can have their pensions re-assessed.

 

NB.  This is particularly relevant because it makes clear that the PPR had civilian status and therefore did not accrue additions to their military pension. It’s often forgotten that the military service act (as revised 1918) also obliged military pensioners under 51 to reenlist for any military job that was decreed suitable for them (the idea being that the State should secure the benefit of their military experience given the expense of their pensions).  Those considered unfit were given roles in civilian status jobs in recruiting, pay and records offices.

Edited by FROGSMILE
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Fascinating stuff

 

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