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Remembered Today:

20976 George Brown 17th Sherwood Foresters


Emma W
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I am searching for the 17th (Service) Battalion (Welbeck Rangers) George Brown - service number 20976 and details of 21/10/1916 if anyone can help? Would love to know more of his time before being injured out that day. Many thanks

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  • Michelle Young changed the title to 20976 George Brown 17th Sherwood Foresters
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Welcome Emma. As you had posted on a very old thread, I’ve split this into a new post to hopefully get more attention,

Michelle 

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Hi and welcome to the forum

First take a look at the Long Long Trail site, Link at top of page, for research hints

image.png.2108c67e5027dc95fa4087d7b04d26ab.png

regards

Jon

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The War Diary on National Archives (free to download if registered at the mo)

Is HERE

Reference: WO 95/2587/2
Description:

17 Battalion Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment). War Diaries for December 1916 not included. Reported, April 2001

Date: 1916 Mar - 1918 Feb
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43 minutes ago, Emma W said:

details of 21/10/1916

If you subscribe to Ancestry the War Diary for that day is HERE, then you can scroll back or forth as needed

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On Ancestry the Medal Index Card is HERE

Just VM & BWM so no Star so didn't go abroad before 1/1/1916

Medal Roll HERE

Name: George Brown
Military Year: 1914-1920
Rank: Corporal
Company: WO 329
Regiment or Corps: Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment
Regiment Number: 2097 6
Medal Awarded: British War Medal and Victory Medal
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Hi Emma,

 

Welcome to the forum.

 

His October 1916 wounding appears to have been noted in a register (link) as being classified under wound class 'II  1'.

 

image.png.58024902992d7b3a47c82515aeabb83c.png

Image sourced from Findmypast

 

I wonder if he recovered from that wound, and was subsequently 'recycled' to another Battalion. The reason I say that is Fold3 appear to have a pension index card (link - get in quickly, as they are offering free access for literally the next day or so).  It indicates that following his discharge on 27.12.1919 he received a pension due to an assessed disability of 40% due to a wound to his right eye. It might be a clerical error but the card seems to suggest that he may have been with the 1st Battalion at the time of his wounding.

 

image.png.fa7d71a9a39b51d154a94e6307801170.png

Image sourced from Fold3

 

To confuse things a bit further, the Absent Voters Lists for 1919 appear to show him living away from home on the qualifying date, but serving with the 4th Battalion.

 

image.png.2c7272e21d1292b767dd50208d886bfa.png

 

image.png.4716edb253315a366030f4923ef3023e.png

Image sourced from Findmypast

 

Unfortunately, I didn't see surviving papers for George. My guess would be that he might have been wounded late in the war with a front line [1st ??] Battalion, taken off their establishment list (so they could try to claim a replacement), and transferred to a Reserve Battalion (perhaps even notionally as a paperwork exercise) to allow for treatment and recuperation pending a medical assessment of his ongoing fitness.

 

Regards

Chris

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Interesting that the Pension card from CLK shows a sergeant but everything else refers to Corporal

 

George

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T

13 hours ago, clk said:

 

13 hours ago, clk said:

Hello Chris, 

 

This is fascinating - all of it! He did survive, however was wounded out as he was blinded in one eye and they couldn't remove the shrapnel behind the eyeball. I think you theory of being moved around regiments for the purpose of being reassessed. This is so intriguing! He was my neighbour's grandfather and as so many did, he never mentioned the war. All she knew was that he was blind in one eye and had a huge bit of shrapnel in his arm too that they couldn't remove for some reason. May have to try some hospital records if I can find them. My neighbour will be so excited, I am putting it all into a book for her and getting it printed. She is 81 so I thought it was a perfect thing to do for her. On another note, this forum is amazing!  Thank you! 

T

13 hours ago, clk said:

 

 

I wonder if he recovered from that wound, and was subsequently 'recycled' to another Battalion. The reason I say that is Fold3 appear to have a pension index card (link - get in quickly, as they are offering free access for literally the next day or so).  It indicates that following his discharge on 27.12.1919 he received a pension due to an assessed disability of 40% due to a wound to his right eye. It might be a clerical error but the card seems to suggest that he may have been with the 1st Battalion at the time of his wounding.

 

 

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He got in some trouble in 1923 according to this article courtesy of The British Newspaper Archive.

 

Snap 2021-05-29 at 18.25.36.png

 

 

Apparently his speed was estimated at over 20mph.

Edited by sadbrewer
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x

5 minutes ago, sadbrewer said:

He got in some trouble in 1923 according to this article courtesy of The British Newspaper Archive.

 

Snap 2021-05-29 at 18.25.36.png

 

 

Apparently his speed was estimated at over 20mph.      Oh my goodness! That is amazing! THANK YOU! How hilarious by our times!

21 hours ago, clk said:

 

Quote

Hello Chris, 

 

This is fascinating - all of it! He did survive, however was wounded out as he was blinded in one eye and they couldn't remove the shrapnel behind the eyeball. I think you theory of being moved around regiments for the purpose of being reassessed. This is so intriguing! He was my neighbour's grandfather and as so many did, he never mentioned the war. All she knew was that he was blind in one eye and had a huge bit of shrapnel in his arm too that they couldn't remove for some reason. May have to try some hospital records if I can find them. My neighbour will be so excited, I am putting it all into a book for her and getting it printed. She is 81 so I thought it was a perfect thing to do for her. On another note, this forum is amazing!  Thank you! 

T

Quote

 

 

I wonder if he recovered from that wound, and was subsequently 'recycled' to another Battalion. The reason I say that is Fold3 appear to have a pension index card (link - get in quickly, as they are offering free access for literally the next day or so).  It indicates that following his discharge on 27.12.1919 he received a pension due to an assessed disability of 40% due to a wound to his right eye. It might be a clerical error but the card seems to suggest that he may have been with the 1st Battalion at the time of his wounding.

 

 

THANK YOU ALL this is amazing! 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Emma - just to add that his service number - 20976 - is consistent with an enlistment date of 21st December 1914. 

 

Several men with service numbers close to his were first posted to the 9th Battalion before being transferred to the 17th Battalion. The 17th Battn didn't actually start recruiting until the 1st June 1915.

 

cheers

Mike

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On 29/05/2021 at 18:26, sadbrewer said:

He got in some trouble in 1923 according to this article courtesy of The British Newspaper Archive.

 

Snap 2021-05-29 at 18.25.36.png

 

 

Apparently his speed was estimated at over 20mph.

I was wondering if you had the rest of the article available?

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