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Remembered Today:

German plane with swastika to identify


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airdaniele

Hello Sirs,

which type of aircraft is this?

Thanks, Daniele.

K308198_12 - Copia (2).jpg

K308198_13 - Copia (2).jpg

K308198_13 - Copia.jpg

K308198_13.jpg

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The swastika is the left facing type used by Indian religions as a symbol of divinity and good luck prior to its modification and use in the 1930s by Nazi Germany by changing to right facing and rotating 45 degrees.

 

I wonder if it brought the pilot any good luck on this occasion. 

 

As to the plane type, I'll leave that to others, although there's not much left.

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KizmeRD

Values and meanings of symbols were different in Imperial Germany during the Great War, and pilots often chose other well known symbols too...

MB

D578AE5A-E043-4D05-A87C-F25C55D50B66.jpeg
 

See also,

 

Edited by KizmeRD
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Looking at the shape of the fin and rudder, I think this is a Rumpler C.IV.

 

The origin of the swastika is from Sanskrit. It is a compound of 'su' (meaning good) and 'astika' (meaning a sign or symbol). When two vowels are combined there is a liguistic rule called 'sandhi', which means that the first vowel is converted into a consonant, so 'u' becomes 'v' – svastika. In German a 'w' is pronounced as 'v', hence the eventual spelling of swastika.

 

The swastika was also used in the UK, such as by the War Savings Association. I have a savings card and stamps of a Sopwith employee and a couple of badges with the swastika on. It was used flat rather than at 45 degrees.

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3 hours ago, Fovant said:

Looking at the shape of the fin and rudder, I think this is a Rumpler C.IV.

 

The origin of the swastika is from Sanskrit. It is a compound of 'su' (meaning good) and 'astika' (meaning a sign or symbol). When two vowels are combined there is a liguistic rule called 'sandhi', which means that the first vowel is converted into a consonant, so 'u' becomes 'v' – svastika. In German a 'w' is pronounced as 'v', hence the eventual spelling of swastika.

 

The swastika was also used in the UK, such as by the War Savings Association. I have a savings card and stamps of a Sopwith employee and a couple of badges with the swastika on. It was used flat rather than at 45 degrees.

 

The right facing swastika was also used as an insignia by both the Finnish (1918-45) & Latvian (1918-1940) air forces at various angles and colours

 

NigelS

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16 hours ago, KizmeRD said:

Values and meanings of symbols were different in Imperial Germany during the Great War, and pilots often chose other well known symbols too...

MB

D578AE5A-E043-4D05-A87C-F25C55D50B66.jpeg
 

See also,

 

Voss was not Jewish.

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KizmeRD

Sorry, I wasn’t making any assertions regarding any individual pilot’s religion, just the fact that symbols used on WW1 aircraft cannot be intrinsically linked with subsequent ideologies and it would be wrong to associate these with political movements that hadn’t yet come into existence. i.e. there is no contemporary connection to Nazism, or indeed to Zionism.

MB

 

 

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healdav
On 03/05/2021 at 11:03, Fovant said:

Looking at the shape of the fin and rudder, I think this is a Rumpler C.IV.

 

The origin of the swastika is from Sanskrit. It is a compound of 'su' (meaning good) and 'astika' (meaning a sign or symbol). When two vowels are combined there is a liguistic rule called 'sandhi', which means that the first vowel is converted into a consonant, so 'u' becomes 'v' – svastika. In German a 'w' is pronounced as 'v', hence the eventual spelling of swastika.

 

The swastika was also used in the UK, such as by the War Savings Association. I have a savings card and stamps of a Sopwith employee and a couple of badges with the swastika on. It was used flat rather than at 45 degrees.

I have a couple of books, notably Kim and Jungle Book which have swastikas on the cover. And they are from the very early 1900s.

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