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Courcy Le Chateau May 1917


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Yes I would think they would treat them like that as it was a lot harder times and they thought they had to put them through the mill as we would say.Treat them all the same and see if the cream would rise to the top . Thank you for doing these . I think Josephef Beising was probably wounded at the battle of Notre de lorrette where his Regiment was severely mauled and most of the regiment was killed or wounded

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knittinganddeath

Wirschaftskompagnie 117

Feldpostkarte

 

An

Hornist Walter Meinhold

Fus. Reg. No. 96

11. Komp

 

Samstag d. 16/9.1917

Werther Kamerad Walter

Sitze soeben mit meinem

alten Heimatsfreund Albert

bei einem Schoppen Bier ged. . . .

d. . .in, Albert ganz unverhofft

gekommen. O welche Freude

wenn 2 Altbekannte nach

fast 2 Jahren lieb Freunds. . .

dränken? können. Werde ihn

Abends nach Bahnhof Machault?

begleiten. Die herzlichsten Grüsse

bei Gesunds. . .s

sendet dir dein

alten Freund Louis Utffz? Schädlich

 

On the side: Letzten? auch Herman St. . . . besucht.

 

To: Hornist Walter Meinhold, Fusilier Regiment No. 96, 11th company

 

Saturday, 16.9.1917

Worthy comrade Walter,

Sitting just now with my old friend from home Albert with a pint of beer. . . . Albert came wholly unexpectedly. O what joy when 2 old friends can, after 2 years, sweetly water their friendship.(1) I will accompany him to the station at Machault? in the evening. Your old friend Louis (2) sends warmest greetings for your health (3).

 

On the side: Recently also visited Herman St. . .

 

1) "still water their friendship" is a big guess, based mainly on context. "dränken" isn't a German word, but it could be dialect.

 

2) I think the thing that he added afterwards near his name says Utffz. Schädlich.  There is a Louis Schädlich in the Verlustlisten but he isn't an Unteroffizier yet. However, I think beer was quite rare in France so if they are indeed at Machault (near Fontainebleau, Melun, and Montereau) it might be a perk of being an officer.

 

3) It's actually something health-related, but I can't read the second part.

 

 

 

Abs. Johann Unschold . . . Bag? Res. Inf. Reg.

3. Ko[m]p. 1. Batt. 5. . . . . Res. Division

 

An

Frau Anna Uschold

in Etzenricht b. Weiden

Oberpfalz

Bayern

 

Am 26. Juli 1915

Die besten Grüsse vom Schlacht

feld und Frankreich sendet

dir dein treulieb. . .r

Hans ich bin Gottseidank gesund

was ich von dir auch di und

dein beiden Kindern hoffe.

 

Sender: Johann Uschold

To: Mrs Anna Uschold, in Etzenricht near Weiden, Oberpfalz, Bavaria

 

On the 26th of July 1915

Your faithful Hans sends you warmest greetings from the battlefield and France. I am, thank God, healthy, which I hope is also true of you and both your children/both of the children.

 

I am not sure if he refers to 'your children' or 'the children' because he has written 'dein,' which means yours, but it is not in the right grammatical form for its place in the sentence. He might mean 'den' (the), which to me implies that they are his children too.

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Thank you They are great translations Thank you for doing them .I have tryed to do some research on some of these people but im not having a lot of luck at the moment but im percevering .I m posting another couple if you wish to do them

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knittinganddeath

Craonne! I've been obsessed lately with the Winterberg tunnel (collapsed in Craonne in May 1917), so this was a nice surprise. The caption says "Conquered and renovated/rebuilt French trench."

 

Abs. August Humel, Bay. Ersatz Division, Sanitäts-Komp.

 

An. Wohlgeb[oren]

Frau Mina Humel

Uhrmachermstrsgattin

Nördlingen

Bayern

 

den 21. Juli 1915

Meine Liebste!

Brief am 16. u. Karte von Wertingen

bestdankend erhalten bin gesund

und munter u. hof[f]e dass es zu Hause

ebenso ist. Beste Grüsse an Hr. Herrman.

Lege mir bei nächsten Päkchen

oval? Uhrbügel bei. Nickl, Weihse, und

vergoldet sind unten im Schrank

noch in den Schachteln. eine Menge da

man muss jetzt alles verwerten.

. . . . . . . . . werden sehr teuer.

 

[on the front] Gott mit uns. Beste Grüsse an Herrn u. Frau G...

Zeitungen bestdankend erhalten, von Josef

noch nichts Näheres erhalten? Hr Pfarrer

Fylingen? werde ich schreiben. Mit Grüssen

u. Küssen an Alles. dein August

 

From: August Humel, Bavarian Ersatz Division, Sanitäts-Komp.

To: the High-born Mina Humel, Master Watchmaker's Wife, Nördlingen, Bavaria

 

21 July 1915

My dearest!

Letter on the 16th and the card from Wertingen most thankfully received. I am healthy and cheerful and hope it is the same at home. Warm greetings to Mr Herrman. In the next package, send me oval? watch straps. Nickel, white, and gold-plated are downstairs in the cupboard still in the box. A lot of them since one has to use everything now. . . . . . become very expensive.

 

[on the front] God with us. Warm greetings to Mr and Mrs G. . . . Newspapers thankfully received, nothing else yet received from Josef? I will write to Pastor Fylingen. With greetings and kisses for all. Yours, August.

 

Wohlgeboren refers to the lowest rank of German nobility.

Wertingen is about 45 km from Nördlingen.

 

 

 

The card from Riga 1916.

 

Abs. Gefr Schönemann, 2. Comp Rest-Inf-R. 24, 6. Res-Div.

 

An

Fräulein

Lucie? Duch

Cottbus

Wilhelmstr 2 II

 

Rigafront, d. 10. Septemb. 16

Liebe Lucie! Mit dieser neuesten? Aufnahme? sen

de ich Dir und deinen lieben

Eltern viele herzliche Grüsse. Mir

gehts recht gut! Schon jetzt sch. . .es

Sommerwetter. Nachts sund aller

dings schon recht kühl. . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

 

On the side: Mit herz. Grüsse.

 

Sender: Gefreiter Schönemann [amazing that he has his own stamp for his return address!]

To: Miss Lucie Duch, Cottbus, Wilhelmstr 2 II

 

Riga front, 10 September 1916

Dear Lucie! With this latest photograph I send you and your dear parents many warm greetings. I am doing very well! Still . . . . summer weather. By the way, nights are already quite cool. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

 

On the side: With warm greetings.

 

Lucie Duch sounds like a really Czech name to me. I wonder if the family were from that region. But if that is the case then what were they doing in Cottbus?

 

 

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Thank you for these ,I have had a quick look for more Craonne but with no luck at the moment butwill keep looking .Im not good on european names so cant help with Cottbus. Thank you for the extra information on plaes and German nobility .I post another 2 but they are in pencil so appoligys but could be interesting

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knittinganddeath

Here is the one without any picture.

 

Abs.

Meine jetzige Adresse:

Landst.

Jos. Jaeger?

Inf Regt 438, Div 10

Feldpoststation 774

 

An

Herrn u. Frau

Camille Ga. . . t

Pfirt

Ober-Elsass

 

Geschrieben den 11.2.1917

Liebe Freunde,

Soeben habe ich das Paket erhalten welches

Sie vor ungefähr 2 Monaten weggeschickt

habe[n]. Alles war noch gut in Ordnung, meinen

tausendfachen Dank dafür. Wir kommen auch

wieder weg zu sein wohin noch unbekannt.

Der Urlaub ist auch noch immer gesperrt. Hier

ist auch eine strenge Kälte. Sind Sie noch alle

gesund, wie ich Ihnen wünsche, ja. Von Fridolin?

habe ich die Adresse nicht mehr, richtet Ihr? bitte einen

schönen Gruss aus. Indessen sendich ich Ihnen und ganzer Familien

herzlichsten Gruss.

 

From:

My current address

Jo[hanne]s Jaeger, Inf Regt 438, 10th Div, Feldpost station 774

 

To:

Mr & Mrs Camille G. . .t, Pfrirt (1)

Upper Alsace

 

Written on 11.2.1917

Dear Friends,

I just received the package that you sent off about 2 months ago. Everything was still in order, my thousandfold thanks for it. We will soon be away again, but we don't know where yet. Holiday/leave is also still cancelled. Here there is also terrible cold. Are you all still healthy, I hope you are. I don't have Fridolin's (2) address any more, please give him my greetings. In the meantime I'm sending you and your whole family the warmest of greetings.

 

1) Pfirt is now in France and is called Ferrette.

2) Not sure if I read this name correctly as it sounded very odd. But it makes sense: Fridolin of Säckingen founded a monastery and was known as an apostle of the Alemanni, the German-speaking people around Alsace/Switzerland.

 

Re: moustaches, from what you said and other observations I have started to wonder if only married men wore them.

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Thank you for that .You are getting faster and faster.Im not sure if only married men wore them but there seems to be a lot around .I will put 2 more on as you are doing so well Thanks again.If you dont want any more please just say.

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knittinganddeath

Hi @GROBBY I am very happy to keep on with it. They're a good distraction. I think of them as little puzzles and am always very pleased when I manage to solve one.

 

Anyway, the postcard with the sketch is from Villers sous Prény and I think I may have found the same spot in Google Maps! The fountain has the same shape (though some details are not quite the same) and the buildings beside it are also the same shape though they don't seem to be exactly the same as the ones in the postcard. There is no tower to be seen anywhere today, but if you rotate yourself on the map and look down the street the same line of trees on the horizon is there. If you continue down the street, you see a house that has two "windows" that are actually green wooden doors/shutters, and on that house you can see that there used to be a door at street level but isn't any longer. This house is partially visible in the drawing behind the troops on horseback.

 

(am still trying to figure out some last illegible bits of text. more on that tomorrow, probably.)

 

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Well done you have it spot on .That is definately where the picture was drawn .The church tower has changed a bit but its still there but further down the road ,The artist used a bit of artistic license and brought it foward a bit and changed the fountain a bit as there is a rememberance to a french war hero on it.I wonder if the drawing is a standard one or if the person writing the card was the artist ?. I have just noticed the bridge just past the 2 cavalry it is still there but has iron railings now but the stream still flows under .Good luck with the translation and have a great day

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knittinganddeath

Bourgogne church

 

Abs. Joh. Reschke? Keschke?

Landst. Btl./ Bautzen / 3. . . . 2. Komp.

 

An

Dörle Richter

b/ H. Paul Timmerer

Möderbrugg b/Oberzeiring

Obersteier -- Österreich

 

den 17.4.16

Meine liebe Frd Dörle!

Eben deinen lieben Brief von 7. erhalten

und sage meinen besten Dank. Ich werde

in kürzer Zeit, dir einen Brief zukommen

lassen, und gleichzeitig deine Fragen und

Wünsche beantworten. Bekam eben auch

von Liesel eine Karte. Werde bald wieder?

in die Heimat kommen. Befinden ist

auch noch gut. Einstweilen grüsst dich

liebes Dorchen herzlich dein Frd Hans

 

From: Johannes Keschke? Reschke?

Landsturm Battalion, Bautzen, 3. . . . . 2nd company

 

To: Dörle Richter, c/o Mr Paul Timmerer (1), Möderbrugg near Oberzeiring, Upper Styria, Austria

 

17 April 1916

My dear friend Dörle!

Just received your dear letter from the 7th and thank you very much for it. I will send you a letter in a short while (2), and at the same time answer your questions and wishes. Also just received a card from Liesel. Will soon come home again. My health/well-being is also good. In the meantime your friend Hans sends you, dear little Dörle, warm greetings.

 

1) The Timmerer family still operate a hotel in Möderbrugg today. Maybe Dörle worked there.

 

2) He uses a medieval abbreviation for double consonants -- a dash over the letter that should be repeated (the M in Timmerer and zukommen). Have seen this in medieval manuscripts, never knew it continued for so long afterwards.

 

The pre-printed text on the postcard says it has been censored by the military and is allowed to be freely circulated. Not sure if this refers to the message or the picture or both.

 

Some paradoxes: The card is cancelled by the KD Feldpostamt, which is German. It is also stamped ÜBERPRÜFT kuk . . . . . which means "checked [by] the Royal & Imperial" Austrian something or other. The return address looks like it includes Bautzen, which is a town in Saxony. Maddeningly, I can't read his unit names!

 

"French village Villers sous Prény near Pont à Mous[s]on during wartime"

In another thread someone said that German army units often had a designated artist (either amateur or professional), and they would make drawings that were then printed as postcards. So even if Oskar Schreiner didn't draw it himself, there could be a good chance that he knew the man who did.

 

Abs. Kanonier Oskar Schreiner

Res. Fussartl. Bataillon No 12

Pa. . . . Kompagnie

 

An Fräulein Elisa Schreiner

Adorf i/Vgtld / Kgr Sachsen

Freiburgerstr 7

 

Frankreich, 30.8.15

Liebe Schwester!

Sende dir sowie Eltern u. Geschwister

die herzlichsten Grüsse aus dem Felde

und wünsche, dass Ihr alles Gesund

seid wie ich es Gott sei dank bin.

Noch an als Gruss Oskar

Viele Grüsse an Verwandten u. Bekannte?

 

From: Kanonier Oskar Schreiner, Res. FussArt-Bataillon No 12, Pa. . .Company

To: Miss Elisa Schreiner, Adorf in Vogtland, Kingdom of Saxony, Freiburgerstr. 7

 

France, 30 August 1915

Dear Sister!

Sending warmest greetings from the field to you as well as our parents and siblings, and hoping that you are all healthy, as thank God, am I. Greetings to everyone again. Oskar. Many greetings to our relatives and acquaintances.

 

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Its interesting that the Timmerer still operate a hotel in Moderbrugg and im glad you are so good at german that you understand the old abbreviations.My german is tiny and is only good enough to order a drink or hotel room ( thats the english for you ) But I try to learn a little of the language of all the countrys I visit. I know there is still the group photo but when you are ready for the next let me know

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I'll comment more fully later, but can confirm that I am familiar with both of these units and have photos and Feldpost from both.

The Landsturm unit is Landsturm-Infanterie-Bataillon Bautzen XII.3. I wrote a detailed article about it (and another battalion) in the following article, part of an ongoing series on all of the Saxon Landsturm infantry battalions. This card from April 1916 adds some new information! :)
https://www.facebook.com/groups/german1914/permalink/843063379872040/

Note that all my articles are set to 'public' so no Facebook login or account is needed to view them.

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Hi Bierast,

interesting endeavour. I don´t have many Saxon Landsturm photos in my collection, as I concentrate on the Landsturm of the IX. AK, but this is what I have, if you might want to have a look, write a PM.

GreyC

XII.3 – Landsturm-Infanterie-Bataillon Bautzen

XII.9 – Landsturm-Infanterie-Bataillon Flöha

XII.10 – 1.Landsturm-Infanterie-Ersatz-Bataillon des XII.Armee-Korps

XII.11 – 2.Landsturm-Infanterie-Ersatz-Bataillon des XII.Armee-Korps [Zittau]

XIX.19 – Landsturm-Infanterie-Bataillon Auerbach

Landsturmpionierkompanie des XII AK

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knittinganddeath

@bierast Very nice to get more context about the battalion and the situations/places that they were in. And the photo with the king and wisent was amazing -- I had no idea that such animals lived in Europe. Also, one of your other articles introduced me to Dresdner Totengedenkbuch, for which I must also thank you very much too!

 

@GROBBY Here is the other group postcard. There are still lots of blanks but I don't think I can read more than this. He seems to be sending crates to his mom and sister. Did they know the armistice was coming and start packing up?

 

Abs. Gefr. Juch? Juck?

Bayr. Rev. Inf. . . .

Deutsche Feldpost No. 776

 

An

Frau Agnes THiel

Rabenstein b/Chemnitz

Anton-Strasse No 5

(Sachsen)

 

Ukraina d. 9.11.18

Liebe Mutter u. Schwester!

Diesmal scheint es lange zu dauern

ehe Ihr Euere? Kisten erhaltet. Habe

indessen wieder eine Kiste Me. . . . mit

45 . . . .  . . . . . abgeschickt. Zu den nächsten

Tagen geht wieder eine ab. Hier haben

wir uns Sch. . . . . . lassen. Habt Ihr

das Geld schon abgeschickt. Wenn nicht

dan[n] lasse es sein. Mit Gruss Euer . . . .

 

On the side: Nicht mehr schreiben, neue Adresse.

 

From: Gefreiter Juch? Juck?, Bayr. Rev. Inf. . . . , German Feldpost No. 776

 

To: Mrs Agnes Thiel, Rabenstein near Chemnitz, Anton Street No. 5 (Saxony)

 

Ukraine, 9.11.18

Dear Mother and Sister!

This time it seems like a long time before you receive your crates. In the meantime I've sent another one with . . . . 45 . . . . In the next few days another one will go off. Here we have . . . . Have you already sent the money. If not then just let it be. Greetings from. . . . .

 

 

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knittinganddeath

This is the letter to Josef Beising.

 

Mühlhausen Amt Engen 15.8.14

Feldpostkarte

Vermisst s[eit] 27.8            zurück

 

An den Musketier J. Beising

Mühlhausen i/Els.

14. Armeekorps, 4te Komp, 7. Bad. Inf Reg 142, 1. Batl.

 

Abs. Stefan Beising

Mühlhausen

 

Mühlhausen den 15.8.14

Lieber Bruder!

In unserm letzten Briefe hat

unser Vater dir nicht erwä[h]nt, dass

wir den roten Sack und 1 Paket

richtig erhalten haben. Stiefel, Schuhe

und alles anderen war darin.

Wenn du inzwischen die M 20 noch

nicht erhalten hast, dann schreibe

uns bald möglich, damit wir dier?

anderes senden können. Bei der

Post haben wir schon reklamiert.

Wir haben jetzt 2 Briefe vom 11. & 12.

August von dir erhalten und hat uns

deren Inhalt recht gefreut. Die Ernte

haben wir jetzt bis auf 3 Vi. . .ling

Gerste? und den Hafer unter dach. Das

Wetter war die letzten Wochen recht schön.

Am Montag senden wir dir 1 Paket

Esswaren. Grossvater & Grossmutter

grüssen dich bestens, auch ich sende dir

in Namen von uns allen die herz-

lichsten Grüssen und hoffen auf ein

baldiges frohes Wiedersehen. Dein Bruder Stefan

 

Vorläufig bin ich während der

Kriegszeit zu Hause, schreibe bald

wieder und deine ganze Adressen

nach vorgedeutener? Einteilung.

 

 

 

 

Mühlhausen Post Office Engen [in Baden] 15.8.14

Field postcard

Missing since 27/8           [send] back (1)

 

To:

Musketier J. Beising, Mühlhausen in Alsace (2), 14. Armeekorps, 4th Komp, 7th Baden Infantry Regiment 142, 1st Battalion

 

From:

Stefan Beising, Mühlhausen

 

Dear Brother! In our last letter, our father did not mention that we received the red bag and 1 package. Boots, shoes, and everything else was in it. If in the meantime you have not received the 20 marks, then write us as soon as possible so that we can send you? more. We have already made a claim at the post office.

 

We have now received 2 of your letters, from the 11th and 12th, and were very happy about the contents. We have already brought in the harvest, oats and at least 3 Vi . . .ling (3) of barley. The weather has been very nice for the past few weeks.

 

On Monday we will send you 1 package of food. Grandfather and Grandmother send their greetings, and so do I on behalf of all of us, hoping for a happy and quick reunion. Your brother Stefan.

 

For the time being, I will be at home during the war, write again soon with your whole address according to your unit/division.

 

1) A different person has written "Vermisst s[eit] 27/8" (missing since 27/8) as well as "zurück" meaning send back. ETA: Thanks GreyC for confirming it is Vermisst.

 

2) The family lives in Mühlhausen in Baden near Konstanz, but Josef was in Mühlhausen, Alsace (now Mulhouse and part of France).

 

3) I guessed that V. . .ling might be an obsolete unit of measurement referring either to area or weight/volume, but couldn't find any term that would match those letters.

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, knittinganddeath said:

V. . . . s. 27/8

 

That s the interesting part of the card.

Vermißt seit (missing since) 27th of August....

GreyC

 

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knittinganddeath
11 minutes ago, GreyC said:

 

That s the interesting part of the card.

Vermißt seit (missing since) 27th of August....

GreyC

 

Very good to know! Am feeling happily validated about my timid guess, so thank you ;-) He later turned up; his sister wrote to him the following year at a Vereins-Lazarett.

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7 hours ago, knittinganddeath said:

I guessed that V. . .ling might be an obsolete unit of measurement referring either to area or weight/volume

A good guess! A Vierling is an obsolete surface measure used in Southern Germany and in Switzerland. 1 Vierling equals 10 by 10 meters.

GreyC

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On 12/04/2021 at 15:38, knittinganddeath said:

2) He uses a medieval abbreviation for double consonants -- a dash over the letter that should be repeated (the M in Timmerer and zukommen). Have seen this in medieval manuscripts, never knew it continued for so long afterwards.

 

The pre-printed text on the postcard says it has been censored by the military and is allowed to be freely circulated. Not sure if this refers to the message or the picture or both.


Some paradoxes: The card is cancelled by the KD Feldpostamt, which is German. It is also stamped ÜBERPRÜFT kuk . . . . . which means "checked [by] the Royal & Imperial" Austrian something or other. The return address looks like it includes Bautzen, which is a town in Saxony. Maddeningly, I can't read his unit names!

 

 

As mentioned, the unit is Saxon Landsturm-Infanterie-Bataillon Bautzen XII.3, operating under Etappen-Inspektion 3. I had thought at first that the stamp of the Grosse Hauptquartier was new information, but I've found I already have a card saved in my system from a member of the same 2. Kompagnie with the same stamp (dated five days earlier). This is consistent with the battalion's known presence in the area of Charleville, the location of the Grosse Hauptquartier at this time.


The marking over double consonants was not at all uncommon in German handwriting at this time. As for the message re. censorship, this refers to the picture. In albums of photos by unit photographers I've sometimes seen images specifically marked as 'not for publication' - usually because it shows detail of the German defenses.

The Austrian checking is simply due to the fact that the recipient of this card lived in Austria, and it was checked upon passing into their postal system. Many Saxons had friends and relatives across the border in Austria-Hungary, especially those who lived in the Saxon border regions (likely in the case of a man who was in this battalion, raised in the Bautzen area).

 

Quote

 

"French village Villers sous Prény near Pont à Mous[s]on during wartime"

In another thread someone said that German army units often had a designated artist (either amateur or professional), and they would make drawings that were then printed as postcards. So even if Oskar Schreiner didn't draw it himself, there could be a good chance that he knew the man who did.

 

Abs. Kanonier Oskar Schreiner

Res. Fussartl. Bataillon No 12

Pa. . . . Kompagnie

 


Unfortunately here is nothing on the front or back to indicate that this card was directly connected to this unit, although it is possible. The unit is the Park-Kompagnie of Saxon Reserve-Fußartillerie-Bataillon 12; I believe this company would have been responsible for its parent heavy artillery (21cm Mörser) battalion's ammunition dump. 

From copious Feldpost evidence we know that the Park-Kompagnie was attached to 10. Reserve-Division / V. Reservekorps on the east bank of the Meuse (Verdun front) from at least 31st January to 31st October 1915. It's unclear how much of the parent was actually operating with it at the time, as the available evidence is sparse and confused. German heavy artillery organisation was quite ad-hoc, and individual batteries were shuffled around and regrouped in a manner which is very difficult to keep track of.

The photo below is the only one I have from the Park-Kompagnie / Reserve-Fußartillerie-Bataillon 12. The 'F' indicates that this is a telephone (Fernsprech) dugout.

RFussaR12_ParkKomp.jpg.900d97847e64938f31d41b1f397154fc.jpg

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On 13/04/2021 at 19:47, GreyC said:

Hi Bierast,

interesting endeavour. I don´t have many Saxon Landsturm photos in my collection, as I concentrate on the Landsturm of the IX. AK, but this is what I have, if you might want to have a look, write a PM.

GreyC

XII.3 – Landsturm-Infanterie-Bataillon Bautzen

XII.9 – Landsturm-Infanterie-Bataillon Flöha

XII.10 – 1.Landsturm-Infanterie-Ersatz-Bataillon des XII.Armee-Korps

XII.11 – 2.Landsturm-Infanterie-Ersatz-Bataillon des XII.Armee-Korps [Zittau]

XIX.19 – Landsturm-Infanterie-Bataillon Auerbach

Landsturmpionierkompanie des XII AK


I'd be very interested to see any of these, but especially the XIX.19 (as I'm writing an article involving them this weekend) and the Pionier. There were actually three Landsturm-Pionier-Kompagnien from each of the Saxon corps, so I'm curious to find out which one it is (if possible). The available photographic evidence is quite sparse!

These articles are intended to help other collectors to work out where their own photos and Feldpost fit into the known story of these battalions; I'd be intrigued to hear how you got on with your XII.AK ones, if you happen to have already looked up the relevant pieces in my series.

Sadly I don't have anything from any IX.AK Landsturm units, but I will keep my eye out for anything relevant.

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Hi Bierast,

here you go. You may be able to shed some light on the connection between the Pionierkompanie 272 and the 3rd Landwehr-Pionier-Kompanie of the XII AK. Maybe it is just coincidental proximity. The unit stamp is of the latter, the sender is a Pionier Schröder of the Pionierkompanie 272. The date sent 9th April 1917, handled by Feldpoststation 823. So maybe the place somewhere on the Eastern front can thus be determined.

GreyC

PS: Sorry about XIX.19! Made a mistake in registering it. It was actually XIX.22!

706185215_x272_PionierkompanieBehelfsbrucke300mlangOstfrontFP823.jpg.7a10bd79b9d24f86d3de0eb03cc67248.jpg825226180_x272_PionierkompanieBehelfsbrucke300mlangOstfrontFP823StempelXII_3LandsturmpionierkompaniedesXIIAK09041917.jpg.35029910f26db2baaf5231f5760129ad.jpg

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8 hours ago, GreyC said:

Hi Bierast,

here you go. You may be able to shed some light on the connection between the Pionierkompanie 272 and the 3rd Landwehr-Pionier-Kompanie of the XII AK. Maybe it is just coincidental proximity. The unit stamp is of the latter, the sender is a Pionier Schröder of the Pionierkompanie 272. The date sent 9th April 1917, handled by Feldpoststation 823. So maybe the place somewhere on the Eastern front can thus be determined.

GreyC

PS: Sorry about XIX.19! Made a mistake in registering it. It was actually XIX.22!


Thanks Grey - there is some new and very interesting information here! Feldpoststation 823 corresponds to the 84. Infanterie-Division, in the ‘Deliatitchi - Negnevitchi sector’ on the Niemen. Pionier-Kompagnie 272 (Prussian) was a permanent part of that division, while Landsturm-Pionier-Kompagnie XII.3 was presumably attached. Also attached at the time was 2. Landsturm-Infanterie-Bataillon Dresden XII.2, and I've covered this (with pictures) in their article here:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/german1914/permalink/836667603844951/

XIX.22 was the main Grenzschutz battalion on the XIX.AK district border with Austrian Bohemia from autumn 1915 onwards. I've done my best to map the operational locations of all the Grenzschutz units in this article:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/german1914/permalink/823796695132042/

ARL 

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Hi,

thanks for that. Will follow up on your linked articles and post the XIX.22 pictures in a different thread as I don´t want to hijack this one.

GreyC

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