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Remembered Today:

Tank oiler?


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lyman1903

Rimmed containers,  set of 2,  

 

no dates or numbers, or broad arrows etc, 

 

going from memory,  not quite 2' tall,  rimmed on one side, 

 

basically steel cannisters that look like a shell casing, but have  sealable opening , and a small brass spout that is held in place by a spring, 

 

 

I've posted thes in a couple places over the years and the general consensus is they look like an oiler, but no one has seen one like it, 

 

 

may be WW1??   or not?

 

 

 

 

PXL_20210122_032437660.jpg

Edited by lyman1903
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lyman1903

Side view

PXL_20210122_032347696.jpg

End with filler or removable cap/plug

PXL_20210122_032418880.jpg

Last one with the d-ring for the cap pulled up

PXL_20210122_032409613.jpg

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GRANVILLE

Anyone's guess if this helps but from a copy of  Mechanical Maintenance of the MK IV Tank, under the section: Lubrication of the Transmission, is the following - Clutch - The greaser on the clutch extension shaft must be refilled and screwed right down twice daily. The two greasers on the ball-race housing must be refilled and screwed down once daily.

Unfortunately there are no illustrations with the instructions.

 

With your reference to them being considered 'oilers', I wondered if it was more likely they were grease tubes? I would say the colour and condition of the paint on them, puts them in the right period.

 

David

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lyman1903
36 minutes ago, GRANVILLE said:

Anyone's guess if this helps but from a copy of  Mechanical Maintenance of the MK IV Tank, under the section: Lubrication of the Transmission, is the following - Clutch - The greaser on the clutch extension shaft must be refilled and screwed right down twice daily. The two greasers on the ball-race housing must be refilled and screwed down once daily.

Unfortunately there are no illustrations with the instructions.

 

With your reference to them being considered 'oilers', I wondered if it was more likely they were grease tubes? I would say the colour and condition of the paint on them, puts them in the right period.

 

David

thanks for that info, 

 

I don't think they are grease tubes simply because there would be no way to fill or get grease out, 

the opening on the rounded 'neck' is not  that large either, 

 

I'll take a pic of the the 'neck' and  post it up

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lyman1903

Nipple, spout or neck? Attached

PXL_20210304_233848100.jpg

PXL_20210304_233926551.jpg

PXL_20210304_233937810.jpg

PXL_20210304_234007485.jpg

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GRANVILLE

I'd be more interested to see what the handle on the other end does. Does it unscrew so that the canister can be filled?

 

David

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lyman1903

it unscrews,  (basically a D ring) and the nipple from screws into it,

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GRANVILLE

With it now. I can see where the oiler idea has come from but struggle to see its use practically.

 

David

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lyman1903

that's the quandry, 

 

I am fairly certain these are not one off's, as in only a couple made,  

 

yet I cannot find any reference, or any one that would know, why the are shaped like a the brass part of a cartridge, and what they would hold

 

seems in field use the nozzle would get lost quickly,   since only that coil spring and a groove in the container hold it in place, 

 

so far they have been great conversation starters!!

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