Jump to content
The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

books


Alecras234
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hey guys i hope you're all keeping safe.    I need some advice please.   I'm reading this book but im having trouble remembering what ive read.  A short history of the First World War by Gordon Kerr (Paperback /  softback) 9781843440949 | eBay

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Alcrass, Don't worry  just go back and re-read. Be patient with yourself. Keep notes and font become overly concerned. You will get there.

Regards

David

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was told by a friend to highlight parts of a chapter that i want to remember and then turn what i highlighted into a question and answer it.   I was highlighting parts of the first and second chapters of my book but then i thought is this important to know?    Does it matter what i pick to highlight?  I find it all interesting.

 

Ash

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 minutes ago, Alecras234 said:

I was told by a friend to highlight parts of a chapter that i want to remember and then turn what i highlighted into a question and answer it.   I was highlighting parts of the first and second chapters of my book but then i thought is this important to know?    Does it matter what i pick to highlight?  I find it all interesting.

 

Ash

 

    Speaking as a bookseller- there should never be ANY occasion where highlighter pen should ever be used to vandalise a book. It is a dreadful habit.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Speaking as a bookseller- there should never be ANY occasion where highlighter pen should ever be used to vandalise a book. It is a dreadful habit.  

Is it OK to write comment in a book if something is plainly wrong. after all it is my book.....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

54 minutes ago, stripeyman said:

Is it OK to write comment in a book if something is plainly wrong. after all it is my book.....

  Very lightly, monosylabic, occasionally-and in PENCIL.  Yes,it's your book -but the beasties are designed to perpetuate information and knowledge -the beast should outlast you!!  

Highlighting is a particular problem- as many who do it-students- believe that highlighting is an easy substitute for learning- that because they have highlighted, then that's OK as it shows they have learnt-which they have not. As the late great Bill Shankly famously observed- the only place success comes before work is in the dictionary.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Annotations can add to books, in my view. A book I own that I especially cherish is a 1870 edition of Worth’s ‘History of the Town and Borough of Devonport, sometime Plymouth Dock.’ It’s rather fragile, but at some point in its long life someone annotated some passages in pencil, noting for instance in fine copperplate that he was present at an event mentioned in the text that occurred in 1821.
 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I make notes in pencil. 

 

Would I like a book written in by some general? Yes pls. Highlighter pen or otherwise 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Coldstreamer said:

I make notes in pencil. 

 

Would I like a book written in by some general? Yes pls. Highlighter pen or otherwise 

 

 

 

    Fair enough.  Books written in by Great War generals with a highlighter marker pen may have, er, some difficulties with provenance and authenticity.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 The section of Beaumont Review vol. 12, number 89, where Meyer’s photograph should be appears to have been torn out of the volume. This is a worse crime tearing pages out...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here is a list of questions i made from a chapter of my book, do they sound ok, are they important enough? So do i just highlight any sentence and turn it into a question? when was the schlieffen plan created? 1905
when did Schlieffen die? 1913
who replaced Schlieffen? Moltke
When did Germans enter Belgium? 4 August 1914
What Belgian fortresses were destroyed by the Germans? Liege, Namur Antwerp
When did the German third army capture Dinant? 23 August 1914
Who ordered the flooding of parts of Belgium? The King of Belgium
 
                        

my mate suggested a way to remember facts is to highlight areas of a chapter that i find interesting and then turn it into a question and answer it. I find all of what im reading interesting, i don't know what areas to turn into questions.  I never know what points to highlight in the chapter,  can i highlight anything to turn into a question?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

While noting Guest's always valuable (always) views if it's your book annotate  as you feel necessary if it helps you. That said while seeking to but good quality works I have a number enjoyably annotated works.

regards

David

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A couple of years ago, I acquired a volume on the Portsea Parish, "The Work of a Great Parish", published in 1915, made up of several contributions by curates of that parish and the then vicar. I had spent several months previously researching the clergy of Portsea who served as Army chaplains (around 30 of them), in the Great War, so was first surprised and then delighted that the copy contained a number of pen pictures, yes in ink, written by one of the curates who was in khaki for quite a spell. They were actually quite illuminating in some cases, and were written on blank pages between the sections.

These annotations I enjoyed. The book was dedicated to the Bishop of St Albans, and had an introduction from the Archbishop of York, (later Canterbury), both former vicars of Portsea, and was drawn together with some of his own contributions by the then vicar, later to be Archbishop of York.  One of the contributors was a certain P B Clayton,  another G B Chase, later Master of Selwyn College, before becoming Bishop of Ripon, at least one other contributor, (also an army chaplain) , ended up as a bishop. Some annotations do add to our knowledge.

 

I agree that using highlighters should be considered as a serious crime, much worse even that turning down the corner of a page.

 

Edited by keithmroberts
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, Alecras234 said:
Here is a list of questions i made from a chapter of my book, do they sound ok, are they important enough? So do i just highlight any sentence and turn it into a question? when was the schlieffen plan created? 1905
when did Schlieffen die? 1913
who replaced Schlieffen? Moltke
When did Germans enter Belgium? 4 August 1914
What Belgian fortresses were destroyed by the Germans? Liege, Namur Antwerp
When did the German third army capture Dinant? 23 August 1914
Who ordered the flooding of parts of Belgium? The King of Belgium.

Hi Alecras234,

 making a list of questions and answers that interest you, or grab your attention, sounds like a great idea. You can refer back to them to jog your memory if and when the subject crops up again. 

 Enjoy your reading. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  I think I had better discourse a bit on this-   At base there are only 2 types of book. No, not fiction/non-fiction nor hardback v paperback.  The 2 types are "book as function" and "book as icon".  The former-book as function-is a book that provides us with the information we want, whether fiction or non-fiction. For centuries "book as function" has been the most efficient way to disseminate and transmit information  eg In Cairo and want to catch a bus?  Then the printed annual "City of Cairo Bus Timetable for that year may be ideal-  Anywhere but Cairo and anytime much after that year and the book is useless-BUT it has performed its function. Nowadays,of course, most of "Book as Function" has gone online or is in "e" format -its cheaper, Google makes it universal and its easily changed or updated.

    The second type of book is more elusive- "Book as Icon"  - that is, we crave/desire/buy/collect the book for attributes other than just its information contents-  The most obvious are "First Editions"-  the text is the same as a later  cheapo paperback so why do people pay good money for the "first"?  Or a book in a nice leather binding?  Or "privately printed"? Or with coloured art illustrations?- The answer is that we want the "book" as a cultural object. What people collect and why in the realm of "book as icon" can be most anything-largely a world inhabited by males as it satisfies the deep Neathanderthal gene deep inside of the hunter-gatherer.  I believe that,for instance,there are people out there who collect books about the Great War for "book as icon"- "regimentals" or those with dustjackets (Apologies,Alan)

    Therein lies the difference of opinion about "annotation" or highlighting. Highlighting, frankly, I have no time for -it is a substitute for learning not an aide.  "Annotation"?  Well, the clues are-"of what" and "by whom".  For instance, if I had the "first" of Smith's "Wealth of Nations" with heavy annotations by David Hume, then,yes, an addition to both "book as function" and-more importantly, book as icon.  On the other hand, if I had a first edition Nuremberg Bible with,alas, "annotations" by  Wayne Slob in biro- and all related to his course requirements for a BA degree in Media Studies and Woodwork at the University of Scunthorpe, then-er- not so good.  The annotations must be germane to the original book. For instance, -as the man is mentioned by Keith Roberts above- I have near me as I write a book with the nice,neat ink signature on the front free endpaper of "P.B.Clayton"-a nice little object of association with dear old Tubby. Alas, the book is R.W.Chambers "A Book of London English 1384-1425" (Oxford,1931) so Tubby Clayton's provenance and signature may not mean much as -surprisingly-it does not add to our understanding of either Tubby, Toc H or, indeed, the Great War!

    Yes, by all means light annotations IN PENCIL if you have something to say that is relevant to the contents of the book-I say pencil as,with books of enduring value-either/or monetary as well as cultural, the archive rule should prevail-Never do anything to it that cannot be undone. Hence I frown on the use of ink.

    Textbooks?  Scribble away- they are designed to transmit knowledge-eg American science textbooks-the layout is designed down to the last comma to aid asborption and retention.  Icons?  Well remember that in a hundred years time a book may have been produced to still be around long after you-but who then would want Wayne Slob's views on something?

    

   

Edited by Guest
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I love reading your discourses. One of my favourite sayings is 'A good book leaves it's mark upon the reader , a good reader leaves no mark upon the book ' 

(but as with all sayings , as you point out , there are exceptions ! ) .

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a small ex-libris type sticker which often proves useful for covering a scrawled biroed signature.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 minutes ago, Dust Jacket Collector said:

I have a small ex-libris type sticker which often proves useful for covering a scrawled biroed signature.

Nothing wrong with that Alan , and i'm sure it will add to the value one day ! I do like some old bookplates which are works of art in themselves .

I've never really thought of any of my books as being owned by myself , rather i'm just the custodian of them for my lifetime so I've never felt

the urge to write my name in any , although like you i've put a small sticker over a couple of biro signatures in the past .

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I can recall at a book fair some years ago, being shown a copy of a valuable book

which had been liberally written in with biro.  The dealer had used a specialist to remove

the inscriptions, with really good results.

 

Mike.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

25 minutes ago, Black Maria said:

Nothing wrong with that Alan , and i'm sure it will add to the value one day ! I do like some old bookplates which are works of art in themselves .

I've never really thought of any of my books as being owned by myself , rather i'm just the custodian of them for my lifetime so I've never felt

the urge to write my name in any , although like you i've put a small sticker over a couple of biro signatures in the past .

 

   A tasteful bookplate is always an adornment.  My favourites are the very small  white on black ownership labels,usually in italic- stylish, modest and an adornment not an eyesore.  And can be put, say, on the corner on the inside rear cover- We have all seen bookplates mar a book by being too large and inappropriate at the front of a book- with all the vulgarity of of stone eagles at the front of driveways in near to me (Birds of a Feather) Chigwell.

 

   What would be of interest is this:   As with dustjackets, there must be bookplates out there which are works of art related to the Great War.   Has anyone got an example or so to put up???

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, MikeyH said:

I can recall at a book fair some years ago, being shown a copy of a valuable book

which had been liberally written in with biro.  The dealer had used a specialist to remove

the inscriptions, with really good results.

 

Mike.

 

     Hi Mike- Yes, it can be done-though evidence that markings have been removed ,alas, may also indicate that the book is dodgy- Biro marks,etc-fine- "Ex-lib"-I prefer to leave as it is part of provenance - Markings that indicate library stamps have been removed are a problem-without the evidence of"which library?" then criminality is the balance of probabilities.

 

        There is a slight Great War connection with this, which might amuse on this snowy morning:    One of my erstwhile colleagues, who died not long ago, was in his main career an industrial chemist. He wanted some marking removed from books and was recommended to a curious little do-it-yourself fellow in Yorkshire.  He went and the man explained his process as my colleague was concerned that the books might get damaged. The man outlined the mixture of chemicals he used and that it was all done in his garden shed- Oh, and by the way, he even had a little "cat-flap" in the door of his shed to let the chemical smell out as-he said- "it could get a bit whiffy".  My colleague then gently informed him that it was "whiffy" because his mix of chemicals was,in fact, a primitive home-made form of Phosgene...........

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In terms of bookplates, i often like the ones won by someone as a prize and they were  given a specific book. Alas, some of the bookplates and bibles I have seen belonged to those who were subsequently then killed in the war. I have in  my hand as Active Service Testament 1917 no name but the inside the front cover is a message from Lord Roberts to the troops. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, MikeyH said:

I can recall at a book fair some years ago, being shown a copy of a valuable book

which had been liberally written in with biro.  The dealer had used a specialist to remove

the inscriptions, with really good results.

 

Mike.

I have seen ink erasers for sale from specialist suppliers at around £5 and have wondered how good the results of using them were .

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...