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GEW 98


Rangerbob
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I inherited a GEW 98 Mauser that has been frankinsteined by my grandfather.  He was a gunsmith.   I’d like help with indentifying it?

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Very difficult to identify something that you can’t see.

 

Regards,

JMB

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Trying to figure out how to add photos.  I added photos as an attachment.  Are they popping up now?   

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There would usually be a makers name and date on the top of the receiver but yours appears totally plain.

I see it has had a receiver mounted peep sight added but is the base of the original sight there? (I'm just wondering if it was also rebarrelled and if the original sight base is there how it is marked)

 

As it appears to have German imperial proof markings that probably discounts one usual sources of unmarked GEWs -- polish production in the interwar period.

 

I don't know enough about Mausers but I suspect there may have been interwar refinishing programs in places like Poland and Czechoslovakia where markings may have been erased (as they were on many Indian refinished Enfields - about which I know more!)

 

There were also rifles produced by Wehrmanns from standard GEW rifles which were unmarked (details HERE) although these seem to be pretty high standard modifications and I know nothing more about them than I read in the attached thread.

 

Chris

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As mentioned correctly, there is no maker marking visible,secondly the piece is a missmatch as visible on various serials, receiver 3508? letter. magazine box with follower 9249 and bolt parts 377, question with bent bolt is the bolt probably not proper for Gew98, buttstock when origin was sanded and laquered heavily. So its a nice sported piece with family roots, no possible made this a original condition Gew98, You could compare the inspector proofs with various rifles from WW1 period, to find the maker. anyway it should be made sharp usable pictures.

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Thank you 

2 hours ago, AndyBsk said:

As mentioned correctly, there is no maker marking visible,secondly the piece is a missmatch as visible on various serials, receiver 3508? letter. magazine box with follower 9249 and bolt parts 377, question with bent bolt is the bolt probably not proper for Gew98, buttstock when origin was sanded and laquered heavily. So its a nice sported piece with family roots, no possible made this a original condition Gew98, You could compare the inspector proofs with various rifles from WW1 period, to find the maker. anyway it should be made sharp usable pictures.

Thank you

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3 minutes ago, Rangerbob said:

Do you think it’s a standard 7.97 x57?

No way of telling given the number of modifications. IMHO

If it has been rebarrelled who knows.

If you are at all unsure consult with a qualified gunsmith.

Chris

 

FWIW (and that is very little) I would expect it to be in the original calibre if it was a home conversion job as you described.

Edited by 4thGordons
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7 hours ago, Rangerbob said:

I inherited a GEW 98 Mauser that has been frankinsteined by my grandfather.  He was a gunsmith.   I’d like help with indentifying it?  I added a few beauty shots   Could in be an Argentine Mauser?

 

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As such conversions go that is very nicely done, skilled work.

I am fairly certain the donor rifle was a German GEW 98 as you originally indicated given the proof markings etc, All the Argentine Mausers I have handled have had a large crest on the receiver (although often defaced) and have Mauser Modelo Argentina 1909 / and maker's name DWMF on the front of the receiver and the rail.

Chris

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Thanks!

i have a few other rifles of his and most are mismatched barrels and receivers and actions.  My grandfather could barely read and write, but he was a great craftsman.  He hand tooled the stock on this rifle.  

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Looks like a nice older sporter rifle, not done by Bubba! If it was rechambered by a gunsmith, the new caliber should be stamped on the side of the receiver. Most likely it’s stock 7.92x57. Front sight looks to be a Lyman, stock could be from a custom shop like Fajen or Bishop.  
 

While I love original military rifles, well done sporterized ones have a place in my heart as well. 

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Update 

 

I took it to a gunsmith and the barrel, chamber check out safe.  I bought 8 x57 ammo and it wouldn’t load properly into the gun.  So should a try the 7.65 x 57 Argentine round?

Edited by Rangerbob
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The gunsmith should do a chamber cast to determine the correct round. The Argentine round is shorter than 57, more like 53. Experimenting with different rounds is not the safe way to determine the caliber. Once a gunsmith determines the caliber of your gun, then he needs to check the head spacing. 

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The rifle was destined for 7,92mm x 57IS, anyway the magazine could use a shorter case too, when done in USA, it could be 7,62x51 Nato, or something cheap as reworked for shooting, then the barell is complete a replacement, and should be anywhere marked with caliber. The bolt should be too changed as the dimmension of different ammo should have different base of case.

Edited by AndyBsk
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19 hours ago, Hickman said:

The gunsmith should do a chamber cast to determine the correct round. The Argentine round is shorter than 57, more like 53. Experimenting with different rounds is not the safe way to determine the caliber. Once a gunsmith determines the caliber of your gun, then he needs to check the head spacing. 

 

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Great idea.  I had no idea that Was a thing.  I had another Argentine Mauser made by my grandfather that had been rechambered to a 22-250.  It was very clearly marked.  Thank you for the information!

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A pleasing, if rather old-fashioned form of stocking.  The sight looks similar to the Lyman 48, possibly a Pacific one. A Sporting rifle forum would know more. 

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  • 2 weeks later...

So I got a chamber casting and the gun looked at by an excellent gunsmith. The rifle was made by “Flaig”.  Apparently this guy made custom sporterized Mauser rifles in Pennsylvania.  He had a custom operation and you could mix and match whatever you wanted. Mine has a lefthand twist 2x11,24 inch barrel chambered in 30-06 with a pacific peep sight.  

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It was a Faig marked barrel with no markings for the caliber, which is super weird. I had it laser etched with 30-06.  

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Well, no longer of historical interest but as noted an excellent and high quality conversion to a practical and easily obtainable caliber in the US. Such conversions were very common from the 20s to the 70s while donor rifles/actions were cheap.

Glad you got it figured out. A practical rifle in which a 100 year old action serves on and, with care, could probably do so for another century.

Thanks for filling us in on the information.

Chris

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Charley Flaig was THE go to Mauser guy in the US in the ‘50s and ‘60s. He would provide barrels (Flaig “Ace”) or complete rifles, based on 98 actions. One of my local gun shops recently had a K98 with a Flaig barrel, rechambered in 25.06. I hate to think how many Great War Gew 98s were sporterized there!

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