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You can donate books, records to the Internet Archive for scanning.


MaureenE
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Perhaps you would like some of your books or records to be preserved digitally and available to all.

Internet Archive blog

"No Book/Music/Movie (All Media) Donation Too Big or Small: Please Donate"

https://blog.archive.org/2021/01/05/downsizing-in-2021-donate-your-discarded-books-and-media-to-the-internet-archive/

 

You can either mail items, or there are drop off location(s) in England, although I don't know where.

 

The donations are retained by the Internet Archive.

 

Cheers

Maureen

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Hi Maureene- One of a number of changes to Internet Archive that I expect we have both noticed.  I suspect the "donated" items go off to,say,World of Books  and help fund the site.

 

      The major problem with this is copyright.  Most people are going to have modern books that are going to be in copyright-  the recent "Books to Borrow" scheme is a little too clunky for me.   And there must be a limit to the numbers of Readers Digest books that they receive before even they start screaming. (I think 9 is the greatest number of digitisations of the same book I have spotted on the site!!)

 

    

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Unless your books/documents is literal, ones you wrote so copyright is yours??

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From the article linked above "The Internet Archive seeks to preserve and digitize one copy of every book, record, CD, film, and microfilm in support of our mission to provide “Universal Access to All Knowledge.”

 

“We are always looking for items that we don’t have already or ones that are in better shape"

 

"Recent personal donations have included a collection of railroad maps and atlases from the 1800s. Also, a large collection of fragile 78rpm records was donated by a person in Washington, D.C., and 18,000 LP, 45, and 78 records were donated from a home in Arkansas.

 

Coldstreamer, I think  they are looking for copies of ALL books they don't have, even if within copyright. The ones still within copyright in terms of USA legislation,  are  then made available under the Books to Borrow/Lending Library " scheme.

 

        the recent "Books to Borrow" scheme is a little too clunky for me.   

    

For readers, it is true that many of the Book to Borrow can only be read online, not downloaded, but I have been able to read online many books which would not have been available to me unless I managed to locate a copy to buy, and that may have been expensive.

 

I think the Books to Borrow scheme is great, so much better than the alternative of nothing.

 

From the linked article

https://help.archive.org/hc/en-us/articles/360017876312-How-do-I-make-a-physical-donation-to-the-Internet-Archive-

"For materials that do not fit into our collections for any reason, they are often donated to other non-profits or worthy causes, but sometimes thrown away. Rarely are materials sold".

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Thanks Maureene- I find Internet Archive has become a little unmanageable and may have to change its algorithm parameters-Far too many  US patents coming up.

 

As well as this, I think there should be a bit more publicity for all the free modern articles-and some books- available under the different open access schemes. Can't keep abreast of the schemes but  there seems to be some good stuff out there.

 

   It would be nice if Hathi Trust opened up as much-I know we can get extra access with registration but it seems a bit pointless to an old skinflint like me to digitise something and then restrict it-when the marginal cost would be zit.

 

Still prefer the "real stuff" and wonder what Internet Archive will do with significant materials donated to it.  Some of my old customers from my days in Bloomsbury were BL staff who occasionally muttered comments about good books handed in during WW2 paper salvage drives still being in store and unprocessed.  This was at a time when they found 40,000 "forgotten" Canadian books in caissons at Woolwich-they being from the decades of the Nineteenth Century when the British Museum was a copyright deposit library on the Canadian listing

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On 06/01/2021 at 21:53, Maureene said:

I think the Books to Borrow scheme is great, so much better than the alternative of nothing.

 

   Exactly so-  But it does go the problem of why bother soliciting contributions from Joe Public. Would it not be better for Archive to grind its way through some major libraries and digitise the in-copyright stuff-and then put it up under Books to Borrow???

   Soliciting books from Joe Public can be dangerous-  I was asked years ago to act as second sight on a block of books chucked out of the reserve collections of a particular London library-the residue was common books in dreadful condition- which were junked. Then, the liberal lobby emerged and screamed that the stuff could have been given to Lady Ranfurly/Book Aid,etc.  But a chum of mine at Book Aid said it was the worst possible outcome  1) They spent a lot of their time and limited resources  processing and paying to dump lots of useless books they didn't want   2) As he put, a book that is useless in London is also useless in the middle of Africa-that it was patronising to think the Africans could make do with second best- Again, as he put it, if you went down with appendicitis in the middle of Africa would you prefer your surgeon in DRC to be using the standard medical work, say, "Bloggs on Appendectomy"-3rd Edition 1931-given by a liberal do-gooder in England-or the same book in a current edition?

 

By the way Maureene, does FIBIWIS note that with a BL ticket one can remotely access South Asian newspapers from the Gale database system?

 

As a suggestion outside outright donations to the Internet Archive, I do note they solicit "home-grown" digitisation. Would it useful across GWF to think of slowly providing out of copyright "regimentals" etc (or in copyright,with permission)?????   What NLS did with putting on army lists and the Scottish memorial vols was a good thing- but there is a gap for the digitisation of the old regimentals from which everyone could gain. It would certainly save a lot of time across GWF if enquiries could refer to a "look-up" on Internet Archive rather than keep searching round for members with a physical copy of a particular book. Just a thought...

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Thanks  for the comment, but this information had been noted. ( https://wiki.fibis.org/w/Subscription_websites-online_newspapers,_journals_and_directories )

 

Certainly it is possible for anyone to personally scan one of their books and upload the file to the Internet Archive.

You can specifically upload to the Community Texts category.

 

This is not a difficult process.  As part of the process, you need to register (if not already registered), but can use any user name you choose, but you do need to have a “good” internet speed for the upload to take place.  I believe the standard upload is in the form of a pdf.

 

The internet Archive page “Community Texts”  has a section “Click here to contribute your book!”

https://archive.org/details/opensource&tab=about

As part of this process you will need to add, or amend auto fill-in details, such as book title, author, year of publication, language etc. For more details see

https://help.archive.org/hc/en-us/articles/360002360111-Uploading-A-Basic-Guide

 

 

Cheers

Maureen

 

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