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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

identify uniform / regiment


petermiller
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Hi.. I'm new so please accept my appolgies if i'm on the wrong footing. I 'think' this is the Great War, and i'm trying to identify family from this single photo. He's possibly Yorkshire regiment, but it's only an assumption. could anyone advise from the lapel bage? thanks in advance

img20200602_13270691-001-001.jpg

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Welcome to the forum. 11th Prince Alberts Own Hussars. Do you have a name and date/ place of birth? 

 

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I agree with Michelle.  It’s a very distinctive cap badge and the collar badges were simply miniature versions.

 

4D76469D-1B1B-473A-AAFE-78CD921C215C.jpeg

4D46AA13-68F7-4C2E-9A91-27673E4B30FA.jpeg

Edited by FROGSMILE
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3 minutes ago, FROGSMILE said:

I agree with Michelle.  It’s a very distinctive cap badge and the collar badges were simply miniature versions.

 

4D76469D-1B1B-473A-AAFE-78CD921C215C.jpeg

4D46AA13-68F7-4C2E-9A91-27673E4B30FA.jpeg

thank you so much.. i really appreciate this

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1 hour ago, petermiller said:

thank you so much.. i really appreciate this


Glad to help Peter. I omitted to mention that he has two good conduct badges on his left cuff (inverted stripes), which indicates he had between 5 and 6 years of blemish free service as a regular soldier.

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24 minutes ago, jay dubaya said:

Yep... khaki uniform

 

Officially the colour was drab, but from the outset the usage was often khaki. This is a little unfortunate as, historically, khaki was the colour of hot weather clothing, khaki drill.

"Khaki" 1902 service dress, and khaki drill hot weather clothing, are chalk and cheese in colour.

 

However, as I said, the use of "khaki" is very nearly as old as drab. As a pedant, I regret that, but the authorities probably caused the problem by "drab". There is probably a research topic there for some bright young spark.

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thank you all so much.. i;m on my way i'm sure to identifying this gallant chap. I'm not 100% on colour so don't take offence, but i thought you may like my colourised version 

soldier2 copy1.jpg

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17 hours ago, jay dubaya said:

Thanks the clarification Grumpy, am I right in thinking ‘khaki’ was/is a Hindi word meaning dust?


Yes, but originally it was a more blueish grey shade.  Drab was merely a more brown than green shade of serge.  The British Army’s recent adoption of a new service dress (No2) has gone back to a very similar hue when compared with that it replaced.

Edited by FROGSMILE
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On 19/12/2020 at 15:26, petermiller said:

thank you all so much.. i;m on my way i'm sure to identifying this gallant chap. I'm not 100% on colour so don't take offence, but i thought you may like my colourised version 

soldier2 copy1.jpg

Well done so far! I might suggest that you change the bandolier to a more brown leather shade:

 

 

image-63[1].jpeg

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