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Which regiment?


Chriscrosschrissie
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The kilt looks to me like Government tartan.  Hunting Stuart tartan just does not come through looking like this; see 9th RS image below. Further, I have never seen a photo of 9RS soldiers wearing their hose flashes centered on the shin. I have not checked William Duffs as Neill has, but I believe the man is much more likely to be Black Watch, Argyll & Sutherland or 9th Bn HLI all of which fit the characteristics seen in the original posted image.

 

Mike

 

153585238_9RS1902-1906.JPG.35781532853d265fd5c87887183ff0f8.JPG

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4 minutes ago, Chriscrosschrissie said:

Thank you so much.

 

You are welcome.  Just a quick cursory check revealed 9 William Duffs in The Black Watch and 6 in the Argylls.  Won't be easy finding the right Willain Duff.

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Well, it states on the child’s birth certificate that he was a munitions worker so I think he may have been playing dress up in the photo. That was a good idea and has saved me a lot of delving into military records. Thank you so much!

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17 hours ago, Chriscrosschrissie said:

Well, it states on the child’s birth certificate that he was a munitions worker so I think he may have been playing dress up in the photo. That was a good idea and has saved me a lot of delving into military records. Thank you so much!


Playing dress up is extremely unlikely Chris.  It’s more probable that it’s a different man, or that he eventually lost his critical worker status in munitions and was called up subsequently.  This did happen as the need for more men at the front became critical and exclusions and deferrals were reviewed.

Edited by FROGSMILE
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The birth certificate was 1917 and the child in the photo looks about 2 so perhaps photo was taken 1919? There were still 100 men working at that munitions factory - it’s possible he joined up 1914 and was injured so working in munitions in 1917 when the child was born. His wife worked there too. Linlithgow, West Lothian. His brother was in the Seaforths and died in 1918 in Flanders.

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1 hour ago, Chriscrosschrissie said:

The birth certificate was 1917 and the child in the photo looks about 2 so perhaps photo was taken 1919? There were still 100 men working at that munitions factory - it’s possible he joined up 1914 and was injured so working in munitions in 1917 when the child was born. His wife worked there too. Linlithgow, West Lothian. His brother was in the Seaforths and died in 1918 in Flanders.


It’s not impossible that he was wounded and discharged early on, but he should be on the Silver War Badge list if that were the case.

Edited by FROGSMILE
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Thank you for that> I looked and there are quite a few William Duff”s. Any ideas to narrow it down via home town and date of birth perhaps? 

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On 14/11/2020 at 15:26, Chriscrosschrissie said:

Thank you for that> I looked and there are quite a few William Duff”s. Any ideas to narrow it down via home town and date of birth perhaps? 

 

You may be able to narrow it down by regiment first.  As I mentioned earlier, the photo likely shows a soldier from the Black Watch, Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders, or 9th Battalion Highland Light Infantry.  For example, a cursory check showed three Black Watch men on the list with that name.  You could then go back to the Medal Index cards, and, if you are very lucky, there may be a correspondence address for any communications post-War.

Edited by gordon92
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On 14/11/2020 at 15:56, Chriscrosschrissie said:

The birth certificate was 1917 and the child in the photo looks about 2 so perhaps photo was taken 1919? There were still 100 men working at that munitions factory - it’s possible he joined up 1914 and was injured so working in munitions in 1917 when the child was born. His wife worked there too. Linlithgow, West Lothian. His brother was in the Seaforths and died in 1918 in Flanders.

 Am I missing something?

 

He was working in munitions when the child was born in 1917, but is in uniform when the picture is taken with her aged roughly 2 years old? Seems therefore more likely that his service was post birth, not pre-birth.

 

On a different tack - I don't suppose the brothers service record has survived and if so it contains form W.5080. These were sent out usually in 1919 and asked the named next of kin for details of the surviving family. The lay-out of the form follows the standard hierarchy of inheritance at it then applied - wife, children, father, mother, full blood brothers, half blood brothers, full blood sisters, half blood sisters and then anyone else if all of those were blank. If it was filled in before Willam Duff was discharged, then it may either show his unit or if after he left the Army give you a date when he had to have been discharged by .

(From a genealogy perspective they are also be a bit of a gold mine - it asks for ages and addresses, and for the married sisters it gives their surname:)

 

I presume you have also checked out newspaper reports for the brothers death in case they reference William. They may not mention William by name but say something like, he also has a brother serving with the xxx

 

Hope that helps,

Peter

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