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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

Staff officer uniform details


John Petitgirard

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All,

I'm trying to understand the details of staff officer service dress uniforms - I know they wore red gorgets on their jacket lapels, but does anyone know what the color of the soutache (usually also red, but sometimes black?) denoted? Also, the button at the top of the gorget - is their a staff button, or possibly a general-use KC one? (maybe the button from their old regiment??) Also, on a staff officer's visor cap, I've seen the red band, but what cap badge was used? Again, a staff officer specific one, or possibly another?

I realize this is an obscure topic, but any information would be greatly appreciated.

Cheers,

John

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I realize this is an obscure topic, but any information would be greatly appreciated.

Cheers,

John

John, obscure topics are meat and 2 veg to these folk! I can contribute nothing but look forward to the replies. :rolleyes: Phil B

PS Where have you been since Nov 03?

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ah, I've been a lowly private, down in the trenches...

I had to be away from the topic for a while - work, family, the usual stuff - but look forward to becoming far more active. This is truly an excellent website.

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Staff officers in the First world War in the British armies wore a much wider variety of uniform than in the Second. The General Staff officer wore red staff tabs /gorget patches very similar to those worn today. According to rank these would have oak leaves in gold or a piece of red cord ending in a button. They wore the the Staff Lion capbadge now worn by full Colonels and Brigadiers. They had a red band on their caps. Quite lowly rnaked officers could wear these red tabs inlcuding Staff Captains.

I think I have seen evidence officers of specialist staffs wore different colours for example intelligence officers wore green gorget patches and I have heard of examples of blue gorget patches as well although I dont know which staff they belonged to . I am also afraid that I cannot remember if the cap bands were red or followed the colour of gorget patches

Greg

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That's good information - is there any way a picture of the Staff Lion cap badge can be posted here? I have an idea what it looks like, but I'd like to make sure we're both talking about the same cap badge!

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I think I have seen evidence officers of specialist staffs wore different colours for example intelligence officers wore green gorget patches and I have heard of examples of blue gorget patches as well although I dont know which staff they belonged to . I am also afraid that I cannot remember if the cap bands were red or followed the colour of gorget patches

Greg

Green cap band - Intelligence staff (with green gorget)

Burgundy cap band - Medical staff Officer (black gorget with burgundy cord)

Dark blue cap band - Admin. Staff Officer (D.Blue gorget with red cord)

RFC Staff officers had the standard red cap band but had pale blue gorgets with red cord.

Dave.

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I have a pic of what I think the cap badge is

John

That picture is of a General Service Corps other-rank's badge. The Staff badge is like an enlargened version of the crown and lion bit of it. Generals had their own "rank" cap badges in Gold bullion.

Dave

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This is excellent info - thanks to all. Here's another example of a staff cap badge - hopefully this is what a Major or LtCol would wear (I think the cap itself is for a higher ranking officer).

post-23-1109103912.jpg

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This is Major C.F.Cahusac DSO, who was 36th Jacobs Horse att. Staff. He had the 1914 Star as well (not being worn here), and the other medal shown is the Order of The White Eagle 5th Class with Swords.

post-23-1109104927.jpg

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That's an interesting picture of the Major's collar tabs - I've never seen them sewn onto the bottom half of the lapel notch. Is that a normal placement??

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Below, second from the right, Lt Gwilym Lloyd George, Prime Minister LG's youngest son wearing gorget tabs ect as ADC to Major General Sir Ivor Phillips GOC 38 (Welsh) Division (second from left).

post-23-1109106122.jpg

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Below, second from the right, Lt Gwilym Lloyd George, Prime Minister LG's youngest son wearing gorget tabs ect as ADC to Major General Sir Ivor Phillips GOC 38 (Welsh) Division (second from left).

Cushy billet for him then.

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That's an interesting picture of the Major's collar tabs - I've never seen them sewn onto the bottom half of the lapel notch. Is that a normal placement??

Neither have I. I would have thought they were sewn on incorrectly, but I suspect someone will come up with an explanation! :( Phil B

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Paul

This is Major C.F.Cahusac DSO

. . . . with 3 pips?

Likewise, never seen the gorget patches worn this way. If all else fails, it must have been regimental tradition, or he was a doctor or padre. Whoops.

Chris

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Perhaps he was an Acting Major, substantive Captain: I have no idea when this photo was taken - it was taken in India - and why he doesn't wear his 1914 star, but it is him, as he has signed it on the back. And I have checked out his MIC etc which shows the rank of Major having been engraved on the medals.

He wasn't a chaplain or RAMC; he was an Indian Army oficer - 36th Jacobs Horse, as stated in the original post.

Considering he was IA, maybe this was their method of wearing the tabs?

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Likewise, never seen the gorget patches worn this way. If all else fails, it must have been regimental tradition,

Chris

But being staff, he was extra-regimental! So regimental tradition wouldn`t apply?

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