Jump to content
Great War Forum

Remembered Today:

Recommended Posts

I have been asked to comment on the following on a genealogy forum a question to which, frankly, I am not sure of the answer.

 

"Would it be possible  /probable for a fitter (apparently an RGA member) to be given an inscribed sterling silver cigarette case for

 

services between 1914-1918." 

 

Hoping someone may have the answer.

 

   

Link to post
Share on other sites
squirrel

Not unusual for members of the forces to be presented with a gift from their local community in recognition of their service during the Great war. I have one such gift given to the those returning from the War and inscribed "from the inhabitants of........to.......in recognition of his service during the Great war 1914-1919.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Dai Bach y Sowldiwr
38 minutes ago, David B said:

"Would it be possible...?

Anything is possible.

Ask them to be more specific, post an image of the case, the inscription, and a more specific answer might (possibly) ensue.

Link to post
Share on other sites
HERITAGE PLUS

Some places even produced medals/medallions to honour their local men, of all ranks.

 

https://www.greatwarforum.org/topic/26341-village-war-medal/?tab=comments#comment-207300

 

Dave

Link to post
Share on other sites

I've got this vague recollection of the following which I can't remember the source. It went something like this...

 

Following Peace Day celebrations in Winchester 19 July 1919, veterans were invited to dine at the Corn Exchange and were presented with a gift by the City.

These gifts were, more often than not, tobacco related.

 

This probably happened all over the country and could be how the gift in the Original Post came about.

 

Local newspapers may have the answer...

 

Alan.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks to those who answered my query. I have passed on the gist of the replies to the original seeker and she is quite satisfied with the answers.

 

David

Link to post
Share on other sites
TullochArd

As Squirrel says there are many such examples. 

 

Local to me, 204701 Cpl John William Barnes MM received a "beautiful gold watch" engraved "To Corporal J.W. Barnes M.M. by his employers Sir H.W, Trickett's Ltd. Oct 19th 1918 for brave deeds done" ...... at the same presentation he also received a wallet from the congregation of Bethlehem Unitarian Church, Newchurch, Rawtenstall, containing an "undisclosed" sum of "Treasury notes" ......  local lore suggests £50 which in 1918 was a truly colossal sum.

 

I would offer the obvious that the type of gift and frequency largely driven by the community the recipient came from. In this case there is also the possibility, it may also be similar to many examples from India and the Far East gifted by military comrades.  Any hallmarks?  Did the Fitter and RGA possibilities lead to a possible name? The actual inscription would certainly be of use.

 

Edited by TullochArd
Link to post
Share on other sites
29 minutes ago, TullochArd said:

containing an "undisclosed" sum of "Treasury notes" ......  

 

"Treasury Notes" in £1 and 10/- denominations being issued by HM Treasury from 1914 to 1928, replacing the gold sovereigns and half sovereigns - fear being that gold would be hoarded by the public during the war.  .

The Bank of England only taking over the issue of £1 and 10/- "Bank Notes" from 1928 to 1988 and 1970 respectively. 

 

36 minutes ago, TullochArd said:

local lore suggests £50 which in 1918 was a truly colossal sum.

 

That would be a fair size wedge to fit in a wallet...couldn't be less that 50 Treasury Notes.

 

White Fivers were issued by the Bank of England throughout the period 1694 to 1956. 

 

Alan.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, TullochArd said:

£50 which in 1918 was a truly colossal sum.

 

Apparently equivalent to £1986.43 today. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
TullochArd
38 minutes ago, Alan24 said:

 

Apparently equivalent to £1986.43 today. 

 

:thumbsup:

Link to post
Share on other sites
BullerTurner

A friend has the gold watch presented to his grandfather and every other returning serviceman from their Monmouthshire village.  The name of the village escapes me but he was a private in the 1/2nd Monmouthshire Regiment, IIRC?

Edited by BullerTurner
Generation mistake! Grand not father!
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...